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New York greenmarkets


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#2866 bloviatrix

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 01:52 AM

There were new people behind the counter at Lani's today, but I'm not jumping to conclusions until I ask a couple of questions.


I also saw one of the regulars helping the restaurant folks when I was there in the early morning.
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#2867 Suzanne F

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 01:03 PM

Now that they're back at Tribeca, we still have some of the same people. My guess would be: new season, new help. Nothing more insidious. After all, a lot of the people who staff the booths are local (NYC) folks who just work the booth, not the farm.

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#2868 Suzanne F

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 02:37 PM

FYI: Alex/Blue Moon is supposed to return to the Tribeca market tomorrow (3/24). :D :D :D

The replacement fish guy's stuff was fine, and we enjoyed everything we got from him, but this is good news indeed. (It was he who told us last week about Alex returning.)

I try never to dine with other people. It just makes things so much easier. -- Anthony Bonner, March 28, 2014

 

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#2869 Suzanne F

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 07:39 PM

New Hipsterdom Amsterdam market restarted for the season today.

Their special thing this week was the Bread Pavilion, with 14? 15? "local bakeries" [including a few that I find questionable as such] presenting breads made with "local" grains:
Bakeri
Bread Alone
Bien Cuit
BR Guest [???]
Dean & Deluca Bakery
Grandaisy Bakery
Hot Bread Kitchen
Il Buco Alimentari
Janet's Quality Baked Goods
Le Pain Quotidien [???]
Nordic Breads
OGRIN & Greenmarket
Orwashers Bakery
Roberta's Bread
Runner and Stone
Sullivan Street Bakery

and Jim Lahey was demonstrating his worms pizza at a mobile oven.

Next week will have "International Meats Local, with the New York Vendy Awards."

Better than that, the last Sunday of each month has a pair of foragers from Fairlee, Vermont. They might be back sooner if the guy finds his patches of black morels.

I try never to dine with other people. It just makes things so much easier. -- Anthony Bonner, March 28, 2014

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#2870 Daisy

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 08:17 PM

Don't be a chain snob. Pain Quotidien makes an excellent baguette and I would say the same of their walnut bread.
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#2871 Suzanne F

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 09:41 PM

I'm not being snobby about them because they're a chain. I love their stuff, and sigh every time I have to pass one of their stores. I mean, yes, they have a central baking facility somewhere in the metropolitan area to service the stores, but that doesn't make them what I would consider a local bakery. They're no more than a set of local retail outlets of an international corporation. After all, I grew up in the days of having a bakery (i.e., a store that had ovens in the back and turned out fresh breads, rolls, cakes, cookies, and so on throughout the day) on the shopping stretch nearby, on the same block with the German delicatessen, the soda fountain, and the A&P (which nowadays would be laughably inadequate) and down the street from the butcher, the fish store, and the greengrocer. Now, that was local. As was the bakery we drove to in Glen Oaks because they made better cakes, or the bagel bakery in the same shopping center.

And BR Guest???:unsure:

I try never to dine with other people. It just makes things so much easier. -- Anthony Bonner, March 28, 2014

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#2872 Rail Paul

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 10:05 PM

Is Bread Alone a local bakery?

Boiceville is a ways up the river, and out in the forest.

They do produce excellent bread, though.

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#2873 StephanieL

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 12:50 AM

Is Bread Alone a local bakery?

Boiceville is a ways up the river, and out in the forest.

They do produce excellent bread, though.

They're always at the other Greenmarkets, so I guess so. The New Amsterdam Market gets vendors from as far away as Vermont.
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#2874 Suzanne F

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 08:29 PM

New Hipsterdom doesn't have the same rules that Greenmarkets do; it's not part of that system. I don't know what its criteria are. So I'm guessing it can define "local" any way it likes. In this case, it definitely extended as far as the Finger Lakes. (Re distance: note that Consider Bardwell from Vermont and Toigo from Pennsylvania are from pretty far away, but are at Greenmarkets.)

But yes, Bread Alone, Hot Bread Kitchen, and Nordic Bread are also at Greenmarkets, as are a couple of the other regular stands (Queens Farm Museum and Rick's Picks).

I try never to dine with other people. It just makes things so much easier. -- Anthony Bonner, March 28, 2014

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#2875 Anthony Bonner

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 08:31 PM

New Hipsterdom doesn't have the same rules that Greenmarkets do; it's not part of that system. I don't know what its criteria are. So I'm guessing it can define "local" any way it likes. In this case, it definitely extended as far as the Finger Lakes. (Re distance: note that Consider Bardwell from Vermont and Toigo from Pennsylvania are from pretty far away, but are at Greenmarkets.)

But yes, Bread Alone, Hot Bread Kitchen, and Nordic Bread are also at Greenmarkets, as are a couple of the other regular stands (Queens Farm Museum and Rick's Picks).

Well bread at the greenmarkets already all violate the letter of the law on what is and what is not local. Unless I've missed the wheat farming district of the Hudson Valley.
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#2876 Suzanne F

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 09:06 PM


New Hipsterdom doesn't have the same rules that Greenmarkets do; it's not part of that system. I don't know what its criteria are. So I'm guessing it can define "local" any way it likes. In this case, it definitely extended as far as the Finger Lakes. (Re distance: note that Consider Bardwell from Vermont and Toigo from Pennsylvania are from pretty far away, but are at Greenmarkets.)

But yes, Bread Alone, Hot Bread Kitchen, and Nordic Bread are also at Greenmarkets, as are a couple of the other regular stands (Queens Farm Museum and Rick's Picks).

Well bread at the greenmarkets already all violate the letter of the law on what is and what is not local. Unless I've missed the wheat farming district of the Hudson Valley.


It's not what we consider local; it's what GrowNYC says is within their radius for production, if not growing (assuming they do use that as a parameter). They're their markets, and their "law." If we could lure Liza back, she could probably give us a quick précis.

ETA: I know this sounds weird from me, having just complained about LPQ pretending to be a local bakery. But my objection to them was that they're actually international, not locally based. (And to BR Guest was that it's a restaurant group, not a producer that consumers can buy from directly.)

I try never to dine with other people. It just makes things so much easier. -- Anthony Bonner, March 28, 2014

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#2877 wingding

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 09:07 PM

I tasted quite a few,maybe too many breads....that loaf from Il Buco was as good as a simple bread might get....shattery crust,beautifully structured,tasty middle.With some good butter and some blackcurrant jam from Summers End Orchard [Ullaville?]or some similar name[near Cooperstown],bitta heaven
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#2878 Anthony Bonner

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 09:34 PM



New Hipsterdom doesn't have the same rules that Greenmarkets do; it's not part of that system. I don't know what its criteria are. So I'm guessing it can define "local" any way it likes. In this case, it definitely extended as far as the Finger Lakes. (Re distance: note that Consider Bardwell from Vermont and Toigo from Pennsylvania are from pretty far away, but are at Greenmarkets.)

But yes, Bread Alone, Hot Bread Kitchen, and Nordic Bread are also at Greenmarkets, as are a couple of the other regular stands (Queens Farm Museum and Rick's Picks).

Well bread at the greenmarkets already all violate the letter of the law on what is and what is not local. Unless I've missed the wheat farming district of the Hudson Valley.


It's not what we consider local; it's what GrowNYC says is within their radius for production, if not growing (assuming they do use that as a parameter). They're their markets, and their "law." If we could lure Liza back, she could probably give us a quick précis.

ETA: I know this sounds weird from me, having just complained about LPQ pretending to be a local bakery. But my objection to them was that they're actually international, not locally based. (And to BR Guest was that it's a restaurant group, not a producer that consumers can buy from directly.)

No - literally the wheat is not local. They bakers seem to get some special loophole - not only do they automatically get permitted to buy in their wheat, but they don't have to buy local wheat.

Like the won't allow an existing vendor to sell his whey to a pig farm next door, take the pigs and make salumi, but they'll allow a bread startup to buy commercial flour and make bread.
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#2879 Daisy

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 11:40 PM

I went to the New Amsterdam market today (and wow, that Fulton Street subway station is some mess!), and it was full of the sort of people you might expect--I ran into one of the former Marlow butchers who is now involved in something called Brooklyn Cured (lots of cured meats and charcuterie but of course) and Lockhart Steele was spied at the Luke's Lobster counter. Oh, and April Bloomfield, who's very nice and had just finished some demonstration where she'd been skinning and filleting fish. Today's market had a fishy theme and there were several purveyors there including Acme, a couple of guys from Long Island, and a fellow with a barrel of live tilapia one could fish out with a net. I am not making this up. Could not hang around to see how the tilapia were despatched because I was on a mission, a mission for Nordic Bread's whole wheat and rye ring. It was on my radar from several folks here, but I attended a cocktail thing last week where this bread was served and was so very impressed.

I walked home, thereby avoiding the dreadful snarl that is the station and enjoying this gorgeous day. Fulton and Front Streets to West Chelsea is a far piece and I was soon ravenous. A bit (actually about a quarter of the thing) of the Nordic bread and a glass of milk was the very thing. I think this bread with smoked fish or cheese and something stronger to drink, as I first sampled it, is even more delightful.

I also bought some sealed packages of smoked Alaskan wild salmon, King and Coho, from the Acme guy. They were inexpensive. Will report back.
Sardines aren't for sissies.---Frank Bruni
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The mistake one makes is to react to what people post rather than to what they mean.---Dr. Johnson
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I want to be the girl with the most cake.

#2880 Suzanne F

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 12:49 AM

So glad you got the Nordic stuff. It's clear you understand good bread, and that is one of the best: chewy, tangy, delicious on its own and as a vehicle for butter and/or cheese. BTW, it holds really well--we've sometimes had it on the counter (well wrapped but still breathing) for up to 10 days, and it was fine. How we managed to keep it that long without snarfing it all up I don't remember.

I try never to dine with other people. It just makes things so much easier. -- Anthony Bonner, March 28, 2014

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table