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#16 Lippy

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 07:10 PM

QUOTE(Carolyn Tillie @ Jan 4 2010, 02:09 PM) View Post
QUOTE(Lippy @ Jan 4 2010, 11:01 AM) View Post
QUOTE(SLBunge @ Jan 4 2010, 01:44 PM) View Post
To all of you who want scrapers: they do work very well but you might want to be sure that you have a pouring shield in place when you use it. I think it tends to make additions of flour much more exciting.


The pouring shield is also a must, with or without the scraper (one of which I am going to acquire one of these days.)


Hmmm... I got one with my set and ended up discarding or losing it, finding it got in the way too much.


I don't use it all the time, but I do for those recipes that look as if they are going to make the mixer spew flour all over the kitchen if I don't.

#17 GG Mora

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 07:16 PM

QUOTE(Carolyn Tillie @ Jan 4 2010, 02:09 PM) View Post
QUOTE(Lippy @ Jan 4 2010, 11:01 AM) View Post
QUOTE(SLBunge @ Jan 4 2010, 01:44 PM) View Post
To all of you who want scrapers: they do work very well but you might want to be sure that you have a pouring shield in place when you use it. I think it tends to make additions of flour much more exciting.


The pouring shield is also a must, with or without the scraper (one of which I am going to acquire one of these days.)


Hmmm... I got one with my set and ended up discarding or losing it, finding it got in the way too much.

I used mine once or twice and then threw it away. When I need a shield, I simply wrap a kitchen towel around the top of the bowl, secure the sides with my wrists, and reach up with a finger to switch the machine on. Then I can pull it away after one or two turns. Much less cumbersome.



#18 SLBunge

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 07:24 PM

I use the pour shield a lot, particularly for feeding flour into the bowl as it is mixing. It doesn't seem that much of a bother to put it in place or move it out of the way.

Also, keep in mind that when you use the scraping blade you no longer have to move the pour shield to scrape the sides of the bowl.
Suffocating under a pile of cheese curds.

#19 KRamsey

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 07:34 PM

I'll say what I always say: Buy a vintage machine, not a new one.

#20 splinky

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 07:50 PM

QUOTE(KRamsey @ Jan 4 2010, 02:34 PM) View Post
I'll say what I always say: Buy a vintage machine, not a new one.

if you can, that's a good idea. estate sales are a good place to start

“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*

 


#21 Suzanne F

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 07:52 PM

QUOTE(SLBunge @ Jan 4 2010, 11:26 AM) View Post
I agree that they are built-to-last, but I think that kneading a bread dough ball is asking a lot from a mixer. Irregular forces like you get when that dough-hook spins around and slaps the dough are not very friendly to bearings and gears. Use your hands for that.

I still find lots of uses for my 16 year old KA mixer and wouldn't want to give it up.


This is sort of a it's-good-and-it's-bad thing. The newer KA mixers have a lot of power, and can easily handle bread dough. But I also suspect that they aren't built as well as the older ones. (That's just a gut feeling; nothing to back up the claim.) So maybe a new KA can do it, but maybe not over as a long a lifespan as an old one.

That said, these days there is a movement among bread scientists to minimize kneading time, since it functions more to oxidize ingredients than to improve the dough. (See the bread chapter in Bakewise, esp. page 433.) No-knead breads are not anything less in quality than "real" kneaded breads. Abby, please don't be a bread-baking snob. If you are regularly baking bread, there is nothing wrong with using a machine to do the time-consuming or harder physical work (I find the mixing much more difficult than kneading, in any case). Do you butcher your own bacon? Do you pick and roast your own coffee? Why must you use brute force on your bread? laugh.gif Artisanal bakeries don't; they use mixers and still produce a fine product (I'm thinking of one like Amy's).

I try never to dine with other people. It just makes things so much easier. -- Anthony Bonner, March 28, 2014

 

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#22 Cathy

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 07:56 PM

QUOTE(Lippy @ Jan 4 2010, 02:01 PM) View Post
QUOTE(SLBunge @ Jan 4 2010, 01:44 PM) View Post
To all of you who want scrapers: they do work very well but you might want to be sure that you have a pouring shield in place when you use it. I think it tends to make additions of flour much more exciting.


The pouring shield is also a must, with or without the scraper (one of which I am going to acquire one of these days.)


This is non-negotiable. You need a beater blade!
You're only as good as your grease.


When working with high heat, the first contact between the cooking surface and the food must be respected.

-- Francis Mallman







#23 splinky

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 07:59 PM

just finished an experimental loaf of gluten free brioche in my KA. it's rising now.mixing heavy batter is exactrly the kind of task that the KJA is perfect for

“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*

 


#24 Abbylovi

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 08:12 PM

This weekend when I mixed my brioche dough in my Cuisinart, first of all the machine seized up for the first time ever. I really got scared that I had killed it. Then when I had to clean it, I wished that I had killed it.
It is better to have beans and bacon in peace than cakes and ale in fear.

#25 SLBunge

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 08:13 PM

QUOTE(Suzanne F @ Jan 4 2010, 01:52 PM) View Post
QUOTE(SLBunge @ Jan 4 2010, 11:26 AM) View Post
I agree that they are built-to-last, but I think that kneading a bread dough ball is asking a lot from a mixer. Irregular forces like you get when that dough-hook spins around and slaps the dough are not very friendly to bearings and gears. Use your hands for that.

I still find lots of uses for my 16 year old KA mixer and wouldn't want to give it up.


This is sort of a it's-good-and-it's-bad thing. The newer KA mixers have a lot of power, and can easily handle bread dough. But I also suspect that they aren't built as well as the older ones. (That's just a gut feeling; nothing to back up the claim.) So maybe a new KA can do it, but maybe not over as a long a lifespan as an old one.

That said, these days there is a movement among bread scientists to minimize kneading time, since it functions more to oxidize ingredients than to improve the dough. (See the bread chapter in Bakewise, esp. page 433.) No-knead breads are not anything less in quality than "real" kneaded breads. Abby, please don't be a bread-baking snob. If you are regularly baking bread, there is nothing wrong with using a machine to do the time-consuming or harder physical work (I find the mixing much more difficult than kneading, in any case). Do you butcher your own bacon? Do you pick and roast your own coffee? Why must you use brute force on your bread? laugh.gif Artisanal bakeries don't; they use mixers and still produce a fine product (I'm thinking of one like Amy's).

Commercial bakeries do use large mixers for mixing and kneading bread dough. They have far more substantial drive train equipment and they know Hobart maintenance technicians who come when they call.
Suffocating under a pile of cheese curds.

#26 splinky

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 08:16 PM

QUOTE(Abbylovi @ Jan 4 2010, 03:12 PM) View Post
This weekend when I mixed my brioche dough in my Cuisinart, first of all the machine seized up for the first time ever. I really got scared that I had killed it. Then when I had to clean it, I wished that I had killed it.

i pretty much only use my cuisinart for pie dough during the holidays. i'm a hand chopper, grater type and i love using my mandoline. i learned to cook and bake from my nana who really only used one electric tool, a pink mixmaster that's older than me and unlike me, still works.

“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*

 


#27 SethG

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 08:46 PM

My anecdotal evidence with regards to KitchenAid mixers is:

1) They ain't what they used to be; and

2) bread dough isn't the best idea.

We were given a KA mixer when we got married, but didn't use it really at all until I suddenly got into baking a few years later. Then, probably the third or fourth time I ever used the machine, the gears got stripped when I tried to use the mixer for some basic bread dough. I called KitchenAid but we were out of warranty, so they would do nothing for me. Miffed, I bought a DeLonghi stand mixer that I've felt fine with ever since. I still don't like to do bread dough in the machine, though, in part because of my experience with the KitchenAid and in part because I just don't like to make bread dough that way.
Why yes, I do have a rock climbing blog! Climb and Punishment

#28 SethG

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 08:47 PM

QUOTE(splinky @ Jan 4 2010, 03:16 PM) View Post
i pretty much only use my cuisinart for pie dough during the holidays...


OMG Splink wash your mouth out with soap! Make pie dough by hand!!

ETA: Actually, I take that back; it depends on the type of dough you are making.
Why yes, I do have a rock climbing blog! Climb and Punishment

#29 splinky

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 09:19 PM

QUOTE(SethG @ Jan 4 2010, 03:47 PM) View Post
QUOTE(splinky @ Jan 4 2010, 03:16 PM) View Post
i pretty much only use my cuisinart for pie dough during the holidays...


OMG Splink wash your mouth out with soap! Make pie dough by hand!!

ETA: Actually, I take that back; it depends on the type of dough you are making.

thanks for your kind understanding, seth. i only use it during bulk pie making season and it does work better for some crusts than others. i always finish on a floured board or marble, anyway.

“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*

 


#30 SethG

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 09:42 PM

QUOTE(splinky @ Jan 4 2010, 04:19 PM) View Post
QUOTE(SethG @ Jan 4 2010, 03:47 PM) View Post
QUOTE(splinky @ Jan 4 2010, 03:16 PM) View Post
i pretty much only use my cuisinart for pie dough during the holidays...


OMG Splink wash your mouth out with soap! Make pie dough by hand!!

ETA: Actually, I take that back; it depends on the type of dough you are making.

thanks for your kind understanding, seth. i only use it during bulk pie making season and it does work better for some crusts than others. i always finish on a floured board or marble, anyway.


I'm sorry, please forgive my judgmental outburst.
Why yes, I do have a rock climbing blog! Climb and Punishment