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Indoor plant identification


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#1 tsquare

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Posted 30 June 2010 - 01:31 AM

Anyone?


This trailing plant puts out these globes of flowers off and on all year - they grow facing downward, so always a nice surprise to find one. My hand for scale.



#2 g.johnson

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Posted 30 June 2010 - 02:06 AM

Triffid.
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#3 Suzanne F

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Posted 30 June 2010 - 02:18 AM

QUOTE(g.johnson @ Jun 29 2010, 10:06 PM)  
Triffid.

laugh.gif
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#4 tsquare

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Posted 30 June 2010 - 02:23 AM

M would love that, but, no.

#5 cristina

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 03:11 AM

QUOTE(tsquare @ Jun 29 2010, 08:31 PM)  
Anyone?


This trailing plant puts out these globes of flowers off and on all year - they grow facing downward, so always a nice surprise to find one. My hand for scale.

Hoya. It's a lovely plant, just lovely, with dark green leathery leaves and those fabulous composite flowers. Here in Mexico, it's sometimes called terciopelo--velvet.

Does yours ever drip droplets of honey?

Do I win anything? A cutting would be nice...
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#6 Miguel Gierbolini

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 04:06 AM


"I mispoke."

#7 cristina

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 04:38 AM

QUOTE(Miguel Gierbolini @ Jul 9 2010, 11:06 PM)  

Is this one yours? And is it sometimes called terciopelo where you are? Here we are famous for making up whatever name strikes our fancy! For example, bugambilia is known as bugambilia most everywhere in Mexico, but in Morelia, it's called camelinas.
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#8 tsquare

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 06:10 AM

Cristina - Thank you for a name - does not seem to be an identifier though. No honey that I am aware of - perhaps the kitties take care of it? We would love to bring you a cutting (do you suppose customs would frown upon that?)

Miguel - beautiful photo - do you have a name for the plant?

#9 Miguel Gierbolini

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 09:58 AM

No no this is not mine but it is a plant available here. I don't know what we call it. In Puerto Rico, the Bougainvillea is known as Trinitarias.
"I mispoke."

#10 splinky

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 11:59 AM

looks like it might be called wax plant here



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#11 cstuart

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 04:49 PM

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoya

#12 cristina

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 05:30 PM

QUOTE(tsquare @ Jul 10 2010, 01:10 AM)  
Cristina - Thank you for a name - does not seem to be an identifier though. No honey that I am aware of - perhaps the kitties take care of it? We would love to bring you a cutting (do you suppose customs would frown upon that?)

Miguel - beautiful photo - do you have a name for the plant?

tsquare, it truly is what I mentioned: hoya. I had one for years that I grew from a cutting given to me by friends and would love to find another. Others have posted links to identifying websites. Why would you think it is not hoya?

If you come this way, customs would not care if you brought a cutting. As long as the plant is bare-root or a cutting, it can travel either way across the border. Plants in pots are a different story: a big no-no.
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The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing at the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

#13 tsquare

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 05:35 PM

Thank you! I completely missed that "Hoya" was not a greeting in a foreign language.

#14 prasantrin

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 05:39 PM

QUOTE(tsquare @ Jul 10 2010, 12:35 PM)  
Thank you! I completely missed that "Hoya" was not a greeting in a foreign language.

laugh.gif

Sounds like something I would think, too!

#15 cristina

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 07:41 PM

QUOTE(tsquare @ Jul 10 2010, 12:35 PM)  
Thank you! I completely missed that "Hoya" was not a greeting in a foreign language.


So when are you bringing the cutting? tongue.gif
Mexico Cooks!

The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing at the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.