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Junior Seau, 43


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#1 Evelyn

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 07:44 PM

Junior Seau, 43.

He's the eigth member of the 1994 San Deigo Chargers team that won the Super Bowl to die at a very young age.

#2 Stone

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 07:45 PM

Apparently died of a self-inflicted wound. A few years back he "accidentally" drove his car off a cliff after assaulting his then girlfriend. He was a great player. If this tragedy is linked to post-concussion syndrome, it could provide the impetus for some real action in the NFL to protect players.*

*Of course, at the same time, the NFL Players Association is putting its weight behind those players' union members suspended for intentionally trying to injure other players' union members as part of the Saints' bounty program. Now, there's a dilemma.

And she was.


#3 Adrian

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 10:19 PM

Junior Seau, 43.

He's the eigth member of the 1994 San Deigo Chargers team that won the Super Bowl to die at a very young age.


They got crushed by the 49ers, but they did win the AFC. Regardless, pretty awful.

I think you need to interpret what I'm saying in a reasonable way.


#4 tighe

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 10:37 PM

Really sad. One of my favorite players for a long time.

One of my friends speculated that he didn't shoot himself in the head because he wanted to preserve his brain for research. Not sure someone in that state of mind thinks through those issues, but who knows.

...it could provide the impetus for some real action in the NFL to protect players.


At what point though, does this lead to the game looking a lot more like the Pro Bowl than what we know as NFL football. Or at what point do we, as a society, decide that watching men do catastrophic damage to each other and themselves is not much more ethically supportable than the gladiatorial games.
It may have been Camelot for Jack and Jacqueline
But on the Che Guevara highway filling up with gasoline
Fidel Castro's brother spies a rich lady who's crying
Over luxury's dissapointment
So he walks over and he's trying
To sympathize with her, but thinks that he should warn her
That the Thirld World is just around the corner

#5 Steven Dilley

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 11:16 PM

Really sad. One of my favorite players for a long time.

One of my friends speculated that he didn't shoot himself in the head because he wanted to preserve his brain for research. Not sure someone in that state of mind thinks through those issues, but who knows.


It's what Dave Duerson did last year.
Say what you will about the ten commandments, you must always come back to the pleasant fact that there are only ten of them.

--H.L.Mencken


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Sissies and wastoids

#6 Steven Dilley

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 11:20 PM

He was in beast in that AFC Championship game. I can still see Barry Foster, on the goal line, about to catch the go-ahead TD with a minute left, when some DB flew in from who-knows-where and knocked it down. (Not Seau on that play.)
Say what you will about the ten commandments, you must always come back to the pleasant fact that there are only ten of them.

--H.L.Mencken


.............................
Sissies and wastoids

#7 Evelyn

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 01:11 AM

Really sad. One of my favorite players for a long time.

One of my friends speculated that he didn't shoot himself in the head because he wanted to preserve his brain for research. Not sure someone in that state of mind thinks through those issues, but who knows.

...it could provide the impetus for some real action in the NFL to protect players.


At what point though, does this lead to the game looking a lot more like the Pro Bowl than what we know as NFL football. Or at what point do we, as a society, decide that watching men do catastrophic damage to each other and themselves is not much more ethically supportable than the gladiatorial games.


Bama played in the NCAAs at the SDSU arena (the game was even delayed by a bomb threat :o ). We went to Seau's sports bar after. He was working the room. Seemed like a really nice guy. I hate to see all these young guys having these serious health issues. It makes me glad that the NCAA is coming down so hard on schools about concussion rules.

#8 Wilfrid

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 02:58 PM


Really sad. One of my favorite players for a long time.

One of my friends speculated that he didn't shoot himself in the head because he wanted to preserve his brain for research. Not sure someone in that state of mind thinks through those issues, but who knows.


It's what Dave Duerson did last year.


Wow, I had no idea this was going on.

#9 Stone

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 04:34 PM

I have a feeling the next 5 years will see some significant changes in how football is played. I don't think the issue can or should be ignored any more.

I wonder if the concussions have a similar affect on boxers and mixed-martial artists.

And she was.


#10 Wilfrid

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 04:37 PM

I am suprised lawsuits haven't forced a change already.

Is there an issue about voluntary assumption of risk? I think it's plausible that football players, until relatively recently, were unaware of the risk they were running -- I'm talking specifically about dementia, not chronic injury in general. Boxers can't have been.

#11 Stone

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 05:01 PM

I think the claim is that the NFL knew of the risk and concealed its magnitude from the players. Or perhaps that the NFL had a duty to investigate which, if followed, would have uncovered the risk years ago.

Muhammad Ali is the obvious case for the boxers, but you don't really hear about other boxers suffering similar deterioration. And while boxers may not have a legal claim due to assumption of the risk, it could require some modification to the "sport". Perhaps we'll see boxers wearing headgear in fights.

And she was.


#12 Sneakeater

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 05:05 PM

Isn't "punch drunk" a well-known phrase?
Bar Loser

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#13 splinky

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 05:10 PM

I think the claim is that the NFL knew of the risk and concealed its magnitude from the players. Or perhaps that the NFL had a duty to investigate which, if followed, would have uncovered the risk years ago.

Muhammad Ali is the obvious case for the boxers, but you don't really hear about other boxers suffering similar deterioration. And while boxers may not have a legal claim due to assumption of the risk, it could require some modification to the "sport". Perhaps we'll see boxers wearing headgear in fights.

Louis , Dempsey, quarry, Benitez

“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*

 


#14 Stone

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 05:12 PM

Well, there you go.

And she was.


#15 Wilfrid

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 05:16 PM

Right. But your analysis of the NFL case makes sense. Kind of reminds me of tobacco, where plaintiffs had to make out there were risks above and beyond the, like, obvious ones. Tricky for them, but could be easy for NFL players.