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baked cauliflower


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#1 splinky

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Posted 22 December 2010 - 12:37 AM

on tomorrow's menu is a baked casserole of cauliflower in a bechamel and gruyere/grana padano sort of sauce and topped with more gruyere. can i make it tonight and hold it over night? i do this all the time with mac & cheese, but am worried about my cauliflower getting mushy. is my concern misplaced?

“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*

 


#2 backstory

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 11:31 AM

on tomorrow's menu is a baked casserole of cauliflower in a bechamel and gruyere/grana padano sort of sauce and topped with more gruyere. can i make it tonight and hold it over night? i do this all the time with mac & cheese, but am worried about my cauliflower getting mushy. is my concern misplaced?


i know this is a bit late but i would roast the cauliflower separately. mix the sauce and veg the next day and bake together.
how did yours turn out?
In the end, it's all a rental. - hollywood

#3 splinky

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 01:06 PM

in the end i just put the casserole together about 2 hours before baking. i used colored cauliflower and didn't want the colors to bleed too much. it was awesome, as cheese casseroles go

“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*

 


#4 Ron Johnson

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 01:08 PM

was this a layered dish or was it vegetables in a casserole with the bechamel/cheese poured over and then baked?

#5 splinky

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 01:24 PM

was this a layered dish or was it vegetables in a casserole with the bechamel/cheese poured over and then baked?

the latter

“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*

 


#6 Ron Johnson

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 02:23 PM


was this a layered dish or was it vegetables in a casserole with the bechamel/cheese poured over and then baked?

the latter

I want to try making it that way. I have seen recipes for layered cauliflower gratin that require thin sliced of cauliflower, but it sounds like a pain in the ass.

did you have any problem with cauliflower releasing a lot of water while baking and diluting the bechamel?

#7 splinky

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 02:37 PM



was this a layered dish or was it vegetables in a casserole with the bechamel/cheese poured over and then baked?

the latter

I want to try making it that way. I have seen recipes for layered cauliflower gratin that require thin sliced of cauliflower, but it sounds like a pain in the ass.

did you have any problem with cauliflower releasing a lot of water while baking and diluting the bechamel?

slicing cauliflower thin is a pain in the ass, even with a mandoline. i steamed the cauliflower in the microwave and then set it on paper towel for a few minutes before putting it into the baking dish. it didn't release enough water in the baking to ruin the bechamel.

“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*

 


#8 Anthony Bonner

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 02:53 PM




was this a layered dish or was it vegetables in a casserole with the bechamel/cheese poured over and then baked?

the latter

I want to try making it that way. I have seen recipes for layered cauliflower gratin that require thin sliced of cauliflower, but it sounds like a pain in the ass.

did you have any problem with cauliflower releasing a lot of water while baking and diluting the bechamel?

slicing cauliflower thin is a pain in the ass, even with a mandoline. i steamed the cauliflower in the microwave and then set it on paper towel for a few minutes before putting it into the baking dish. it didn't release enough water in the baking to ruin the bechamel.

my grandma used to make a very thick bechamel and sort of just daub it on the pre-cooked veg and then brown that - so it wasn't really a casserole per se, but it was awesome.
Why not mayo?

#9 yvonne johnson

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 10:34 PM



was this a layered dish or was it vegetables in a casserole with the bechamel/cheese poured over and then baked?

the latter

I want to try making it that way. I have seen recipes for layered cauliflower gratin that require thin sliced of cauliflower, but it sounds like a pain in the ass.

did you have any problem with cauliflower releasing a lot of water while baking and diluting the bechamel?

I steam my cauliflower then pour over the cheese sauce. I could serve it like that, but I like to brown under the grill/in hot oven.

Also, I don't follow any fancy white sauce recipes before adding milk and the cheese to the sauce. As per Jocasta Innes, brown your butter and flour in a pan for a couple of minutes then put in all of the milk as per your recipe's proportions and then bring to very quick boil while whisking. Then simmer for a bit. Forget about adding the milk little by bit (In fact I think that might lead to lumpy). I've never had a lumpy sauce. (And I've not found that steamed veg release much liquid at all.)
It was not a new dish, as I recognised my tooth marks. Wilfrid

#10 splinky

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 10:39 PM




was this a layered dish or was it vegetables in a casserole with the bechamel/cheese poured over and then baked?

the latter

I want to try making it that way. I have seen recipes for layered cauliflower gratin that require thin sliced of cauliflower, but it sounds like a pain in the ass.

did you have any problem with cauliflower releasing a lot of water while baking and diluting the bechamel?

I steam my cauliflower then pour over the cheese sauce. I could serve it like that, but I like to brown under the grill/in hot oven.

Also, I don't follow any fancy white sauce recipes before adding milk and the cheese to the sauce. As per Jocasta Innes, brown your butter and flour in a pan for a couple of minutes then put in all of the milk as per your recipe's proportions and then bring to very quick boil while whisking. Then simmer for a bit. Forget about adding the milk little by bit (In fact I think that might lead to lumpy). I've never had a lumpy sauce.

my method is close to yvonne's. i brown some onions or shallots in butter add in the cream and then corn starch and then the cheese. my casserole was sort of a faked mac & cheese, so there was loads of cheese in the white sauce and on top. i topped with rice crumbs and grated piave in the last 10 minutes of the bake

“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*