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#1 Wilfrid1

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Posted 15 March 2004 - 04:01 PM

I'll start the ball rolling with the fingerling potatoes I bought at Tompkins Square yesterday. I am very bad at remembering the names of stalls, but there are only half a dozen or so here (open Sundays), and I bought the potatoes from the vegetable stall at the bottom of the market.

I have repeatedly been disappointed by fancy little potatoes from various vendors at Union Square. These were great. Fingerling shaped, but not tiny; yellow waxy-fleshed. I peeled them, cooked them whole, then smashed them roughly and stirred in a knob of butter. I was moved to season them with a squeeze of lemon.

They tasted of potato. :o I'll definitely be buying these again.
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#2 omnivorette

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Posted 16 March 2004 - 05:54 PM

I have bought some cheeses from Cato Corner for several weeks in a row now - and I'm delighted with them. Especially "Stinking Bishop." Their cheeses have become our every day cheeses (I tend to have tea and cheese as my evening snack).
"It seems a positively Quixotic quest to defend food from being used as any kind of social signifier, as if it could avoid the fate of each other component of our everyday lives." -Wilfrid

#3 Liza

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Posted 19 March 2004 - 03:34 PM

Wait just a darn second here. (I've been on the site for five minutes and already I'm peeved. Bravo!)
"Stinking Bishop" is an English cheese. I gave a sample to the Cato folks last year and I guess they're making their own? It should be an incredibly runny cheese, by the way. Hope it is.
“And another thing. You don't have to "move on" either. Not until you're ready. People say, Oh, you should be grateful. They say, Oh, it's time for you to move on. I'm like, What are you, a cop with a nightstick? I'll move on when I'm done playing the blues on my harmonica, thank you very much.

Really, people will tell you all kinds of garbage. Don't believe it.

You don't have to move on until you're ready.”

#4 Wilfrid1

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Posted 19 March 2004 - 03:41 PM

I thought it sounded familiar.

I must say, I quickly tired of the Bobolink cheeses they were selling over at the First Avenue greenmarket. Tried each of them, and they were nice enough, but I think the only one I'd trouble to eat again was the curious pyramid aged in Zinfandel must. The others...yeah, fine, but European imports are better.
Elect-a-lujah

***Every Monday***At the Sign of the Pink Pig.

If the author could go around the place hitting random readers with a rubber hammer, the Pink Pig would still be worth a visit.

#5 Robert Schonfeld

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Posted 19 March 2004 - 03:55 PM

I agree about Bobolink. After sampling all their wares, including the bread, I don't really get the fuss. Maybe it's the infectious enthusiasm of the proprietor.

After years of passing them by for no particular reason, we've begun to buy from Cato Corners. Good things.
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#6 Vanessa

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Posted 19 March 2004 - 04:02 PM

Isn't there some kind of copyright on cheese names :angry: I believe the real Stinking Bishop is made in Scotland.

v
...it actually comes down to what thrills you - Hugh Johnson

authenticity is a fog that recedes just when you think you may be getting near it - R Schonfeld

The most political act we do on a daily basis is to eat - Prof J Pretty

this city without boundaries we all share - zigzackly


#7 Liza

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Posted 19 March 2004 - 04:23 PM

Same people make it's first cousin, Smack Ma Girdle. Which the class will recall is Stinking Bishop wrapped in nettles. Ah yes. Called Stinking Bishop after the pear juice it is washed with.
“And another thing. You don't have to "move on" either. Not until you're ready. People say, Oh, you should be grateful. They say, Oh, it's time for you to move on. I'm like, What are you, a cop with a nightstick? I'll move on when I'm done playing the blues on my harmonica, thank you very much.

Really, people will tell you all kinds of garbage. Don't believe it.

You don't have to move on until you're ready.”

#8 Vanessa

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Posted 19 March 2004 - 04:34 PM

Same people make it's first cousin, Smack Ma Girdle. Which the class will recall is Stinking Bishop wrapped in nettles. Ah yes. Called Stinking Bishop after the pear juice it is washed with.

I was quite wrongabout the Scottishness of Stinking Bishop - must have confounded it with another

edit: yes, I was confusing it with Bishop Kennedy :(

v
...it actually comes down to what thrills you - Hugh Johnson

authenticity is a fog that recedes just when you think you may be getting near it - R Schonfeld

The most political act we do on a daily basis is to eat - Prof J Pretty

this city without boundaries we all share - zigzackly


#9 Cathy

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Posted 19 March 2004 - 04:37 PM

I also agree about Bobolink. They have a stand at the small but lovely market near Lincoln Center on Saturdays. I picked up a slice of their Drumm cheese based on a small taste, and found I couldn't eat more than that when I got it home. The breads are beautiful but the rye loaf I bought was leaden and not very flavorful.

The Whites' daughter Paula, who was helping at the stand, is a sweetie.

Liza, where is Morse Pitts' stand at Union Square?
You're only as good as your grease.


When working with high heat, the first contact between the cooking surface and the food must be respected.

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#10 Liza

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Posted 19 March 2004 - 04:43 PM

Morse is next to the subway station on the Broadway side. He's got all the lovely greens in the bins.
One other thing about the cheese: I don't think it's right for one small, artisanal cheesemaker to 'borrow' the name of a cheese made by another small, artisanal cheesemaker.
“And another thing. You don't have to "move on" either. Not until you're ready. People say, Oh, you should be grateful. They say, Oh, it's time for you to move on. I'm like, What are you, a cop with a nightstick? I'll move on when I'm done playing the blues on my harmonica, thank you very much.

Really, people will tell you all kinds of garbage. Don't believe it.

You don't have to move on until you're ready.”

#11 Vanessa

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Posted 19 March 2004 - 04:45 PM

Smack ma Girdle is the name of a variety of cider apple.

v
...it actually comes down to what thrills you - Hugh Johnson

authenticity is a fog that recedes just when you think you may be getting near it - R Schonfeld

The most political act we do on a daily basis is to eat - Prof J Pretty

this city without boundaries we all share - zigzackly


#12 Wilfrid1

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Posted 19 March 2004 - 04:57 PM

Smack ma griddle is a way to burn your hand.
Elect-a-lujah

***Every Monday***At the Sign of the Pink Pig.

If the author could go around the place hitting random readers with a rubber hammer, the Pink Pig would still be worth a visit.

#13 Cathy

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Posted 19 March 2004 - 05:25 PM

Or a way to life in prison for matricide.
You're only as good as your grease.


When working with high heat, the first contact between the cooking surface and the food must be respected.

-- Francis Mallman







#14 omnivorette

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Posted 19 March 2004 - 05:34 PM

I think the Bobolink cheeses are dreadful. I used to think they were okay, but the last time I ordered from them the cheeses were urine-manure rancid messes, and I actually demanded my money back. There's a post I wrote on CH about this that I'll try to find.

I hope I'm right about the Cato cheese being called Stinking Bishop. I think that's right. In any case, the cheese is mighty good. Yes, pretty darn runny. I also really like their others: Brigid's Abby, Vivace...
"It seems a positively Quixotic quest to defend food from being used as any kind of social signifier, as if it could avoid the fate of each other component of our everyday lives." -Wilfrid

#15 Rail Paul

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Posted 24 March 2004 - 01:53 AM

I think the Bobolink cheeses are dreadful. I used to think they were okay, but the last time I ordered from them the cheeses were urine-manure rancid messes, and I actually demanded my money back. There's a post I wrote on CH about this that I'll try to find.

Bobolink has exceptionally variable cheeses, far more than I could attribute to the grasses, or the air temp, etc. I used to buy one or two each week at the green market, and the week to week variations were substantial.

Never had a urine smelling cheese, though. Sounds like a real turnoff


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