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#31 joiei

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Posted 11 April 2007 - 06:37 PM

I have enjoyed learning with my new Leica, the one that Pim talked about. Very happy so far with what I am getting.
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#32 Orik

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Posted 11 April 2007 - 07:49 PM

Orik, have you looked at dPreview? In addition to extensive, detailed rev iews, there are forums for various cameras that discuss the pros and cons, with images.


I did, Lippy. It's not as useful as it once was, both because it just makes me want to go out and buy a DSLR (which really isn't what I'm looking for, unless they find a magical way to shrink them) and because there are many cameras that get scores like "Highly Recommended (just)" and "Recommended (plus)" and so on.
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#33 Melonious Thunk

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Posted 11 April 2007 - 08:46 PM

Be sure to let us know your decision!


It will be a Nikon D80 with a 24-120 f/3 5-5.6 G AF-S VR IF-ED Nikorr auto focus lens

and

Nikon 80-400mm f/4 5-5.6D ED Vibration Reduction Autofocus lens.

Took me 9 months to make a decision.

I backed off the D200 as it was heavier and more detailed and more $$ than I need for my putzing around.
"Pippa, I'm going to tell you something and it's important. Sometimes you have to go to work."__Hannah Marie Konstadt, Two years, nine months.

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#34 tanabutler

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Posted 12 April 2007 - 12:02 AM


Be sure to let us know your decision!


It will be a Nikon D80 with a 24-120 f/3 5-5.6 G AF-S VR IF-ED Nikorr auto focus lens

and

Nikon 80-400mm f/4 5-5.6D ED Vibration Reduction Autofocus lens.

Took me 9 months to make a decision.

I backed off the D200 as it was heavier and more detailed and more $$ than I need for my putzing around.

Well, I am jealous as hell, at leat about your lenses.

The lens I want is the Nikon 18-200mm/3.5-5.6G ED-IF VR, but it's rarely in stock when I have that kind of money.

#35 Orik

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Posted 12 April 2007 - 12:33 AM

having read reviews on various sites I'm more undecided than before.
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#36 kuan

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Posted 12 April 2007 - 11:13 AM

For me, digital cameras aren't out of the point and shoot stage yet. They have yet to achieve 35mm resolution. For the price of a D100 or a 50D or whatever, you can get a nice used medium format camera with all the good stuff.
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#37 porkwah

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Posted 12 April 2007 - 11:52 AM

So what do I buy for a small (but good) cam for travel with a delay that won't annoy me too much? Leica?



In general delay is much, much less than it was a couple years ago.
I have a canon powershot g7 and a canon powershot sd40; both are good cameras for their league.

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#38 Rail Paul

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Posted 09 May 2007 - 12:57 PM

Walt Mossberg's column in the WSJ looks at digital cameras today. Reporter Kathleen Boehlert even finds a camera that "slims down" the subject.

Point and Shoot, or Flaunt and Pocket

As you begin looking for a camera, selecting a preferred size and shape will help narrow your choices. Like iPods and cellphones, stylish pocket cameras are fashionable accessories; some come in shades like Precious Rose or Noble Blue. These pocket models, designed with emphasis on small size, are as easy to carry as they are to use for taking good photos: most offer seven or eight megapixels each, a 3x or better optical zoom lens and a stunning viewing screen. Good examples include Sony Corp.'s $400 Cyber-shot DSC-T100 or Nikon Inc.'s $300 Coolpix S50.

If you don't mind sacrificing style for a camera that's sturdier in your hand but bulkier in your purse, point-and-shoot models will be more your speed. On average, these cost less than their showy cousins. They're more likely to have protruding zoom lenses that don't collapse entirely into the camera body and often feature larger buttons. More point-and-shoots offer optical viewfinders, which have become practically extinct on pocket digicams where real estate is scarce. Examples of point-and-shoots with optical viewfinders include Eastman Kodak Co.'s EasyShare C653 and Canon Inc.'s PowerShot A460 -- both cost $130.

A third category of digital cameras, the single-lens reflex or SLR, continues to be marketed to regular consumers rather than to the photography enthusiasts for whom they were originally intended. SLR prices have dropped a couple of hundred dollars in the past year, but many models still start around $800 and come with detachable lenses and flashes. Average users can steer clear of SLR cameras.




WSJ


Megapixels ----Smart R967 with 10 megapixels----- such intense resolution is really only necessary if you plan to heavily edit or blow up your photographs for jumbo prints, which most people won't be doing.

Zoom Confusion ----This year, companies also created a new category for cameras with 10x or 12x optical-zoom lenses -- these are often referred to as high zoom digital cameras. In reality, a camera with about a 4x optical zoom is sufficient for most people.

Facial Recognition----This category is likely to become more popular. Facial recognition makes the camera smart enough to recognize that the subject contains a face and must be captured with the correct balance of color and lighting.

Image stabilization ----- there are three kinds of IS: optical and mechanical image stabilization, which physically steady a camera even when your hand is shaking, or digital image stabilization, which can improve a shot when the photographed subject is moving.

Some cameras, like the $250 Olympus Stylus 760, offer dual IS. This means the camera is equipped with both digital and mechanical or optical image stabilization, the best of both worlds. If you'll be using a camera specifically for shots of moving objects, digital IS will work.

Storage -- on Your Camera or on a Web Site -----The cost of memory cards has dropped by half compared with last year: one-gigabyte memory cards now only cost about $30, and $50 two-gigabyte cards are even more popular thanks to people who want to record videos for uploading and sharing on Web sites. Data can be transferred from these cards by plugging them into a computer using an adapter or a card slot, or cameras can be connected to PCs with USB cords.

Now, Kodak, Nikon and Sony offer cameras with wireless Internet connection capabilities, or Wi-Fi. This allows you to take pictures and, when connected to a Wi-Fi hotspot, upload them directly to a Web site for sharing or storing, saving you the step of transferring the images to a computer first. These cameras are the $200 EasyShare One from Kodak, Nikon's $350 Coolpix S50c and Sony's $600 Cyber-shot DSC-G1.

Although using Wi-Fi in a digital camera is a smart idea, it could be a real drain on your camera's battery. Wi-Fi is by no means a necessary feature, but some people will find it a useful add-on.

Battery Tips ---Camera battery life can be affected by new features like extra-large screens -- especially those that can play slideshows of your photographs -- built-in Wi-Fi and even in-camera editing, which requires your camera and LCD screen to be on for longer periods.

In-Camera Editing --- Cameras from all of the major manufacturers now enable red-eye fixes either as the photo is captured or after the fact. Companies such as Kodak offer zooming, cropping and panoramic shot stitching, while H-P cameras offer touch-ups like blemish-removing and ways to make a subject look slimmer.
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#39 Melonious Thunk

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Posted 09 May 2007 - 04:02 PM



Be sure to let us know your decision!


It will be a Nikon D80 with a 24-120 f/3 5-5.6 G AF-S VR IF-ED Nikorr auto focus lens

and

Nikon 80-400mm f/4 5-5.6D ED Vibration Reduction Autofocus lens.

Took me 9 months to make a decision.

I backed off the D200 as it was heavier and more detailed and more $$ than I need for my putzing around.

Well, I am jealous as hell, at leat about your lenses.

The lens I want is the Nikon 18-200mm/3.5-5.6G ED-IF VR, but it's rarely in stock when I have that kind of money.


I bought the D80 kit with an 18-135 AF ED lens. I'll wait to get the feel of the camera before buying aditional lenses. The 18-200 VR lens is scare like hens teeth. B&H sold 300 in one day when a shipment came in.
"Pippa, I'm going to tell you something and it's important. Sometimes you have to go to work."__Hannah Marie Konstadt, Two years, nine months.

'How high can you stoop?"__Oscar Levant.

#40 Evelyn

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Posted 10 May 2007 - 02:46 AM




Be sure to let us know your decision!


It will be a Nikon D80 with a 24-120 f/3 5-5.6 G AF-S VR IF-ED Nikorr auto focus lens

and

Nikon 80-400mm f/4 5-5.6D ED Vibration Reduction Autofocus lens.

Took me 9 months to make a decision.

I backed off the D200 as it was heavier and more detailed and more $$ than I need for my putzing around.

Well, I am jealous as hell, at leat about your lenses.

The lens I want is the Nikon 18-200mm/3.5-5.6G ED-IF VR, but it's rarely in stock when I have that kind of money.


I bought the D80 kit with an 18-135 AF ED lens. I'll wait to get the feel of the camera before buying aditional lenses. The 18-200 VR lens is scare like hens teeth. B&H sold 300 in one day when a shipment came in.


That's the camera two friends who are professionals (one works for the Baltimore Sun, the other Sports Illustrated) recommended for something worthy and not costing thousands of dollars.

#41 bushey

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Posted 10 May 2007 - 02:04 PM

I would love to get a digital SLR, to upgrade from my Nikon Coolpix 5400. At the moment, though, I'm looking for a pocket-size digital camera with decent features and a really low price tag -- say around $100 tops, to take on vacation. I need something to slip into a small purse and that I don't really care abou losing or having ripped off. We're headed to Barcelona and I've heard/read enough horror stories about petty crime and pickpocketing to make me concerned. Also, a few other people in our party will have SLRs and love to share their photos.

#42 Evelyn

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Posted 14 May 2007 - 03:27 PM

Orik, have you looked at dPreview? In addition to extensive, detailed rev iews, there are forums for various cameras that discuss the pros and cons, with images.




Interesting, I went to look up reviews on on dpreview and it seems Amazon.com has acquired the site.

#43 Peter Creasey

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Posted 14 May 2007 - 06:46 PM

Here's an announcement about the release of the Canon s5is .

This camera seems to be generating quite a bit of interest.
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#44 rancho_gordo

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Posted 26 February 2008 - 09:51 PM

I'm so confused where I should put this.
I would like a very good camera.
Macros and shooting in bad light are more important than pixels or landscapes or zoom.

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#45 Eddie L

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Posted 26 February 2008 - 11:45 PM

QUOTE(rancho_gordo @ Feb 26 2008, 04:51 PM) View Post
Macros and shooting in bad light are more important than pixels or landscapes or zoom.

The mid-range DSLR cameras mentioned in this thread are certainly candidates. If you get one that takes interchangeable lenses you can get a dedicated macro lens (if that's important to you).

Some sort of anti-shake technology can be helpful if you want to do hand-held photos in poor light. Some of the camera bodies have it built-in, while others require special lenses with anti-shake.

I wouldn't rule out some of the more advanced cameras with integrated lenses, though. Follow Melissa's Flickr links in her post on the point-n-shoot thread. The macro results she's getting with the Canon G9 are pretty impressive.


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