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Sneakeater

Member Since 24 May 2007
Offline Last Active Today, 12:02 AM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Frenchette

Yesterday, 05:03 PM

I mean, we're not talking about Vongerichten restaurants in the heyday of that chain, when they would simply not make reservations generally available from 8 to 10 before "day of" -- and then you would go and the place would be empty except for you and a few models.


In Topic: Frenchette

Yesterday, 04:57 PM

I mean, when Al Di La opened in Park Slope, they didn't take reservations.  And there was always a long long line to get in, from opening to closing.  But my wife and I went pretty much every week.  So pretty soon, whenever they saw us, they waved us to the front of the line.  Was that exclusionary?  It's just the right way to run a restaurant.  (But because that was just a restaurant in Park Slope, it would never have become a big social issue.)


In Topic: Frenchette

Yesterday, 04:53 PM

I mean look. I don't want to make this into something it's not. I'm completely unbothered at not being able to get in. But come on. You cant argue keeping all prime time reservations to be doled out to people known to the house isn't exclusionary.

 

My point is, I don't think they do that.  Is anybody checking at 12:01 AM exactly 30 days out (or however their reservation system works)?  Do we know that prime-time reservations are never generally available (as opposed to only available for a few minutes, owing to extreme demand)?

 

If you saw how many unknown walk-ins they accommodate every night (and how hard they work to do so), you'd think the same way I do.


In Topic: Frenchette

Yesterday, 04:50 PM

To be clear, it does bother me that the New York dining scene has become so overheated that hot openings are impossible to get into.  (I acknowledge that I needed a connection -- although, as I said, it was an "innocent" one -- to get into Frenchette the first time.)  And even worse, nine times out of ten, by the time you can get into them, the proprietors have lost interest and the place no longer features whatever it was that made it hot in the first place.

 

I just don't see this, as a general matter, as evidence of exclusionary intent on the part of the restaurant.  It's just the result of an overheated market.


In Topic: Frenchette

Yesterday, 04:45 PM

Right.  It's standard operating procedure in the industry.  It's just that when this happens at some restaurant near one of our apartments in Brooklyn, nobody thinks anything of it:  it's just the ways things do and should work.  (And remember that popular neighborhood restaurants can be just as hard to get into as Frenchette:  it's just that there the demand is more localized.)  But since this is a Big-Deal Uber-Hot Downtown Manhattan Opening, it somehow is perceived as being evidence of exclusionary conduct when they do it.