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British (and Irish) Delicacies


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#61 Behemoth

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Posted 14 November 2010 - 10:55 PM

I think the Hamburg version uses pickled beets. I would guess the matjes is also Hamburg-specific.
Summarizing, then, we assume that relational information is not subject to a corpus of utterance tokens upon which conformity has been defined by the paired utterance test.
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#62 Sneakeater

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Posted 15 November 2010 - 10:32 PM

They're even serving an NBCish version of labskaus in Brooklyn.
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#63 Behemoth

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Posted 16 November 2010 - 07:05 AM

They're even serving an NBCish version of labskaus in Brooklyn.


There really isn't any reason to leave NY, is there?
Summarizing, then, we assume that relational information is not subject to a corpus of utterance tokens upon which conformity has been defined by the paired utterance test.
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#64 Sneakeater

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Posted 16 November 2010 - 05:32 PM

Brooklyn has only one canal.
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#65 Wilfrid

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Posted 22 November 2010 - 04:20 PM

Not to debate just for the sake of it, but I think of Labskaus as a Scandinavian dish rather than a German dish. By origin I mean - of course it's eaten in Hamburg. Wikipedia disagrees with me. I must look in Elisabeth Luard when I get a chance.

#66 Anthony Bonner

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Posted 22 November 2010 - 04:23 PM

Not to debate just for the sake of it, but I think of Labskaus as a Scandinavian dish rather than a German dish. By origin I mean - of course it's eaten in Hamburg. Wikipedia disagrees with me. I must look in Elisabeth Luard when I get a chance.

can I get a Hanseatic dish?

Another possible source for the name could be Latvian Labs kausis, meaning 'good bowl' or hotpot, or Lithuanian labas káuszas, meaning the same.[5] The dish became a favorite of sailors and seamen during the time of the great ships and is now commonly served in restaurants on Germany's Northern coast.

Source for that is Der Spielgel fwiw.

no idea if its true but a pretty cool creation myth.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labskaus
Why not mayo?

#67 Wilfrid

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Posted 22 November 2010 - 04:33 PM

Clearly the seafaring connection is why Liverpool shares it with, er, Hanseatic countries.

#68 Wilfrid

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Posted 22 November 2010 - 04:35 PM

Inevitable digression. I've visited Lubeck. It's stunningly pretty. I recall praising its preserved mediaeval architectural treasures to a German academic. He responded that there were many more once, but that the RAF destroyed them. "Who invaded Poland?" I asked him. True story.

#69 Suzanne F

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Posted 22 November 2010 - 05:47 PM

Don't forget the book Lobscouse and Spotted Dog by Anne Grossman and Lisa Grossman Thomas (the latter a former eG member, Balmagowry), subtitled: Which It's a Gastronomic Companion to the Aubrey/Maturin Novels.

Most English dictionaries, while they do define Lobscouse as a sailor's stew or hash, don't seem to have any clear idea as to the word's derivation. "Of obscure origin," they say, or "origin unknown"--and then proceed to offer vague etymological connections to loblolly and Liverpool. We prefer to believe, as one source suggests, that Lobscouse began as a Nordic dish, as in the Norwegian lapskaus ("hodgepodge"), the Danish labskovs, or the Dutch/German labskaus. (Actually, the Norwegian dictionary says lapskaus comes from the English "lobscouse," while the Danish dictionary says labskovs comes from the Low German labskaus, which the German dictionary says comes from the English "lobscouse." It seems none of them is willing to take the credit.)

We have no proof of age for the dish, beyond the fact that the earliest known English reference to it dates from 1706; clearly, though, it is an old and well-established nautical tradition in several countries. As of 1970, lapskaus was on the official menu for the seamen's mess of the Norwegian-American Line--and to this day [1997] labskaus is so popular in the German port of Hamburg that some restaurants there serve nothing else. (Many of them garnish it with a fried egg, which in our minds only serves to underscore the resemblance between Lobscouse and modern corned beef hash.)

We challenge anyone to disprove our pet theory: that Lobscouse originated with the Vikings.


ETA: additional quote added to throw more fuel on the debate fire. :lol:

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#70 Wilfrid

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Posted 22 November 2010 - 05:53 PM

That's confused enough, isn't it? At least I wasn't imagining the Nordic theory.

#71 Sneakeater

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Posted 22 November 2010 - 10:49 PM

Inevitable digression. I've visited Lubeck. It's stunningly pretty. I recall praising its preserved mediaeval architectural treasures to a German academic. He responded that there were many more once, but that the RAF destroyed them. "Who invaded Poland?" I asked him. True story.


How many of us have not had that conversation in one form or another?
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#72 Sneakeater

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Posted 22 November 2010 - 10:51 PM


Not to debate just for the sake of it, but I think of Labskaus as a Scandinavian dish rather than a German dish. By origin I mean - of course it's eaten in Hamburg. Wikipedia disagrees with me. I must look in Elisabeth Luard when I get a chance.

can I get a Hanseatic dish?

Another possible source for the name could be Latvian Labs kausis, meaning 'good bowl' or hotpot, or Lithuanian labas káuszas, meaning the same.[5] The dish became a favorite of sailors and seamen during the time of the great ships and is now commonly served in restaurants on Germany's Northern coast.

Source for that is Der Spielgel fwiw.

no idea if its true but a pretty cool creation myth.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labskaus


I was going to propose it as an unsupported crackpot theory when I read Wilfrid's post.
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