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Brooklyn Fare


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#211 Orik

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 10:40 PM

In my restaurant, the reservation system will work as follows:

Each person has three tickets that they can place on dates and times available up to a year in advance and which they may move at will. We may increase or reduce the number of tickets based on visit frequency and no-shows.

Two weeks before the time of a reservation, they're pinged and given the expected cost and duration of the meal we plan to serve (we'll have approximate values published well in advance), and have to either cancel or make the ticket firm - meaning they're paying for it unless either they or us can find someone to take their seat. No shows suffer a small penalty as we have little hope of filling the seat and the food is wasted.

Reservations not allocated to any tickets go to a waiting list.

Finally, last minute cancellations and no shows are made available to interested parties who have cell phones in the near vicinity. (i.e. if we learn about a cancellation an hour in advance then we only broadcast it to people who can reasonably make it in an hour.)

This is all going to be patent protected, of course.

Not sure this was mentioned, but by calling their reservations tickets, Next really must deal with scalpers:

http://chicago.grubs..._ticket_br.html
I never said that

#212 Anthony Bonner

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 10:43 PM

In my restaurant, the reservation system will work as follows:

Each person has three tickets that they can place on dates and times available up to a year in advance and which they may move at will. We may increase or reduce the number of tickets based on visit frequency and no-shows.

Two weeks before the time of a reservation, they're pinged and given the expected cost and duration of the meal we plan to serve (we'll have approximate values published well in advance), and have to either cancel or make the ticket firm - meaning they're paying for it unless either they or us can find someone to take their seat. No shows suffer a small penalty as we have little hope of filling the seat and the food is wasted.

Reservations not allocated to any tickets go to a waiting list.

Finally, last minute cancellations and no shows are made available to interested parties who have cell phones in the near vicinity. (i.e. if we learn about a cancellation an hour in advance then we only broadcast it to people who can reasonably make it in an hour.)

This is all going to be patent protected, of course.

Not sure this was mentioned, but by calling their reservations tickets, Next really must deal with scalpers:

http://chicago.grubs..._ticket_br.html

wouldn't be a real restaurant.
Why not mayo?

#213 Orik

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 10:45 PM

wouldn't be a real restaurant.


We'll be open 17 days a week (Entry will be through the Prospect Heights TARDIS)
I never said that

#214 TaliesinNYC

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 10:49 PM

Just one observation from an ex-regular-restaurant-goer.

It seems to me a lot of work for very little output, all other things being equal. When I make a dinner reservation, work isn't what I usually have in mind. (Getting into Ko doesn't approach this level of ridiculousness.)

I'll pass for now.


#215 nuxvomica

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 04:00 AM

honestly, people, it's not that hard. and if you haven't been, it probably worth going at least once (although at this pricepoint...let's say i'm glad we went before, our dinners varied from $95 to $165 in a space of a year and a half). call - yes, it takes longer now (45 min the two of us dialing last year) but once you get through usually there are spots open the week they are booking - they do max out at 4 tops.

a note about numbers as there seems to be confusion - BKF now has 18 seats so chances are better to score seats.

Roberta's tasting has been for 4 max iirc (unless you are Orik and/or special). nice to see they'll do it for 2. anyone know how far in advance they are booking for the tasting now? (we went last summer right around the time of the Sifton piece and next thing you know they were booked till the end of the year)
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#216 Orik

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 04:12 AM

I think Roberta's is booking November 2017 now (just kidding, but it must be getting close)
I never said that

#217 oakapple

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 12:01 PM

Just one observation from an ex-regular-restaurant-goer.

It seems to me a lot of work for very little output, all other things being equal. When I make a dinner reservation, work isn't what I usually have in mind.

People regularly do that kind of "work" for other, non-culinary events, like a seat at Saturday Night Live, or a ticket to the Super Bowl.

I do think some food is good enough to justify a bit of effort in order to experience it. Is BF in that category? Well...I haven't gone yet.

(Getting into Ko doesn't approach this level of ridiculousness.)

When Ko opened, I recall multiple articles and blog posts describing all the "tricks" of getting through the unfamiliar online reservation system. People wrote of their success with breathless exhiliration, as if they'd lost their virginity. BF is relatively straightforward by comparison: just keep hitting redial.
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#218 GordonCooks

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 12:47 PM


I've always considered it a Pop-Up on Steroids, a curiosity.

If words mean anything, a pop-up is a restaurant installation designed to be temporary. Brooklyn Fare isn't any kind of pop-up; it's meant to be as permanent as any restaurant can be.

It just happens to have a rather limited number of seats. Is Momofuku Ko a pop-up? Is Atera a pop-up?

Akin to Checking out Keller's pop up in Harrod's if I was a well heeled Londoner.

Now, THAT'S a pop-up: a restaurant in a non-restaurant space, with a built-in expiration date.


My pop up definition is something high caliber in an unexpected place. You'll only find these little culinary oasis's in big cities with $$$ real estate. It's the only way a lot of chefs can put their vision on a plate. Whether it's O-Toro in a grocery store, Ludo in Kentucky, or Bahn Mi's in the back of a record store...all ironic and totally food rather than hospitality driven.
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#219 oakapple

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 01:06 PM

My pop up definition is something high caliber in an unexpected place.


“When I use a word,” Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, “it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less.”
“The question is,” said Alice, “whether you can make words mean so many different things.”


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#220 Sneakeater

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 01:45 PM

(45 min the two of us dialing last year)


This is something that is quite simply never going to happen. I am mystified that people do it. To eat dinner. In a restaurant.
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#221 Sneakeater

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 01:46 PM

People regularly do that kind of "work" for other, non-culinary events, like a seat at Saturday Night Live, or a ticket to the Super Bowl.


And, trying but failing not to be judgmental, to my mind those people are idiots.
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#222 Sneakeater

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 01:47 PM

I have to agree with Oakapple that Gordon is describing something identifiable that deserves a name -- but whatever it is, it's not a pop-up.
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#223 oakapple

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 02:35 PM

(45 min the two of us dialing last year)

This is something that is quite simply never going to happen. I am mystified that people do it. To eat dinner. In a restaurant.

Hypothetically, if you were going to be in Spain, and 45 of "work" could've gotten you into El Bulli(*), would you have considered it?

(*) I realize that El Bulli was not reservable by phone. I'm just asking whether Sneakeater will allow that any restaurant could be sufficiently interesting to be worth 30 or 60 minutes' effort to secure a reservation.
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#224 GordonCooks

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 03:05 PM

I have to agree with Oakapple that Gordon is describing something identifiable that deserves a name -- but whatever it is, it's not a pop-up.


I'm using the term very, very loosely, and am not married to it at all. It's just easier to allude to than to say all the things it's not (I'm mainly talking about when it first hit everyone's radar)

Micro Restaurant?
Matrix Restaurant?

I'm open
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Photography is jazz for the eye. - William Claxton

#225 Sneakeater

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 03:08 PM

Hypothetically, if you were going to be in Spain, and 45 of "work" could've gotten you into El Bulli(*), would you have considered it?

(*) I realize that El Bulli was not reservable by phone. I'm just asking whether Sneakeater will allow that any restaurant could be sufficiently interesting to be worth 30 or 60 minutes' effort to secure a reservation.


If I knew FOR CERTAIN that 45 minutes of work would get me in, probably. If there were any doubt whatsoever, no. (And I certainly didn't write, and wouldn't ever have written, the application essay El Bulli apparently required at least in later years.)

I did get up at 3 in the morning or whatever once to try for a Noma reservation -- but, like Ko, that only took a couple of minutes on my computer, and then back to sleep (without a reservation).
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