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South Africa in New York


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#1 Wilfrid

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Posted 02 November 2011 - 09:31 PM

I liked this event. Really nice food with wine pairings as a complimentary lunch with commentary from the South African chef. I actually got some pretty pictures too.

To the Pig!

#2 StephanieL

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 02:57 PM

Ah, bunny chow and fetkoek--a double starch extravaganza.

Definitely gussied-up versions of regular SA dishes--it would have been interesting to see N's reaction. And raisins are often found in bobotie.

So when are you going to South Africa? Or at least to Madiba? BTW, if you want some authentic recipes, N has one of the old standard SA cookbooks.
"Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires." --John Steinbeck


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#3 Wilfrid

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 03:44 PM

They gave out cookbooks in the gift bag. Some of these recipes look easy enough.

Yes, plenty of starch. Two different breads, both fried, on the bunny chow plate; bread and custard on the bobotie. But it all looked pretty!

#4 StephanieL

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 05:18 PM

And normally bunny chow is served in a hollowed-out loaf of bread (whole or half), so be glad he didn't serve it that way. It was developed by a curry stand operator by the Durban rail station as a way for workers to take their curry on the go (true story).
"Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires." --John Steinbeck


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#5 Wilfrid

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 05:32 PM

The story he told was using loaves to smuggle it out of restaurants where the staff could work in the kitchen but not eat in the dining room. Tales grow abundantly around these kinds of foodstuffs. Similar to the Cornish pasty.