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#5356 Wilfrid

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 02:19 AM

Oh wow Koeppen. Anyone? I have to read everything else by him now.

#5357 Wilfrid

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 02:21 AM

Also the Sondheim. His two volumes have been on my “to own” list for a while, and I picked up the second at a Chelsea street market today for $4, as new. I then carried it around for the rest of the day and it’s heavier than a laptop.

Started reading, and he comes with no false humility. 😆

#5358 Chambolle

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 11:57 PM

If you are interested in the Boeing 737 Max situation, this is THE definitive article to read
 
https://www.nytimes....pgtype=Homepage
 
My college fraternity brother friend Cork graduated and, quite unusually, made no use of his studies and opted to pursue something he loved to do and became a commercial pilot. That has been and still is his career … a captain for American Airlines (flying Airbus craft) and now also heavily involved in making sure the AA pilot fleet is properly trained and up to snuff
 
He said the following re the above article
 

This is by far the best article on this I have seen.
The author’s father literally wrote the book on basic airmanship that was read by generations like me (and my father) when we were learning to fly !

 
 
Another friend, one of my best friends in life, has been a pilot for decades, owns aircraft and I’ve flown with him, he as pilot, many, many times. Further he is a CEO-type and one of the world’s leading authorities on avionics and is very well known in the industry and has been so for quite a while
 
Hence, just providing some context that these guys know WTF they're talking about
 
When the first jet crashed and there were the immediate analyses to follow, it sounded to me like pilot error. I asked the Avionics Wiz by forwarding him an appropriately relevant article and asked for his opinion. He tersely replied “Pilot error”
 
Then there was the 2nd crash and this article ...
 
https://www.wsj.com/...ax-11565966629?
 
I forwarded the article to him, with the subject line "Are you still thinking ...", and the body saying  "or stuck on ... Pilot Error ? #boeingapologist  "
 
Radio silence from the Wiz ... but he's a busy guy and I wasn't looking for a response ... just making sure that an excellent article didn't slip past him
 
From this article, it seemed pretty clear to me that there was a catastrophic American regulatory failure caused by the regulatory agency not doing their job AND a powerful, politically connected corporation that decided way in advance, for competitive reasons, that hell or high water, this plane was going to be approved with the pilot training that they deemed appropriate (ie inappropriate) and that they would do whatever the hell they wanted to and it was a shocking level of arrogance from an engineering culture that thinks we are smarter than everyone and we know what's best and pilots don't need to know stuff that we don't think they need know.
 
I read that article and said to myself ... Boy did Boeing f%ck up ! and they are so tone deaf it's scary (but of course they are just trying to avoid as much liability as possible aka CYA when it is major big time exposed)
 
When I received Cork’s quoted words above, I forwarded them along with the article to the Avionics Wiz and he responded as follows … (I'll note that the Wiz is a fellow frat bro too and knows Cork well)
 

This article is spectacular

As Cork mentioned, the author’s father wrote and published a book in 1944 called “Stick and Rudder”. It is still in print and is absolutely the authoritative text on the basics of flying an airplane. One of my prized possessions is an old copy that I purchased at a used bookstore that I keep in my office

https://en.wikipedia...am_Langewiesche
https://en.wikipedia...ng_Langewiesche
https://en.wikipedia...tick_and_Rudder

Check out these Amazon reviews written in the 2010s about a book written in 1944 https://smile.amazon...customerReviews

Have fun in Japan and avoid those 3rd world airlines!!!



#5359 StephanieL

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Posted 26 September 2019 - 11:40 PM

We saw George Takei at the Commonwealth Club on Tuesday, and with admission we got a copy of his new graphic memoir, "They Called Us Enemy".  Drawn in a manga style, it tells about his and his family's internment during World War II.  It's a very good read and a great way to present the story.


"Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires." --John Steinbeck

 

"Insanity runs in my family.  It practically gallops."--Arsenic and Old Lace

 


#5360 Wilfrid

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Posted 17 October 2019 - 03:57 AM

Outside Argosy Books, on the cheapo stand, I found Czeslaw Milosz’s Land of Ulro, an absorbing combination of memoir and commentary on William Blake (and Polish writers).

References finally propelled me to read Gershom Scholem on the Kabbalah, which has been vaguely on my list for 20 or 30 years. Don’t put it off. Even if the topic is of minor interest, this is comprehensive primary source scholarship focused into manageable scope, and beautifully written.

#5361 Sneakeater

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Posted 17 October 2019 - 04:52 AM

Scholem:  Best footnotes of anyone.  (Even better than Toynbee's.)


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#5362 Wilfrid

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Posted 17 October 2019 - 02:15 PM

That is so true.
 
Now wondering if I should read Meyrink's The Golem.  Seen the movie, of course.
 

dg31.jpg



#5363 Wilfrid

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Posted 05 November 2019 - 11:47 PM

Robert Graves, Goodbye to All That. Not bad.

Gregor von Rezzori, Abel and Cain, another great reprint from NYRB. This is terrific. Essentially a 900 page monologue. But it’s often very funny, it’s steeped in European history, it doesn’t like Nazis, and it’s highly readable.

Then again, I think Musil is funny and readable.

I have 100 pages left when I get back from my current trip. It was too heavy to carry for the last 100 pages. Graves was understudy.

#5364 AaronS

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Posted 06 November 2019 - 05:09 AM

I just read musil’s first book (as prep for reading the big one) and I’m sad I didn’t read it in undergrad. still enjoyable, of course, but I can’t believe I didn’t get to it earlier. there are new translations of two of his shorter books if that escaped anyone’s notice.

#5365 Sneakeater

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Posted 06 November 2019 - 05:29 AM

This is sort of an instance of the Stockholm Syndrome, but I was actually grateful for Memoirs of an Anti-Semite.
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#5366 Wilfrid

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Posted 06 November 2019 - 11:44 PM

Right, memoirs is now on my list.

@Aaron, Torless is astonishing, very different from MWQ. Like, not at all funny. Which is the other short book, Tonka? I guess I can ask Google.

#5367 AaronS

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Posted 06 November 2019 - 11:50 PM

https://archipelagob...r/musil-robert/

#5368 Wilfrid

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Posted 06 November 2019 - 11:50 PM

I see NYRB gives us Agathe which seems mainly extracted from MWQ. I see claims that it contains previously unpublished material, which surprises me as I thought Burton Pike had included all the unfinished fragments in the second volume of his MWQ. I must investigate.

This is not a book Musil planned to publish.

#5369 Wilfrid

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Posted 06 November 2019 - 11:52 PM

Thanks Aaron. Intimate Ties is a new version of Unions, which contains some of his most surprising and difficult writing.

Good to see a Musil industry underway.

#5370 voyager

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Posted 08 November 2019 - 02:39 AM

49031809072_0e85e82333_c.jpg


It's not my circus,

not my monkeys.