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#16 John Whiting

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Posted 21 May 2006 - 04:46 PM

Been there, ate that...
John Whiting, London
Paris Bistros

#17 Andy Lynes

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Posted 22 May 2006 - 09:30 AM

Matt, you are the best 1 man PR machine I've ever come across. You've eclipsed Andy Poole-Lynes by miles. :lol: :lol:


I do hope you've seen the latest edition of olive magazine.

#18 SamanthaF

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Posted 22 May 2006 - 10:03 AM

I do hope you've seen the latest edition of olive magazine.


Don't read it I'm afraid.

It's a bit of a poor mans Food & Drink
Okay, they can tell me "miso butterscotch" until the cows come home, but I say it's toffee and I say the hell with it. This is the goo an eight year-old wants to find in the middle of a candy bar. No adult in their senses wants it creeping up on their pig parts.
Wilfrid at The Pink Pig.

"I'm lost. You shat on the cum-carpet, or you came on the shit-carpet?" - The Wonderful LML 5th Feb, 2008.

"God bless those fucking guidelines. Where would we be without them?" - Stone March 2008

#19 Andy Lynes

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Posted 22 May 2006 - 12:34 PM

Do you mean Good Food? There are some superficial similarlities I suppose but more on the recipe side of things. I must admit I haven't picked up a Good Food in a while but I don't think it has the restaurant, bar and travel coverage that olive does which is very good in my opinion - but then I would say that. Overall, I'd say it was more like the old Gourmet Good Food if you remember that. Its probably not quite up mouthfuls/OA/eGullet members street but you might be pleasantly surprised.

#20 Wilfrid1

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Posted 22 May 2006 - 02:15 PM

The estimable Mr Whiting makes some very penetrating comments about sous vide cooking in that piece.
Elect-a-lujah

***Every Monday***At the Sign of the Pink Pig.

If the author could go around the place hitting random readers with a rubber hammer, the Pink Pig would still be worth a visit.

#21 Andy Lynes

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Posted 22 May 2006 - 02:26 PM

He's wrong about pork belly however. I had some that had been cooked for days at an extremely low temperature at the Riverside Brasserie when Heston still owned it and it was the best I've ever had.

#22 Wilfrid1

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Posted 22 May 2006 - 02:52 PM

I had a duck dish last week, which I would have sworn had been cooked sous vide, were it not for the current banning of the method in New York. If I said where, someone would chop my feet off - but it was a rare run in with duck breast with completely non-caramelised skin and unrendered fat. :lol:
Elect-a-lujah

***Every Monday***At the Sign of the Pink Pig.

If the author could go around the place hitting random readers with a rubber hammer, the Pink Pig would still be worth a visit.

#23 Rian

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Posted 22 May 2006 - 03:03 PM

I didn't realise that the method was currently banned in NY - I was under the impression that safety concerns surrounding it had faded in the face of more precise temperature controls. How long is the ban expected to last?

#24 Wilfrid1

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Posted 22 May 2006 - 03:15 PM

As I understand it, and there are some links here somewhere, the concern is less about dishes being freshly prepared sous vide, then served, but that some restaurants have started to use the technique to cook dishes in advance and then store them. The authorities have banned its use while they think about it - who knows how long it will take?

Okay, here's the thread.
Elect-a-lujah

***Every Monday***At the Sign of the Pink Pig.

If the author could go around the place hitting random readers with a rubber hammer, the Pink Pig would still be worth a visit.

#25 Rian

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Posted 22 May 2006 - 03:27 PM

Thanks Wilfrid, some interesting links in there. Has it profoundly altered the experience of eating in any restaurant (s) in particular?

#26 Wilfrid1

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Posted 22 May 2006 - 03:40 PM

Some restaurants, such as Blue Hill, were particularly known for using the technique, and I imagine it must have changed their menus a fair bit. From memory, the new restaurant Gilt served me at least two sous vide dishes on my last visit.
Elect-a-lujah

***Every Monday***At the Sign of the Pink Pig.

If the author could go around the place hitting random readers with a rubber hammer, the Pink Pig would still be worth a visit.

#27 John Whiting

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Posted 23 May 2006 - 05:25 AM

He's wrong about pork belly however. I had some that had been cooked for days at an extremely low temperature at the Riverside Brasserie when Heston still owned it and it was the best I've ever had.

A rising restaurant reviewer who disliked sous-vide would be as much in demand as an ambitious young music critic who hated rock. :lol:
John Whiting, London
Paris Bistros

#28 degusto

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Posted 23 May 2006 - 07:41 AM

What would be in more demand would be food writers that actually understand the sous vide cooking process and who realizes that it is just one of the techniques at the chefs’ disposal. It really is laughable when phrases such as “it brings out the best of the produce” are being used. Those people have completely misunderstood everything. It is like the music critic who hates rock music yet doesn't know what it is.

During a very recent (blah) meal at Aikens the table next to me was served something that may become the next absurd trend in fine dining trend, namely sous vide cooked food served table side. Yes you read it right, the waiter brought the plates with garnish and the ordered turbot came in a plastic bag together with some spinach. The waiter showed the guests the plastic bags, which obviously did not look particularly appetising, and lectured on how it had been cooked. Not without some difficulty the bag was cut open with scissors and, again not without some difficulty, the fish and the spinach were squeezed out on to the plate and the plate was served the guest. :lol: :lol:

#29 Andy Lynes

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Posted 23 May 2006 - 07:41 AM

I'm neither for nor against sous-vide, I just take it on a case by case basis!

#30 degusto

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Posted 23 May 2006 - 07:54 AM

I'm neither for nor against sous-vide, I just take it on a case by case basis!


I am sorry but I don't really follow. What is it you take on a case by case basis? That it as a technique is superior or that it worked in the hands of the chef for that specific case?