Jump to content


Photo

Report: Up to 70% of some fish may be mislabeled


  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#16 foodie52

foodie52

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,340 posts

Posted 28 October 2011 - 11:19 PM

I think tilapia is due for the new name.
[size="4"]Visit our website for updates...Friends of Colombian Orphans

Donations are always gratefully accepted.

#17 9lives

9lives

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,025 posts

Posted 28 October 2011 - 11:55 PM


What do they call dog now?

Think I found it--consulting Davidson--Rock Salmon.

Cracks me up.


Dogfish is IMO lousy eating and makes for a pain in the @@@ for fishing cuz they'll take any bait before other fish can get to the bait/hook; so when they're around, it's impossible to catch other more desirable fish.

I was told by a commercial fisherman that there's no market in the US and it's all shipped to the UK for fish n chips. Not sure I believe him and I'd guess plenty stays here for fish n chips.economics and Just my cynical opinion....and dogfish may sound bad but better than the small shark that it looks like.

#18 yvonne johnson

yvonne johnson

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8,076 posts

Posted 29 October 2011 - 02:51 AM



What do they call dog now?

Think I found it--consulting Davidson--Rock Salmon.

Cracks me up.


Dogfish is IMO lousy eating and makes for a pain in the @@@ for fishing cuz they'll take any bait before other fish can get to the bait/hook; so when they're around, it's impossible to catch other more desirable fish.

I was told by a commercial fisherman that there's no market in the US and it's all shipped to the UK for fish n chips. Not sure I believe him and I'd guess plenty stays here for fish n chips.economics and Just my cynical opinion....and dogfish may sound bad but better than the small shark that it looks like.

Dog is related to little shark, as far as I know, and I'm sure your fisher-friend was correct that is was/is popular in the UK.

Old story, monkfish was very unpopular in the UK from the1980-early 2000s; nobody bought it in Scotland during that time, but it sold extremely well in France and my great cousin made a fortune.
It was not a new dish, as I recognised my tooth marks. Wilfrid

#19 mongo_jones

mongo_jones

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 21,727 posts

Posted 29 October 2011 - 05:29 AM

Old story, monkfish was very unpopular in the UK from the1980-early 2000s;


wasn't popular in the u.s either when it was known as toadfish.

my annoying opinions: whisky, food and occasional cultural commentary (current review: the hmongtown marketplace food court, st. paul)

 

facts are meaningless. you could use facts to prove anything that's even remotely true!
~homer simpson


 


#20 foodie52

foodie52

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,340 posts

Posted 29 October 2011 - 02:20 PM

I think Julia Child helped make it popular. I know that one of her cookbooks has her hoisting a whole one for the camera.
[size="4"]Visit our website for updates...Friends of Colombian Orphans

Donations are always gratefully accepted.

#21 yvonne johnson

yvonne johnson

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8,076 posts

Posted 29 October 2011 - 06:16 PM

Reading all the links and related reports in the press, I think few journos are doing a good job.

First, mis-naming fish for the purpose of getting a better price: if the customer can't tell the difference b/w a sole and flounder fillet, I'm not getting very upset.

So, the 25% of fish that's mislabeled in that regard I could care less.

Second, the mislabeling of endangered fish to read un-endangered, then of course that is another matter entirely.

Third, something I never even considered was the C02 emissions from the merchant fleet (this usually excludes commercial fishing vessels) but it amounts to nearly 5% of all greenhouse emissions. Put that together with fishing boats.
Link

Amazing stats:

The shipping industry transports more than 90% of global and European external trade. There are more than 94,000 merchant ships globally, most of which are dry bulk carriers andoiltankers.....Some 466,000 officers and 721,000 sailors serve on merchant ships worldwide. The majority of sailors are recruited from developing countries, especially South East Asia (Philippines, Indonesia, China, India).
shipping.


According to the FAO, there are currently (2004) four million commercial fishing vessels.

wiki-fishing
It was not a new dish, as I recognised my tooth marks. Wilfrid

#22 Orik

Orik

    Advanced Member

  • Technocrat
  • PipPipPip
  • 17,366 posts

Posted 30 October 2011 - 04:39 PM

Time to consider nuclear powered fishing boats.

sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns


#23 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 41,657 posts

Posted 31 October 2011 - 03:01 PM

Triremes!
Bar Loser

MF Old