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[Bay Area] Manresa


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#256 ngatti

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Posted 06 May 2010 - 07:11 PM

QUOTE(Cathy @ May 4 2010, 01:47 PM) View Post
QUOTE(Aaron T @ May 4 2010, 01:47 PM) View Post
QUOTE(Daisy @ May 4 2010, 07:18 AM) View Post
Congratulations to David Kinch on his James Beard award. Well done, and, deserved.


What she said. smile.gif



What they said.


you were missed.
yer 'avin' a larf, mate

#257 Cathy

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Posted 06 May 2010 - 08:33 PM

Who, me?

I heard T to T was great! And I have huge respect for anyone who can handle Claire. wink.gif
You're only as good as your grease.


When working with high heat, the first contact between the cooking surface and the food must be respected.

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#258 Daisy

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 02:48 PM

Some lucky New Yorkers last night attended the first of four meals at the James Beard Foundation pop-up in Chelsea Market cooked by David Kinch and John Paul Carmona of Manresa. We were greeted with glasses of champagne and then sat at communal tables. First course of 'green garden gazpacho and almond milk ice, pickled green strawberries,vegetable beignets'. This was herbacious and delicate, the pickled strawberries were lovely both to behold and in texture. The beignets provided a hot,crisp and salty (some felt too salty but I enjoyed it) contrast. Then we were served the dish of the evening, 'romaine and abalone salad,grilled cucumber,avocado with "norinade" '. David Kinch cooks abalone like no one else. Tender within, crisped and brown without and admirably partnered by the avocado and silken nori emulsion. We posited that the abalone had been cooked sous vide and then finished in a pan but I confess that by the time I caught up with the chef it was after midnight and we were at a very crowded party at The Box and ....I forgot. Blame the champagne. The main course, served family style in generous portions, was 'suckling porcelet,whey polenta,rhubarb,hazlenut,spring onions'. I usually find polenta stodgy but this version was silken and delicious and the ideal sponge for the savory juices of the little pig. The meat was tender and faintly rosy, the skin crackling, and the bits of deeply bronzed belly meaty and succulent. I am not a fan of pork belly unless it is cooked to a turn, but this was executed perfectly. Dessert was very simple and a lot of fun--big, billowing golden popovers which we gleefully tore apart, slathering the still steaming innards with deeply pink hibiscus berry butter. Messy and fabulous.

Wines, generously poured, were provided by Delta Airlines, chosen by Andrea Robinson,and were OK to good (the champagne, Veuve de V-----, can't recall, quite nice). Boulder Bank sauvignon blanc from New Zealand (quite nice), Chateau St Jean Chardonnay (very buttery,oaky,vanilla-tinged, i.e. everything I don't like about California chards but actually worked quite well with the abalone) and a Patz and Hall pinot noir from the Sonoma coast which was a little too berry-ish and lacked structure.

We were given little packets of lovely pistachio shortbread cookies to take home. With some strong Darjeeling they made an admirable breakfast
Sardines aren't for sissies.---Frank Bruni
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The mistake one makes is to react to what people post rather than to what they mean.---Dr. Johnson
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I want to be the girl with the most cake.

#259 Lippy

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 02:59 PM

Thanks for that report! I wish I had known about this in time to get a reservation, if, indeed, that was ever possible for us regular folks.

#260 Daisy

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 03:02 PM

Events like this are why I am a religious reader of Eater. Which is how I learned of it. I logged on to the JBF site the moment the tickets went on sale and scored four. Although I am told by my friends I have either insane amounts of luck or mad skillz when it comes to scoring hard-to-get tickets and reservations. I forgot to mention that this wonderful meal was $83 which we all thought a screaming bargain.
Sardines aren't for sissies.---Frank Bruni
------------------------------------------------------------
The mistake one makes is to react to what people post rather than to what they mean.---Dr. Johnson
-------------------------------------------------------------
I want to be the girl with the most cake.

#261 Lippy

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 03:07 PM

That's what I get for being only a sporadic reader of Eater. :( I agree, the meal sounds like a bargain.

#262 Rich

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 03:48 PM

, chosen by Andrea Robinson,and were OK to good (the champagne, Veuve de V-----, can't recall, quite nice). Boulder Bank sauvignon blanc from New Zealand (quite nice), Chateau St Jean Chardonnay (very buttery,oaky,vanilla-tinged, i.e. everything I don't like about California chards but actually worked quite well with the abalone) and a Patz and Hall pinot noir from the Sonoma coast which was a little too berry-ish and lacked structure.

Nice report Daisy. And admire your ability to get tickets. I tried for several but never got lucky.

The Boulder Bank is a terrific SB. The Chateau St. Jean Chardonnay is exactly as you described - just can't get myself to drink it.

The interesting wine should have been the Patz & Hall PN. It's always been one of my favorite New World Pinots. Never noticed the lack of structure of over-berried nature of it. Do you recall the vintage? I think if this was the '08, some micro-climates were much warmer than normal, which would account for the berriness if not picked at the perfect time.

#263 Daisy

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 03:59 PM


, chosen by Andrea Robinson,and were OK to good (the champagne, Veuve de V-----, can't recall, quite nice). Boulder Bank sauvignon blanc from New Zealand (quite nice), Chateau St Jean Chardonnay (very buttery,oaky,vanilla-tinged, i.e. everything I don't like about California chards but actually worked quite well with the abalone) and a Patz and Hall pinot noir from the Sonoma coast which was a little too berry-ish and lacked structure.

Nice report Daisy. And admire your ability to get tickets. I tried for several but never got lucky.

The Boulder Bank is a terrific SB. The Chateau St. Jean Chardonnay is exactly as you described - just can't get myself to drink it.

The interesting wine should have been the Patz & Hall PN. It's always been one of my favorite New World Pinots. Never noticed the lack of structure of over-berried nature of it. Do you recall the vintage? I think if this was the '08, some micro-climates were much warmer than normal, which would account for the berriness if not picked at the perfect time.

It was the '07. When it was first poured the berry notes were quite forward. Leaving it in the glass for a while so that it could open a bit, it on second tasting 'fell a bit flat' as one of my companions put it.
Sardines aren't for sissies.---Frank Bruni
------------------------------------------------------------
The mistake one makes is to react to what people post rather than to what they mean.---Dr. Johnson
-------------------------------------------------------------
I want to be the girl with the most cake.

#264 Rich

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 04:06 PM



, chosen by Andrea Robinson,and were OK to good (the champagne, Veuve de V-----, can't recall, quite nice). Boulder Bank sauvignon blanc from New Zealand (quite nice), Chateau St Jean Chardonnay (very buttery,oaky,vanilla-tinged, i.e. everything I don't like about California chards but actually worked quite well with the abalone) and a Patz and Hall pinot noir from the Sonoma coast which was a little too berry-ish and lacked structure.

Nice report Daisy. And admire your ability to get tickets. I tried for several but never got lucky.

The Boulder Bank is a terrific SB. The Chateau St. Jean Chardonnay is exactly as you described - just can't get myself to drink it.

The interesting wine should have been the Patz & Hall PN. It's always been one of my favorite New World Pinots. Never noticed the lack of structure of over-berried nature of it. Do you recall the vintage? I think if this was the '08, some micro-climates were much warmer than normal, which would account for the berriness if not picked at the perfect time.

It was the '07. When it was first poured the berry notes were quite forward. Leaving it in the glass for a while so that it could open a bit, it on second tasting 'fell a bit flat' as one of my companions put it.

Haven't had the '07 in about a year, but that was one of their best in my opinion. Maybe some bad bottles or storage or the extra year didn't serve it well.

#265 Lippy

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 05:11 PM

That's what I get for being only a sporadic reader of Eater.

However, I'm glad I read it today...[digression, carry on]

#266 Evelyn

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Posted 23 November 2011 - 04:35 AM

Congratulations to David Kinch, GQ's Chef of the Year.

I dined at Manresa last week. The remodel of the restaurant is gorgeous. The food is stellar. I am always amazed that each time I go, I think it can't get any better. Then I return, and the bar is raised yet again :) .

#267 Lippy

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Posted 23 November 2011 - 02:19 PM

Congratulations to David Kinch, GQ's Chef of the Year.

I dined at Manresa last week. The remodel of the restaurant is gorgeous. The food is stellar. I am always amazed that each time I go, I think it can't get any better. Then I return, and the bar is raised yet again :) .

Well deserved!

#268 Evelyn

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 03:02 PM

Four stars from Michael Bauer.

#269 Evelyn

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Posted 07 May 2012 - 05:39 PM

An absolutely stellar meal last week with friends, so no notes. Also enjoying dinner at the restaurant that night, the chef and staff of Tokyo Michelin 3* Kagurazaka Ishikawa.

Our evening began with a cocktail in the 'new' salon. A nice place to relax before moving to the dining room. I tried the Cherry Daquiri made with Venezaulan rum infused for a year with local cherries. Blood red, very well balanced cocktail.

A few highlights from our included some Manresa classics--petit fours "red pepper-black olive"; Garden Beignets; Arpege farm egg; Into the Vegetable Garden. This dish is forever evolving thanks to the restaurant's relationship with Love Apple Farm. Each leaf, flower or vegetable pristine and flavorful. And, one of my all time favorites--A Spring tidal pool. Various components icluding sea urchin, scallop, clam seaweeds, mushrooms and foie gras bathed in a deeply flavored dashi. Raw milk panna cotta with abalone. The silky panna cotta topped with tender slices of Monterey Bay abalone in it own gelee.

The care in sourcing only the best ingredients is very apparent throughout the menu. But, especially so in the seafood and shellfish. Also, apparent--the respect for each ingredient's unique characteristics and the care in making sure they are prepared properly. Scallops, spot prawns, geoduck, clams and sea urchin so sweet and fresh. Some raw, some barely cooked by a broth. Turbot, cooked 'just enough' with braised artichokes, vegetable and bone marrow broth. Broths and gelees made with seawater, shellfish liquors and seaweeds--all deepening the flavors of the main ingredients.

Meat courses brought an incredibly tender suckling kid goat with curds and whey. Spring lamb roasted in dandelion butter, ocean persillade. Duck roasted in hay to a perfect medium rare with a crispy skin and served with porcini, spring onions and ramps.

We also indulged in a selection of cheese--both local and from afar. Each properly aged and served with toasted house breads.

Desserts also make use of the Garden--Strawberries, champagne and hibiscus. Gorgeous to look at with the bright green and red colors. I never thought of peas for a dessert. But, this dish made me a believer. Also a Jivara chocolate with praline, meyer lemon with feuilletine ice cream. And, finally a scoop of old fashioned, wickedly vanilla ice cream. Nasturium macarons and Petit Fours "strawberry-chocolate".

I am a bit short on time or I would go into each course--as this is just a snippet of our evening. Perhaps my dining companions will add their thoughts.

I am constantly amazed that each and every time I go to Manresa, I think there is no way that the meal I've had could be topped. And, each and every time I go back, the bar is raised again, and then surpassed again. I urge you, if you have not been to Manresa, or have not been recently--go now. If I only had one meal left in my life, I would head to Manresa.

#270 Orik

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Posted 07 May 2012 - 05:56 PM

Still digesting.

eta: to clarify, still digesting the concept.

sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns