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#16 Adrian

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Posted 27 January 2010 - 11:56 PM

QUOTE(Sneakeater @ Jan 27 2010, 08:45 PM) View Post
QUOTE(AaronS @ Jan 27 2010, 08:44 PM) View Post
QUOTE(Sneakeater @ Jan 27 2010, 03:22 PM) View Post
this was clearly a higher-quality product than Katz's -- although IT DOESN'T TASTE BETTER.
What other qualities are relevant?


Grade and texture of the meat. Moistness. Tenderness.


I haven't been, but two points:

1. The "Wilensky" is named after Wilensky's Light Lunch, a small diner on St. Viatuer made famous by Mordecai Richler in The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz. The sandwich at the original deli is pressed swiss cheese, all beef salami, mustard, and bologna on an onion roll. It's a charming anachronism but it's not worth a special journey, as they say.

2. Sometimes the artisanal version misses the point. I had poutine at T-Poutine for the first time the other night - the dish took the guy ten minutes to make. He tossed the cheese curds with the the gravy in a pan and poured it over fresh, crispy fries. It was a total failure. The fries in real poutine are skin on and half soggy and the cheese curds are not melted. It's a slapdash dish and that's what makes it great. You're supposed to be able to jam fifty fries and twenty cheese curds on a plastic fork and jam it into your mouth. Your not supposed to twirl melted cheese daintily around a crispy fry. Sometimes, extra refinement is detrimental.

I think you need to interpret what I'm saying in a reasonable way.


#17 Wilfrid

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 12:12 AM

QUOTE(juuceman @ Jan 27 2010, 10:37 PM) View Post
ETA - Montero's?? Why??


Because.

I am wondering about my ability to eat a smoked meat sandwich and a turkey leg sandwich on the same trip. smile.gif

#18 Sneakeater

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 12:12 AM

QUOTE(Adrian @ Jan 27 2010, 11:56 PM) View Post
2. Sometimes the artisanal version misses the point. I had poutine at T-Poutine for the first time the other night - the dish took the guy ten minutes to make. He tossed the cheese curds with the the gravy in a pan and poured it over fresh, crispy fries. It was a total failure. The fries in real poutine are skin on and half soggy and the cheese curds are not melted. It's a slapdash dish and that's what makes it great. You're supposed to be able to jam fifty fries and twenty cheese curds on a plastic fork and jam it into your mouth. Your not supposed to twirl melted cheese daintily around a crispy fry. Sometimes, extra refinement is detrimental.


I VERY MUCH agree with you that artisinal versions of vernacular dishes often -- I'd even say usually -- miss the point. They end up being much less tasty than the original -- and unnecessarily fussier to boot.

I don't think that's the case here. And the reason I don't, I think, might be that smoked meat just isn't as junky as poutine, or cheesesteak, or other dishes that are ruined by the artisinal approach. Smoked meat is more like "real" food than those vernacular dishes, and so can benefit by being treated like "real" food. Perhaps it's more like pizza, or even macaroni and cheese, which can be improved by the artisinal approach.
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#19 Suzanne F

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 01:28 AM

QUOTE(Sneakeater @ Jan 27 2010, 07:12 PM) View Post
<snip> Perhaps it's more like pizza, or even macaroni and cheese, which can be improved by the artisinal approach.


Artisanal ingredients, probably. Artisanal approach? blink.gif ohmy.gif Oh, noz!

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#20 Daniel

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 04:09 AM

Such great news. Very happy for all parties involved. us and them plus the sandwiches that bind us.
Ason, I keep planets in orbit.

#21 Wilfrid

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 04:50 AM

QUOTE(Adrian @ Jan 27 2010, 11:56 PM) View Post
2. Sometimes the artisanal version misses the point. I had poutine at T-Poutine for the first time the other night - the dish took the guy ten minutes to make. He tossed the cheese curds with the the gravy in a pan and poured it over fresh, crispy fries. It was a total failure. The fries in real poutine are skin on and half soggy and the cheese curds are not melted. It's a slapdash dish and that's what makes it great. You're supposed to be able to jam fifty fries and twenty cheese curds on a plastic fork and jam it into your mouth. Your not supposed to twirl melted cheese daintily around a crispy fry. Sometimes, extra refinement is detrimental.


Ah sweet mystery.

Here is an exchange on Chowhound where I reply to someone who had the opposite complaint - cold curds at T'Poutine.

My several experiences there have been as okay as one might hope.

#22 Stone

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 08:53 PM

What does the NBC stand for?

And she was.


#23 Sneakeater

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 09:01 PM

New Brooklyn Cuisine
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#24 Wilfrid

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 09:07 PM

Grilled peacock, and so on.

#25 Lex

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 09:12 PM

I was a little put off that at Henry Public they refer to "hamburger sandwiches." To the untrained eye they could pass as standard burgers.


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#26 Wilfrid

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 09:18 PM

Far be it from me to be argumentative, but it's not too unusual to see hamburgers listed in sandwich sections of diner menus, is it? Or is the fact that this is a retro gesture which rankles?

#27 Lex

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 09:34 PM

QUOTE(Wilfrid @ Jan 28 2010, 04:18 PM) View Post
Far be it from me to be argumentative, but it's not too unusual to see hamburgers listed in sandwich sections of diner menus, is it? Or is the fact that this is a retro gesture which rankles?

It's precious, pure and simple. Next summer head out to Nathan's in Coney Island. Ask them for a frankfurter sandwich and see what kind of look you get.

“I have a dream of a multiplicity of pastramis.”

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#28 Sneakeater

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Posted 29 January 2010 - 12:28 AM

It's not surprising that the Eater round-up of early notices of Mile High reports several complaints that the sandwiches are too small. Only one notes that they're much cheaper than at standard NYC delis. I guess people WANT to buy something that's much too big to eat.

I think the reasonable sandwich size here is a positive good.
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#29 Wilfrid

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Posted 29 January 2010 - 05:31 AM

And leaves room for a turkey leg sandwich later. smile.gif

#30 weinoo

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Posted 29 January 2010 - 02:47 PM

QUOTE(Sneakeater @ Jan 29 2010, 12:28 AM) View Post
It's not surprising that the Eater round-up of early notices of Mile High reports several complaints that the sandwiches are too small. Only one notes that they're much cheaper than at standard NYC delis. I guess people WANT to buy something that's much too big to eat.

I think the reasonable sandwich size here is a positive good.

Of course you're right on the size of sandwiches, Sneak. As we've agreed upon in the past, sandwiches should be as much about the bread as about what's inside the bread.

So, nu, what kind of bread are they using? And, is it any good?