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#5041 Wilfrid

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Posted 19 September 2017 - 06:28 PM

I could never get on with Vollman, much though I liked the idea of him.


Stirrings Still at the Pig: Boston and Made Nice

At the Sign of the Pink Pig


#5042 AaronS

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Posted 19 September 2017 - 09:24 PM

this one (the butterfly stories, a novel) is enjoyable.

#5043 mongo_jones

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Posted 20 September 2017 - 12:04 AM

exit west, mohsin hamid. very good.

 

home fire, kamila shamsie. quite good; falters a bit in the middle before picking up steam again at the end.


my annoying opinions: whisky, food and occasional cultural commentary

 

current restaurant review: piccolo (minneapolis)

 

current whisky review: rampur select casks (indian single malt whisky)

 

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facts are meaningless. you could use facts to prove anything that's even remotely true!
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#5044 Wilfrid

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Posted 20 September 2017 - 02:14 PM

this one (the butterfly stories, a novel) is enjoyable.

 

Yes, I did read that one.  And Whores for Gloria, I think.


Stirrings Still at the Pig: Boston and Made Nice

At the Sign of the Pink Pig


#5045 AaronS

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Posted 20 September 2017 - 03:49 PM

I didn't like whores for gloria.

#5046 Daniel

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Posted 21 September 2017 - 04:22 PM

I read the vegetarian by han kang, which was a completely strange book.. Apparently, it was artsy and whatever and won a Booker Man Prize  and has been praised all over the world..  I don't know, perhaps I didn't get it, or care, or more so didn't really care about the characters.. It was ok, I just didn't connect.. I appreciated some of it but, really not.. 

 

What can I say, this was the first Booker Man Prize recipient, I didn't connect with.. I am sure there are many more.   

 

Pre-ordered a few copies of the New Gillian Flynn book for a couple of people who I shared her first book with.. Apparently, it comes out October 3rd. 


Ason, I keep planets in orbit.

#5047 taion

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 02:15 AM

Possibly not the right thread, but this vintage series of undercover pieces from the Chicago Sun-Times is fantastic: http://sites.dlib.ny...icago-sun-times

 

The reporters ran a bar undercover for months to collect information on various forms of corruption in Chicago.

 

Found it through a pretty good oral history of the thing on Topichttps://www.topic.co...at-bought-a-bar


I didn't tip at Per Se either.

#5048 Daniel

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 01:37 PM

I buy books online and have them shipped to my house.. I get rid of the old ones by leaving them on my stoop or giving to friends.. My floor started to buckle and I now have the books I cant part with stacked in various corners.. Outside of the ones that fit on the shelves in Miss K' room, Jax's Room and my bedroom.  It looks decorative.. Not too bad.. 

 

I grabbed a few books on the way out the door on a recent trip.. I had no idea how I got this book but, it was my last book and I read it.. The name of the book is In A Dark Dark Wood.. Anyway, it was a quick read and supposedly scary and lots of famous people gave it a thumbs up and it was a NY Times Best Seller.. Reese Witherspoon is quoted on the cover saying, it's the scariest thing in the world.. 

 

It was not scary, it was slightly entertaining, it's only merit was, that it kept a nice pace and it helped me two nights where I had trouble sleeping.. 

 

But, the reason I am writing this is, it's supposed to be a movie and surprise, Reese Witherspoon is producing it.   Has anyone read it or, heard that it is coming out? I could see one instance where a movie is better than the book. 


Ason, I keep planets in orbit.

#5049 Suzanne F

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 01:46 PM

A Square Meal: A Culinary History of the Great Depression, by Jane Ziegelman and Andrew Coe. What a sad book (so far; I'm only up to about 1932). I had no idea what to expect it would say, but apparently the situation was worse for more people than I ever could have imagined.


Butter is a little like money and alcohol. It doesn't solve any problems but may help smooth over a few. -- voyager, 13 October 2017 - 9:49 AM

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#5050 voyager

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 02:50 PM

A Square Meal: A Culinary History of the Great Depression, by Jane Ziegelman and Andrew Coe. What a sad book (so far; I'm only up to about 1932). I had no idea what to expect it would say, but apparently the situation was worse for more people than I ever could have imagined.

My parents had a farm during the depression.   With a huge household garden, chickens and a cow.   My father worked in town.    I was told that the rule was that if my older brothers brought anyone home with them, they were to be invited for meals since chances were they were hungry.   

 

Fast forward, when our son taught in SF high schools, he kept a refrigerator in his room stocked with milk and sandwich makings, reporting that he never knew when some of his students hadn't eaten that day, or even slept in a bed.

 

We've come a long way?     Well, some people have.


"A meal without wine is called breakfast."   Camille Fourmont