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Where in the world is Ryan


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#16 Sneakeater

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 07:47 PM

Ryan Skeen tells his side of the story.
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#17 oakapple

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 08:12 PM

I made a similar comment on GrubStreet to the one I'll make here.

In each case, his explanation makes sense and is believable, if viewed in isolation.

But when it happens 10 times in a row, you have to think Ryan is at least part of the problem, if not the entire problem.
Marc Shepherd
Editor, New York Journal

#18 splinky

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 08:21 PM

maybe, he's just misunderstood

“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*

 


#19 Sneakeater

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 08:32 PM

Next, Chowdorow.
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#20 Orik

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 08:36 PM

Next, Chowdorow.


I spoke with Chodorow recently and he was a lot less terrible than I'd expected. (good news, bad news - he still has a couple of projects he's committed to in nyc, but then he doesn't plan to open any new places here)
I never said that

#21 oakapple

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 08:55 PM

It would be genuinely interesting to know how Chodorow managed to open so many stinkers. At some point, you figure he would either: A) Get better at it; or B) Give up.

And the thing is, so many Chodorow projects just look doomed from the moment you walk in the door. If I can see it, why can't he?
Marc Shepherd
Editor, New York Journal

#22 Orik

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 09:04 PM

Ryan Skeen tells his side of the story.


I used to work with someone who I really liked, but who was not the easiest personality in the world to interact with. This was his third job, and he told me about how in his two previous jobs he was given tasks that were beneath him, management was unwilling to listen to his ideas, and so on. I recently met him again and he told me the same about his current job, so I can only assume he was telling them the same about working with me Posted Image
I never said that

#23 Wilfrid

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 09:06 PM

Well said, Oakie. The explanations - A&D in particular - are wholly credible. But one has to set them alongside things one has heard about what it's like to work with the guy. But he did say (twice, apparently) that he's an asshole.

#24 oakapple

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 09:10 PM

If Ryan is NOT the problem, then he must be a terrible judge of character, in that he continually makes such poor choices about whom to work with.
Marc Shepherd
Editor, New York Journal

#25 Rail Paul

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 09:12 PM

There are some people, and we've all worked with them, who seem to dance across the tree tops, leaving a flood of screw ups, failed strategies, etc drifting down like rain or a broken sewage pipe. And, in spite of the bloody trail, they are signed on by somebody else who buys into the story, because this time it's really different.

Alas, it never is different.

“Jazz musicians just get better and better as the years go by. I think chefs are the same way. You know who you are.”

 

...Jonathan Waxman


#26 splinky

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 09:36 PM

sometimes jerky people are genuinely good at what they do and people take the risk because whatever they can get for a short amount of time before things implode is worth the hassle. not saying this is what's happening in this case but a lot of assholes can always find a next job even when they are well known assholes. some even run for high office

“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*

 


#27 joethefoodie

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 10:26 PM

It would be genuinely interesting to know how Chodorow managed to open so many stinkers.

Ego?

And the thing is, so many Chodorow projects just look doomed from the moment you walk in the door. If I can see it, why can't he?

Ego?

#28 Wilfrid

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 02:24 PM

You don't have to wait to walk in the door. I think it was before the opening of Center Cut he was quoted as saying "I just want to make really great creamed spinach," and I put my head in my hands saying, "Oh Jeffrey, Jeffrey..."

#29 Suzanne F

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 07:34 PM

If Ryan is NOT the problem, then he must be a terrible judge of character, in that he continually makes such poor choices about whom to work with.


In that industry, it is really, really easy to take a job without knowing what the bosses will be like, whether owners or exec--especially if it's a new place with no previous track record. I'd guess that there are very few written contracts that spell out all terms of employment, except for the very top echelon of chefs. Not saying this to let Skeen off the hook, but it's very difficult, if not impossible, to find out whether the owners will pay their bills (and their staff). And even when you start to see the signs (Oh, you won't leave today's delivery unless I pay in cash?), it's easy to overlook them. I've been there, got stiffed, and learned the lesson.

It is somewhat easier to tell if you will be comfortable working with/for a chef, because you can look back at that chef's previous work and make your own estimation of his/her style of food. And of course, assuming you do a trail or a tryout, you'll know immediately whether you can work with him/her. The signs are clear. Again, that may not happen with a new place (or with clueless owners). But if new owners do not ask for a tasting (at Skeen's level), which would be a clear indication of what they want, then alarm bells should go off.

So I'm inclined to think it's a combination of blindness in all parties. Then again, how many times has Skeen felt he was the wronged party and had to walk? Wise up, Ryan, before you sign on.<_<

I try never to dine with other people. It just makes things so much easier. -- Anthony Bonner, March 28, 2014

 

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deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#30 Rich

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 07:56 PM

Heard he was just hired at Frej so it could be considered a real restaurant.