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Sean Brock's Pan fried soft-shell crabs


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#1 Rail Paul

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 10:12 PM

WSJ:

The Wall Street Journal has a quick food article on chef Sean Brock's version of soft shelled crabs. It's pretty straight forward.


Create a batter out of 3 cups of self rising flour, 2 bottles of dark beer, sesame seeds, and a little salt. Whisk well and put in the fridge.

Heat a few cups of canola oil to 325-350 in a deep pot.

Wilt Swiss chard in a skillet with butter

Warm bacon or guanciale in another skillet until golden, add a little bacon and parsley

Remove batter from fridge, dip crabs in batter, allow some to drip off

Place in hot oil, cover immediately. Turn in about 3-4 minutes, total cooking time 8 minutes

Melt butter in another skillet, fry eggs, basting in butter as you go

Plating:
--divide the chard
--put crab on chard
--put egg on crab
--Drizzle bacon and lemon etc over egg and crab

“Jazz musicians just get better and better as the years go by. I think chefs are the same way. You know who you are.”

 

...Jonathan Waxman


#2 Rail Paul

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 03:19 PM

Eater's Charleston edition observes that Sean Brock will have a new cookbook coming out this fall.

 

"Heritage" is the title...

 

http://eater.com/arc...st-cookbook.php


“Jazz musicians just get better and better as the years go by. I think chefs are the same way. You know who you are.”

 

...Jonathan Waxman


#3 AaronS

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 03:20 PM

I preordered it!



#4 Daniel

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 03:29 PM

i am surprised the recipe calls for sesame seeds, the few times I have eaten his food, he was all about the benne seeds.. Perhaps, he adapted the lingo for us Northerners.  


Ason, I keep planets in orbit.

#5 Anthony Bonner

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 03:33 PM

I think benne is pretty hard to come by.
Why not mayo?

#6 Anthony Bonner

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 03:33 PM

Also I don't like battered soft shells.
Why not mayo?

#7 Sneakeater

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 03:34 PM

I thought benne WAS sesame.
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#8 Daniel

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 03:36 PM

you are correct but, he calls it benne. I looked it up and the interwebs says they are the same thing.. But, our waitress said it was not.  So, I am confused.. but, the fact that it was benne was definitely a big deal. 


Ason, I keep planets in orbit.

#9 Anthony Bonner

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 03:39 PM

Benne is I think shorthand for a heritage variety.
Why not mayo?

#10 Sneakeater

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 03:46 PM

Not that its relevant or of any interest whatsoever, but I use Anson Mills's bennecake flour for various purposes (none of which has so far involved making bennecakes) all the time.
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#11 splinky

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 04:03 PM

Benne is I think shorthand for a heritage variety.

i've heard that, as well as, benne is the unhulled sesame seed. i think it's a lower oil heritage variety that may or may not be unhulled. i asked a nigerian friend who said that benne was the word for sesame in some dialects. guess we need to ask glenn roberts or sean brock what it is that they are calling benne


“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*

 


#12 cstuart

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 04:34 PM

Benne was the name brought over from Africa so you'll see it used in certain regions for all sesame seeds. Certain people -- and I'd bet Brock included -- use benne for a heirloom variety which more closely resembles the original seed brought over (as opposed to the current sesame seed most often seen which was bred for oil production).



#13 Anthony Bonner

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 04:34 PM

Yeah the Anson Mills website pretty much says just that.
Why not mayo?

#14 Daniel

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 04:36 PM

and that's what our waitress said. 


Ason, I keep planets in orbit.

#15 Orik

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Posted 30 April 2014 - 09:20 AM

Is that variety better than Ethiopian Humeral seeds?


I never said that