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Jung Sik Dang


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#16 changeup

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Posted 20 September 2011 - 08:43 PM


I guess you're just not into neurogastronomy. ;)


To tell you the truth, that's the one I'm second most excited about.

(Better rush over before it closes.)


Where does the (now open) 5000 seat ceviche restaurant at the old Tabla site sit on the list?

#17 Suzanne F

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Posted 26 September 2011 - 01:42 PM

Interior and food shots, with a sort of review, from Tribeca Citizen

More Corton than Kori.

the people who flock to dine at the restaurant on account of its reputation/stars are getting their money's worth because what they are after is a piece of the reputation/stars and nothing else. their money is not wasted. -- mongo jones, 11/5/2014

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#18 Sneakeater

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Posted 26 September 2011 - 02:41 PM



I guess you're just not into neurogastronomy. ;)


To tell you the truth, that's the one I'm second most excited about.

(Better rush over before it closes.)


Where does the (now open) 5000 seat ceviche restaurant at the old Tabla site sit on the list?


Fourth (after Alain Allegretti).
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#19 Daniel

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Posted 26 September 2011 - 03:13 PM


<snip>
The pictures from the Seoul location don't look promising, seems like he was really influenced by Zuberoa and Akelare, but we'll see:

http://logonfood.com...-sik%C2%A0dang/

This is why I don't read blogs much: the writer doesn't know enough about the food, and can't spell.

However, I think the visuals are, in fact, promising. That sort of thing should go over well -- at least as well as Tamarind Tribeca -- so long as it is promoted more as high-end than Korean. Korean is not necessarily equated with cheap in Tribeca; for example, even if it has turned into more of a lounge, Kori has been around for many years now. And I can't recall the name, but I think there's another relatively expensive Korean place somewhere down here. It's not all Seh Ja Meh and Koreatown, you know.


Woo Lae Oak was a fancy Korean Spot down in Soho.. They closed but, for a while that place was super hot..
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#20 Sneakeater

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Posted 17 October 2011 - 04:42 PM

I had very high hopes for Jung Sik. I am happy -- and even a bit surprised -- to say I was not disappointed.

This is a relocation of an upscale Korean restaurant from Seoul. It's located in the former Tribeca Chanterelle space, which has been redone nicely (and they still have tablecloths!). There's a bar by the entrance (where they serve the full menu!). And then a wood-lined dining room, and a smaller dining room beyond it.

Despite his previous experience and supposed success in Korea, the Chef looks all of twelve years old.

This place is not cheap. There's a five-course fixed-price menu, giving you an extensive selection of choices in each of the Salad, Rice/Noodle, Seafood, Meat, and Dessert categories, for $125 (with another $75 for pairings). For the same price, they also offer what seems to me to be a fairly useless five-course tasting menu, where they simply make the selections for each course for you. I guess it's for diners intimidated by the menu or something.

I'll tell you what other restaurant the food here called to mind: Le Bernardin. Now please don't think I'm saying Jung Sik is as good as Le Bernardin (or, indeed, even in the same universe of goodness as Le Bernardin). But the keynote of Chef Yim's (I hope I'm correctly identifying his surname) style is the same as Eric Ripert's: a lot of flavors in each dish that you don't necessarily expect to taste together, subtly (even reticently) presented, but perfectly balanced. This is something of a surprise -- and may impede popular acceptance of this restaurant -- because subtle (even reticent) flavors is not what most of us New York non-Koreans have learned to expect from Korean food. But that's what you get here. And given the current NYC trend of in-your-face eating, I have to say it's a very pleasant change.

It's been a while since my dinner there, so my ability to present detailed descriptions is impaired, but let me signal a few dishes I particularly liked (my Dining Companion and I shared everything). Mr. Kim Halibut, in a clear fish broth, let you taste the fish -- but only through a delicate web of flavorings. OMG Salmon was lightly smoked. What restaurant recently made such a big impression by putting frozen grapes in a dish? I don't remember. Anyway, here the grapes were only chilled, but provided a very welcome flavor accent. Restaurants now appear to be getting much better table grapes than I have seen before.

If Jung Sik yet has a signature dish, it's probably the Five Senses Pork. This is a silky sliced pork belly with a variety of seasonings supposed to give different sense impressions. I wouldn't say it lives up to its multi-sense pretense. I would say it's a good dish -- fine enough to make you forget you're over pork belly. And the Galbi is just Galbi -- the short-rib meat fatty but not too (same goes for the pork belly), served with delicious crisp rice-cake balls.

Wine pairings are notable because, although there's nothing you don't know, there's also nothing you wouldn't happily choose for yourself. So although there are no revelations, there are also no longueurs. The pairings seemed well thought-out in terms of flavor matching. Notably, this is definitely wine food -- not beer food as more familiar Korean is.

The hostess and the sommelier are incredibly nice and helpful. The waiters seem like guys who are pretending to be waiters in a three (NYT)-star-type restaurant. That, I hope, will be improved.

I enjoyed Jung Sik a lot. But I am even more excited about the potential here. If given a chance, I get the feeling that Chef Yim will only get better. In any event -- especially given the strong chance that this expensive, not obviously crowd-pleasing restaurant will fail -- those seeking something a bit different should not hesitate. Just put aside any expectations about what Korean food will taste like.
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#21 Sneakeater

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Posted 17 October 2011 - 05:03 PM

What restaurant recently made such a big impression by putting frozen grapes in a dish?


Hospoda!
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#22 Orik

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Posted 17 October 2011 - 05:03 PM

Thanks, sounds like it's worth a try soon. Did they provide any more info about their ingredients? At that price level I'm sort of expecting more than "beef", "pork", "salmon"

sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns


#23 oakapple

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Posted 17 October 2011 - 05:04 PM

They're lucky Sifton stepped down when he did, because it's clear he was getting ready to hammer it. His successor may yet do so.
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#24 Sneakeater

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Posted 17 October 2011 - 05:04 PM

Did they provide any more info about their ingredients? At that price level I'm sort of expecting more than "beef", "pork", "salmon"


They did not, on the menu.

I'm sure they would if you asked.
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#25 changeup

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Posted 17 October 2011 - 05:07 PM

I've heard the biggest early issues are mainly service related, but there is a significant focus being placed there by the establishment. I'm glad to hear the food is that good, I was advised to wait a bit longer due to service and have taken that advice.

I also know that Ssam Bar did frozen grapes a couple years back, with the dish of mussels.

#26 Sneakeater

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Posted 17 October 2011 - 05:21 PM

Oh, the bread is very interesting and very good.
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#27 oakapple

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 02:53 PM

The dumbest Adam Platt review ever? He says the food is worth three stars, but awards only one star overall for "non-food" reasons (the room, the price).
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#28 Sneakeater

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 03:08 PM

Almost as bad as the Times' treatment of SHO.

Predictable. But I'm pissed.
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#29 changeup

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 03:12 PM

I'm not pissed, I'm hungry! Sounds great, no mention of service issues from someone that hates restaurants as much as him is a great sign.

#30 rozrapp

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 03:20 PM

The dumbest Adam Platt review ever? He says the food is worth three stars, but awards only one star overall for "non-food" reasons (the room, the price).


Platt's a total idiot!! We had dinner at Jung Sik last week and loved everything about it! I'll be posting a review on my blog in the near future. Meanwhile, photos here.