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[CHI] Next, a new restaurant from Grant Achatz


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#1 Rail Paul

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Posted 04 May 2010 - 03:10 PM

From a Grant Achatz twitter

QUOTE
The video anouncement hints at the following destinations/time periods: Paris 1912, Hong Kong 2036, Sicily 1949, Sao Paulo 1968, Ayutthaya 1767 and Cajun 1977. All of these dinners will be ticketed events. The official release, via the restaurant's website:
Info about the bar, plus the video announcement.>>>

Next Restaurant will explore world cuisine. It is being developed by chef Grant Achatz, Nick Kokonas, and the creative team that built Alinea, including Crucial Detail designer Martin Kastner, Architect Steve Rugo, and Interior Designer Tom Stringer.

Next Restaurant will serve four menus per year from great moments in culinary history – or the future. Our team of chefs will investigate, test, refine, and present authentic menu interpretations from cultures, places and times. Depending on the cuisine, meals will be 5 to 6 courses and will include food, beverage pairings, and service.


Two new places

“Jazz musicians just get better and better as the years go by. I think chefs are the same way. You know who you are.”

 

...Jonathan Waxman


#2 prasantrin

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Posted 09 July 2011 - 11:52 PM

The 2nd menu at Next will be modern Thai.



Tickets are currently sold out, so I can't even see how much tickets are. I heard somewhere around $100 per person, but I'm not sure if that includes beverage pairings.

#3 tsquare

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Posted 10 July 2011 - 12:30 AM

The 2nd menu at Next will be modern Thai.

http://youtu.be/_PutllXDCUE

Tickets are currently sold out, so I can't even see how much tickets are. I heard somewhere around $100 per person, but I'm not sure if that includes beverage pairings.


Facebook page says $100 per person plus pairings. Looks good to me. Hope Shophouse, Seattle is paying attention!

#4 TaliesinNYC

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 01:19 AM

Hors d’oeuvres included a beautiful torchon of foie gras encased in brioche as well as truffled egg custard with salt cod and caviar, and a sphere of quail egg topped with anchovy, red onion, tarragon, chervil and a strand of lemon zest, the lot of them served on a wide platter meant to evoke the grand-buffet style that Escoffier developed along with his own Nick Kokonas, the hotelier César Ritz.

There was turtle soup to follow, a consommé as rich and honeyed as liquid gold, with hints of Madeira behind the meat (this was paired sublimely with dry and lightly oxidized wine from the Jura). The waiter said the turtle was thought to have medicinal qualities, and the soup was meant to gird our stomachs for the coming feast.

Certainly girding was needed. Sole arrived on the table next. It came accompanied by baubles: crayfish stuffed with a mousseline of crayfish and sole; a mushroom stuffed with crayfish; a tab of fried sole roe. The entire plate was napped in fragrant sauce Nantua, a simple affair of béchamel, cream and crayfish butter. The dish might have appeared in an A. J. Liebling dispatch for The New Yorker. Surely ortolans and claret would follow.

Instead: a quadrangle of silken chicken cooked sous-vide and painted with a blanquette sauce run through with foie gras, accompanied by poached cucumber rounds stuffed with chicken mousse and wrapped with house-cured pork belly. Instead: roasted lamb over lamb rillettes, topped by lamb sweetbreads, topped in turn by onion rings, accompanied by rosy choron sauce and a sticky pool of lamb demi-glace. Instead: duck à la presse, with buttery dauphine potatoes, as if served by Mr. Ritz himself.



Wonder how soon we'll see Next NYC.

http://www.nytimes.c...pagewanted=1

#5 jmoranmoya

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 12:48 AM

Hors d’oeuvres included a beautiful torchon of foie gras encased in brioche as well as truffled egg custard with salt cod and caviar, and a sphere of quail egg topped with anchovy, red onion, tarragon, chervil and a strand of lemon zest, the lot of them served on a wide platter meant to evoke the grand-buffet style that Escoffier developed along with his own Nick Kokonas, the hotelier César Ritz.

There was turtle soup to follow, a consommé as rich and honeyed as liquid gold, with hints of Madeira behind the meat (this was paired sublimely with dry and lightly oxidized wine from the Jura). The waiter said the turtle was thought to have medicinal qualities, and the soup was meant to gird our stomachs for the coming feast.

Certainly girding was needed. Sole arrived on the table next. It came accompanied by baubles: crayfish stuffed with a mousseline of crayfish and sole; a mushroom stuffed with crayfish; a tab of fried sole roe. The entire plate was napped in fragrant sauce Nantua, a simple affair of béchamel, cream and crayfish butter. The dish might have appeared in an A. J. Liebling dispatch for The New Yorker. Surely ortolans and claret would follow.

Instead: a quadrangle of silken chicken cooked sous-vide and painted with a blanquette sauce run through with foie gras, accompanied by poached cucumber rounds stuffed with chicken mousse and wrapped with house-cured pork belly. Instead: roasted lamb over lamb rillettes, topped by lamb sweetbreads, topped in turn by onion rings, accompanied by rosy choron sauce and a sticky pool of lamb demi-glace. Instead: duck à la presse, with buttery dauphine potatoes, as if served by Mr. Ritz himself.


Hey, does anybody know when ticket for El Bulli tribute at Next will become available. This sounds like one of the most interesting event of the year.
Thanks
Info here: http://chicago.grubs...es_at_next.html


Wonder how soon we'll see Next NYC.

http://www.nytimes.c...pagewanted=1



#6 Orik

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 03:09 PM

Did the El Bulli (Or really El Boozy given how much wine was poured) thing last night. Brilliant food, lots of fun, although I can't say I remember anything past the 24th dish or so. Jose, did you end up going?
I never said that

#7 Jesikka

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 01:00 AM

Also loved it. So interesting to see how the dishes evolved over time. I am so impressed by how the kitchen manages to stay true to the style of the cuisine. This was clearly Spanish molecular gastronomy and the salt level was significantly greater than Alinea's usual flavor profile. Interesting to see a lot of Asian flavors as well- in particular a lot of coconut milk and a rabbit dish that would have been right at home in a sichuan restaurant (minus the smears of foie sauce).

#8 Sneakeater

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 02:01 AM

Also loved it. Will post at more length when I can remember anything. That was a LOT of alcohol they served. (They said you weren't expected to finish every pour. But somehow, one did.)
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#9 Jesikka

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 11:24 PM

Also loved it. Will post at more length when I can remember anything. That was a LOT of alcohol they served. (They said you weren't expected to finish every pour. But somehow, one did.)


I think it is worthwhile to note that this organization is by far the best at pairings that I've experienced. They moved seamlessly between wine and beer and sake and cocktails- not an easy feat. I'm actually curious to know from folks who have eaten at El Bulli how this part compares. I remember that the first time I ate at Alinea, I was blown away by the thoughtfulness and quality of the pairings- especially for the price. It wasn't as though we were having all beverages I've never had or seen, but they just went together very nicely and added a lot to the experience.

#10 Sneakeater

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 02:36 AM

Strongly agree.

(I'm sure the wine pairings were also great, but it's hard to see how they could compete with the mixed pairings in terms of both interest and -- amazingly -- appropriateness.)
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#11 Nathan

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 09:42 PM

I think I recall my first pairing at Alinea being a cocktail....followed by 16 pours of wine....

but, yes, they do a magnificent job...
Blatantly Obvious Disclaimer:

My opinions are obviously my personal opinions. Not yours. Not universal.