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Bangkok recommendations


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#1 balex

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Posted 11 September 2006 - 03:43 PM

I have a couple of days in Bangkok ; I am staying with someone who knows the ropes fairly well but does anyone have any particularly good places they feel like sharing. I don't want high-end hotel food that is disastrously westernised, but some good 'palace/royal' cooking would be good to know about plus any interesting off-the-radar noodle bar/grilled pig/braised pork knuckle places would be fun.

#2 Aaron T

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Posted 11 September 2006 - 06:46 PM

Check out this thread.

Perhaps Pim will share some other ideas.

I ate at Thanying (mentioned in the linked thread) and thought it was excellent.
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#3 balex

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 03:42 PM

Check out this thread.

Perhaps Pim will share some other ideas.

I ate at Thanying (mentioned in the linked thread) and thought it was excellent.


I have eaten there and thought it was very good but not great -- and very empty -- only a few tables occupied, all tourists.

#4 pim

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 05:19 PM

The special time to go to Than Ying is in the summer (March-May). Go for lunch and have the special Khao Chae. You'll see the restaurant full of Thai people then.

I had a great meal last time I was there, and heard from a lot of people that they have been revitalized. I sent some friends from France there a few weeks ago, and the report was disappointing again. How sad. When that kitchen performs to their ability the food can be heavenly.

I've got some stuff I wrote for Food & Wine a while ago on Bangkok. Will look for it and post here.

Oh no she didn't.

 

 


#5 balex

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 06:24 PM

Actually, this was a few years ago, so it might be worth a return visit, as I think I understand Thai food a little better now.

I am also going to Chiang Mai, but there I am with some very knowledgeable foodies so I will post something on what is good.

#6 Aaron T

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 01:07 AM

Article about street food in Bangkok in the NY Times here.

QUOTE
A decade ago, when I first moved to Bangkok, a friend who had emigrated there long before me let me in on a secret: the best food in Thailand is served by street vendors and at basic mom-and-pop restaurants.

"There just aren't many new "uptight" reservation places opening, especially in the neighborhoods where older, more sophisticated diners are trolling for youngish women." - Stone

My blog: Savory Hunter @ www.savoryhunter.com

#7 Behemoth

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Posted 15 January 2008 - 09:19 AM

We've decided to extend our stopover in Bangkok (on the way to NZ in July) to two full days. Normally I would just jump in with a little research but given the short amount of time, I would really like everything we do to be as sure a bet as possible. I'm looking at chezpim, realthai, various boards etc, but in the meantime any hotel and food recs from our reliable MF travellers would be very much appreciated. They can be fancy but don't have to be...mainly I would love any tips that would persuade A that we need to come back for a much longer visit.

I guess the standard requirements are that day meals need to be accessible from sightseeing areas, and such that we can manage with Western languages, pointing and nodding. Street or mall food for day meals, nicer places for evening. Any specific must-try (esp. in season, local) dish recommendations would also be appreciated. We loved the food in Korea so spice shouldn't be a problem. Indian or malaysian food would also be interesting. European, American or Middle Eastern not so much. wink.gif
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#8 Behemoth

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Posted 20 July 2008 - 10:19 AM

We were basically only there for two nights, so we didn't get to try a lot of stuff. Chote Chitr was as good as people say it is. My favorite was the banana flower salad, which had a rather addictive coconut cream, tamarind and (cashew?) dressing. Also the deep fried fish with some sort of "streusel" on top, accompanied by a green mango salad.

The 360 bar at the Millenium Hilton is really fabulous. All the seats are at the windows, hanging perilously over the river. The drinks are expensive of course, but good. There was a lightening storm while we were there which was amazing to watch from that height.

We basically used the ferry system to get around...the ferry station nearest the Grand Palace has a nice food market that really seems to get going towards the evening. We're definitely planning to go back, and to travel more extensively around the country. Apparently there are some really excellent snorkelling and diving sites.
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#9 balex

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Posted 20 January 2009 - 08:11 AM

I went to a few places in Bangkok on a recent trip that I can recommend:

Taling Pling: off Silom. Very long and interesting list with some unusual items. Also pictures of the food.
Cooking was accurate, service bad. It was also during an election so no alcohol was being served.
Duck with peanut sauce, softshell crabs, coconut soup with prawns.

Ban Klang Nam 1: famous seafood place down on the river. Magnificent grilled giant river prawns: the fat in the head liquifies, and with some rice and some of the garlic, lime and chilli sauce makes for a really delicious mouthful.

Maru: Japanese place near Thong lor. Some very good Matsusaka beef, grilled on a stone; some more beef sushi. Toro, baby crunchy crabs, a bunch of other things.

Sushicyu: nondescript shopping mall location, largely Japanese clientele, very good sushi. Wide range of very high quality fish and especially crustaceans. Significantly better than anything in London. The fish was up to Tokyo standards, but the rice, and the way it was handled let it down fractionally. Some buri, geoduck clams, akagai, hairy crab, aji tataki, toro, toro negi maki all very good.


Vientiane Kitchen: this is a north-eastern/Lao place that I have been to a few times before. The food was a bit weak this time, but we just caught the beginning of the ant egg season. Ant egg omelette, and a yam as well. Very good laabs of duck and of grilled pork. A good place for this sort of food.




#10 Wilfrid1

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Posted 20 January 2009 - 03:33 PM

Ant egg omelette. Okay, that's a new one on me. I am tempted to ask how many eggs...
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#11 balex

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Posted 20 January 2009 - 03:43 PM

Chicken egg omelette filled with ant eggs, to be clear.

We did crack a few jokes (ha!) along those lines while eating it. Ant eggs are about the size of plump grains of rice.

#12 Wilfrid1

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Posted 20 January 2009 - 03:44 PM

So it's a texture thing, like caviar?
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#13 balex

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Posted 20 January 2009 - 03:48 PM

Yes, you get a little pop, but not a burst of flavour, they are rather bland.

I am not sure I would describe caviar as a pure texture food. I quite like the taste too...

#14 Wilfrid1

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Posted 20 January 2009 - 04:22 PM

Right, I didn't put that very well.
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#15 balex

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Posted 30 August 2009 - 09:04 AM

A newish place in Bangkok called Bo.lan is worth a visit if you are in Bangkok. Not entirely succesful,
but they are trying hard to do high end, interesting, traditional Thai food, in a contemporary setting.

Some Australian guy from Nahm is the chef, together with someone else. It is very much better than Nahm though, which is fairly mediocre.
I liked it more than my host -- some friends who were coincidentally at another table the same night absolutely loved it.

Downsides -- clueless service, mediocre wine list, food maybe lacks some sparkle, but it beats other competing places in Bangkok.

On Sukhumvit Soi 26
Bo.lan