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How do you read poetry?


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#16 Stone

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Posted 15 October 2004 - 06:56 PM

When you pick one, and have that glass of wine by your side, read it aloud....

I do like the idea of reading aloud. I read most of Paradise Lost aloud, with a terrible British accent.

#17 galleygirl

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Posted 15 October 2004 - 07:26 PM

When you pick one, and have that glass of wine by your side, read it aloud....

I do like the idea of reading aloud. I read most of Paradise Lost aloud, with a terrible British accent.

I find it helps make Shakespeare clearer....altho I didn't have a plausible accent.
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#18 Wilfrid1

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Posted 15 October 2004 - 07:33 PM

Okay, taking you seriously, as it's a Friday afternoon and I've nothing better to do: I think you can read a collection of poems by simply turning the pages once you have an idea of what effects the poet is looking for, how he/she gets them, and what the tone of voice is. I can't think of a better phrase than "tone of voice", but I find that I start making headway with a poet once I get some idea of what the poems typically "sound like". So my advice is to start by reading the shorter poems two or three times; maybe once through at regular speed, again slowly trying to figure out what is happening and why, and then again normally. But when you have done this for ten or a dozen poems, you may be able to go faster.

Specific tip with Stevens: don't get stuck trying to work out what point he is making. It's easy to do, because he writes in a somewhat scholarly, professorial tone, as if he's laying out an argument. He hardly ever is. Like other poems, these work primarily through association and imagery and mood; because they sometimes read like lectures, you may be misled into thinking something else is going on. This is not to say Stevens doesn't have ideas - he does. But don't get stuck looking for them everywhere.

Now, why haven't I seen you in Derrida class recently?
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#19 mongo_jones

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Posted 15 October 2004 - 07:43 PM

my advice would be to put stevens down for a while and begin instead with auden. and i speak as one who once had two different extracts from the same stevens poem in his signatures on two different sites.

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#20 g.johnson

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Posted 15 October 2004 - 07:43 PM

When you pick one, and have that glass of wine by your side, read it aloud....

I do like the idea of reading aloud. I read most of Paradise Lost aloud, with a terrible British accent.

I find it helps make Shakespeare clearer....altho I didn't have a plausible accent.

No one does. It might be something like this (from the site):

Frinds, Roomuns, coontrimun, lend me yurr eerrs.
Oy coom too berry Sayzurr, nut too preyze im.
Thee eevul that men doo livz aafturr theym,
The gewd iz awft inturrid with thyr boonz.
Soo et ut bee with Sayzurr. The nerbl Brootus
Eth toowld yu Sayzurr wuz ambishius.
If it ware soo, it wuz a greevus fawlt,
Und greevusly hath Sayzurr arnsserrd it.
Heerr, undr leeve uv Brootus un the rest
-- Fur Brootus iz un onawrubl mun --
Soo aar thay ol, ol onawrubl men --
Cum Oy too speek in Sayzurrs fyoonurrul.
Hee wuz mahy frind, faythful un djust too mee,
But Brootuz sez hee wuz ambishius,
Un Brootus iz un onawrubl mun.

I rather like "the nerbl Brootus".
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#21 Daisy

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Posted 15 October 2004 - 07:47 PM

When I tried to read that aloud, I sounded like Sean Connery.
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The mistake one makes is to react to what people post rather than to what they mean.---Dr. Johnson
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#22 galleygirl

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Posted 15 October 2004 - 08:01 PM

When I tried to read that aloud, I sounded like Sean Connery.

And that's a bad thing? :D
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#23 Stone

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Posted 15 October 2004 - 08:06 PM

When I tried to read that aloud, I sounded like Sean Connery.

But do you have the eyebrows?

#24 Daisy

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Posted 15 October 2004 - 08:06 PM

When I tried to read that aloud, I sounded like Sean Connery.

But do you have the eyebrows?

:D

No, thank God.
Sardines aren't for sissies.---Frank Bruni
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The mistake one makes is to react to what people post rather than to what they mean.---Dr. Johnson
-------------------------------------------------------------
I want to be the girl with the most cake.

#25 Stone

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Posted 15 October 2004 - 08:07 PM

Now, why haven't I seen you in Derrida class recently?

I decided to skip class and see the movie instead.

#26 Wilfrid1

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Posted 15 October 2004 - 08:10 PM

When I tried to read that aloud, I sounded like Sean Connery.

Not Jasper Carrott? (One for the Brits.)
Elect-a-lujah

***Every Monday***At the Sign of the Pink Pig.

If the author could go around the place hitting random readers with a rubber hammer, the Pink Pig would still be worth a visit.

#27 g.johnson

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Posted 15 October 2004 - 08:20 PM

Sounds more northern than midlands to me, even though WS was from Shropshire (assuming he wasn't the Earl of Oxford).

Cool site on the great vowel shift.
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#28 Wilfrid1

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Posted 15 October 2004 - 08:22 PM

Second attempt, it came out Geordie. The Bard on the Tyne is all mine, all mine...
Elect-a-lujah

***Every Monday***At the Sign of the Pink Pig.

If the author could go around the place hitting random readers with a rubber hammer, the Pink Pig would still be worth a visit.

#29 g.johnson

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Posted 15 October 2004 - 08:24 PM

There's some west country in there too -- oy, sayzurr.
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#30 Wilfrid1

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Posted 15 October 2004 - 08:25 PM

Mm, Joolie-arse Sayzurr. Drink up thy zider.
Elect-a-lujah

***Every Monday***At the Sign of the Pink Pig.

If the author could go around the place hitting random readers with a rubber hammer, the Pink Pig would still be worth a visit.