Jump to content


Photo

macaron


  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#1 splinky

splinky

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 20,444 posts

Posted 23 August 2011 - 10:11 PM

so, i'm going to take the plunge and whip some up, i am armed with almond flour, baker's sugar and fine chocolate. who's done this before? what are the pitfalls? any tips and tricks? is the lebovitz recipe the best way to go?

“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*

 


#2 Daisy

Daisy

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 15,235 posts

Posted 24 August 2011 - 12:49 AM

I am a fan of Lebovitz but I am going to put it out there that Pim has extensive stuff on her blog about making macarons and since everything Pim has baked that I have tasted has been exquisite...

I think a dry day is an important factor, very important.
Sardines aren't for sissies.---Frank Bruni
------------------------------------------------------------
The mistake one makes is to react to what people post rather than to what they mean.---Dr. Johnson
-------------------------------------------------------------
I want to be the girl with the most cake.

#3 splinky

splinky

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 20,444 posts

Posted 24 August 2011 - 12:54 AM

I am a fan of Lebovitz but I am going to put it out there that Pim has extensive stuff on her blog about making macarons and since everything Pim has baked that I have tasted has been exquisite...

I think a dry day is an important factor, very important.

thanks daisy, i'll check out pim's. yes, absolutely has to be a dry day project

“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*

 


#4 Lippy

Lippy

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10,063 posts

Posted 24 August 2011 - 01:42 AM

I just see announcements for her classes, not the recipe. I remember reading a very elaborate explanation of the technique on Facebook, but I can't find her recipe. Do you have a link? (I know she uses the Italian merinque method.)

#5 Suzanne F

Suzanne F

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 17,063 posts

Posted 24 August 2011 - 02:03 AM

Remember that in order for the foot to form, you have to leave them to dry before you bake them.

the people who flock to dine at the restaurant on account of its reputation/stars are getting their money's worth because what they are after is a piece of the reputation/stars and nothing else. their money is not wasted. -- mongo jones, 11/5/2014

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#6 splinky

splinky

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 20,444 posts

Posted 25 August 2011 - 02:09 PM

doesn't look like pim's recipe is available without taking her class. anyway, the impending hurricane means, i'll have to wait a while before tackling this

“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*

 


#7 Lippy

Lippy

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10,063 posts

Posted 25 August 2011 - 02:16 PM

I'm sure David's recipe is just fine. Pim's website seems to have morphed into ads for classes and jams, unless there is just something wrong with my link.

#8 Behemoth

Behemoth

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,908 posts

Posted 25 August 2011 - 03:33 PM

I'm pretty sure SethG made the Pierre Hermes chocolate version and posted about it on eG a (long while) while back. Might be helpful to look there in terms of technique.
Summarizing, then, we assume that relational information is not subject to a corpus of utterance tokens upon which conformity has been defined by the paired utterance test.
-Chomskybot

#9 Rail Paul

Rail Paul

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 19,449 posts

Posted 02 November 2011 - 01:56 AM

NY Times offers a review of macaron bakers in New York City.

Ladurée and Vendôme touch the hem of heaven, and it is a long way down. Still, honorable mention should go to the buoyant and intense vanilla and lemon macarons at Almondine in Dumbo and Park Slope in Brooklyn, and the delicate cassis and vivid passion fruit versions at La Maison du Macaron in Chelsea. Both shops are run by expat Frenchmen who seem to be have capitulated a little to the American sweet tooth.

I must confess an irrational fondness for the macarons at Takahachi Bakery in TriBeCa. They are too big. They don’t really qualify as meringues. The fillings are oddly fluffy, like cake frosting. But the flavors (yuzu-passion fruit, green tea, black sesame) are pure and true, and barely sweet at all.

The macarons at La Maison du Chocolat on the Upper East Side are even smaller in diameter than Ladurée’s, and have less loft and more tooth. They are strict here: there is no filling but chocolate ganache, infused with flavors like pistachio, coffee, and (the angels sing) salted caramel.

Bisous Ciao, on the Lower East Side, a minimalist white-cube boutique, presents macarons as a study in longing, arrayed in a long glittering case. You want to press your nose to the glass. They do not quite live up to their promise: some shatter at the touch, others are too sturdy. Still, they will do the trick, tucked in their chic gift box, black and pink, à la Agent Provocateur.

At Little Oven in Long Island City, Queens, Anna-Marie Farrier, who has a Ph.D. in literature from Princeton, makes macarons that are technically accomplished, albeit slightly dense. But is that so wrong? Perhaps we should shift our horizon of expectation and herald the arrival of an American macaron, one that eschews ethereality for the heft of a brownie.


Macaron

“Jazz musicians just get better and better as the years go by. I think chefs are the same way. You know who you are.”

 

...Jonathan Waxman


#10 SethG

SethG

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,300 posts

Posted 02 November 2011 - 02:01 AM

I'm pretty sure SethG made the Pierre Hermes chocolate version and posted about it on eG a (long while) while back. Might be helpful to look there in terms of technique.


I was away when this was first posted...

I've never made macarons. I'd like to try, though! I do enjoy eating them.

I do recall there was a long thread on eG, started by nightscotsman perhaps? I know he started the thread on caneles, and I did participate in that one.

How did yours come out, splinky?
Why yes, I do have a rock climbing blog! Climb and Punishment

#11 splinky

splinky

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 20,444 posts

Posted 02 November 2011 - 02:07 AM


I'm pretty sure SethG made the Pierre Hermes chocolate version and posted about it on eG a (long while) while back. Might be helpful to look there in terms of technique.


I was away when this was first posted...

I've never made macarons. I'd like to try, though! I do enjoy eating them.

I do recall there was a long thread on eG, started by nightscotsman perhaps? I know he started the thread on caneles, and I did participate in that one.

How did yours come out, splinky?

didn't make 'em yet. everyday when i had the time it was too humid.

“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*

 


#12 Stone

Stone

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 14,990 posts

Posted 02 November 2011 - 02:31 PM

I had some Macaron Parlour macarons at the Grub Street Hester Street Steet Fair. The pistachio and the salted caramel were very good. I passed on the maple & bacon. I've decided to boycott stupid bacon applications. I think you all should join me.

#13 prasantrin

prasantrin

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,429 posts

Posted 07 November 2011 - 12:19 AM

I just got notification from Amazon of a delivery date for Pierre Herme's Macaron (the English version)--sometime in the month of December!

Well, at least the books are still being published, so I can still get a copy. . .

#14 Rail Paul

Rail Paul

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 19,449 posts

Posted 25 July 2013 - 12:35 PM

NY Times has an article by the ever-interesting Elaine Sciolino about macarons

 

 

 

But try hard enough and you can find small-scale bakers making great macarons, like Arnaud Delmontel, a baker and pastry chef in my neighborhood. I was invited to his kitchen to learn to make them.

Two men in his kitchen turn out about 3,000 macarons a day in four flavors. I watched as one made a pistachio-flavored filling while the other squeezed out the meringue-based cookie shells onto baking sheets, ending them in comma-like swirls. Mr. Delmontel handed me the metal-tipped pastry bag, cupped his hand around mine and ordered me to squeeze. “I squeeze, I squeeze, I squeeze, I squeeze, I squeeze,” he said. I did what I was told; let’s just say my squeezes and swirls were done with panache.

The baking sheets were pounded on the counter 20 times or more to make the cookies uniform. They sat for 30 to 60 minutes before they were baked and then refrigerated before they were filled.

 

 

http://www.nytimes.c...ed=2&ref=dining

 

 

http://arnaud-delmon...om/index.en.php


“Jazz musicians just get better and better as the years go by. I think chefs are the same way. You know who you are.”

 

...Jonathan Waxman


#15 Lauren

Lauren

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,957 posts

Posted 25 July 2013 - 06:06 PM

 

I'm pretty sure SethG made the Pierre Hermes chocolate version and posted about it on eG a (long while) while back. Might be helpful to look there in terms of technique.


I was away when this was first posted...

I've never made macarons. I'd like to try, though! I do enjoy eating them.

I do recall there was a long thread on eG, started by nightscotsman perhaps? I know he started the thread on caneles, and I did participate in that one.

How did yours come out, splinky?

 

 

In case anyone wants to know, here's what nightscotsman is up to these days.

 

http://www.crumbleandflake.com/

 

By the way, I can't figure out how to post links like I used to - where you can make the words the live link. Am I missing something?


Transmogrified by smoke and salt

You deserve a triumphant mouthful of meat........Lily to Marshall as he searches for the best burger in NY on HIMYM