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#1 splinky

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 12:38 PM

can i substitute fiori di sicilia for orange blossom water in claudia roden's orange cake?

“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*

 


#2 hollywood

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 03:16 PM

Hmmmm?

You know that wonderful marriage of flavors you taste when you combine vanilla ice cream and orange sherbet in the same bowl? That’s what Fiori di Sicilia tastes like. We find that using it in just about anything mild and sweet–anything where competing flavors, like chocolate, don’t interfere–adds a wonderfully mysterious taste. Your friends will be guessing just what you’ve done to your sugar cookies or yellow cake or sweet bread to make them taste SO good!


Why not?

I got that gin in my system
Somebody's gon' be my victim.

 

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#3 Suzanne F

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 04:32 AM

OTOH, orange blossom water is basically floral, and fairly light (water-based), whereas all the fiori di Sicilia versions I've come across are alcohol-based extracts. A recipe for a homemade version was vanilla, orange, and lemon extracts--quite a bit stronger than orange blossom water would be. So if you do substitute it for the orange blossom water, use considerably less.

BTW: When I looked for a recipe for the cake, very few of them even had the orange blossom water. Not in this version that appeared in the NY Times (supposedly straight from Claudia Roden), nor this one that says it was somewhere attributed to Claudia Roden, nor this one that leads you to think it appears in The New Book of Middle Eastern Food. (It doesn't; or at least I can't find it anywhere in the book.) This one does include it, but she says "It does not much matter if you leave out the orange blossom water, which I sometimes do."

I don't want to seem obsessed with this, but . . . -- Sneakeater, August 13, 2014

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#4 splinky

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 02:13 PM

OTOH, orange blossom water is basically floral, and fairly light (water-based), whereas all the fiori di Sicilia versions I've come across are alcohol-based extracts. A recipe for a homemade version was vanilla, orange, and lemon extracts--quite a bit stronger than orange blossom water would be. So if you do substitute it for the orange blossom water, use considerably less.

BTW: When I looked for a recipe for the cake, very few of them even had the orange blossom water. Not in this version that appeared in the NY Times (supposedly straight from Claudia Roden), nor this one that says it was somewhere attributed to Claudia Roden, nor this one that leads you to think it appears in The New Book of Middle Eastern Food. (It doesn't; or at least I can't find it anywhere in the book.) This one does include it, but she says "It does not much matter if you leave out the orange blossom water, which I sometimes do."

my fiori di sicilia is alcohol based but i sort of liked the idea of the flowery creamsicle flavor with the almond. maybe i'll stick with orange blossom water the first time unless just vanilla makes a nicer cake.
also wondering if i use a le creuset 9inch tarte tatin pan will i have to change the cooking time by much?

“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*

 


#5 Suzanne F

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 05:30 PM

Sort of a reverse situation: when I want a "fiori di Sicilia" kind of flavor in my almond ice milk, I add orange blossom water, vanilla extract, lemon zest, and a tiny pinch of cinnamon.

I don't want to seem obsessed with this, but . . . -- Sneakeater, August 13, 2014

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#6 splinky

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 05:33 PM

Sort of a reverse situation: when I want a "fiori di Sicilia" kind of flavor in my almond ice milk, I add orange blossom water, vanilla extract, lemon zest, and a tiny pinch of cinnamon.

did vanilla with a touch of the fiori di sicilia. cake's in the oven. i am tempted to top it with a dark chocolate ganache

“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*