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Aesop's Splinter


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#1 Stone

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Posted 31 January 2005 - 11:38 PM

I have a vague recollection of an Aesop fable where a mouse pulls a thorn out of an elephant's foot. Or maybe an ant pulls a thorn out of a lion's foot. Or something like that.

Anyone?

And she was.


#2 Lippy

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Posted 01 February 2005 - 12:10 AM

This one:

The Lion And The Shepherd
A LION, roaming through a forest, trod upon a thorn. Soon afterward he came up to a Shepherd and fawned upon him, wagging his tail as if to say, "I am a suppliant, and seek your aid." The Shepherd boldly examined the beast, discovered the thorn, and placing his paw upon his lap, pulled it out; thus relieved of his pain, the Lion returned into the forest. Some time after, the Shepherd, being imprisoned on a false accusation, was condemned "to be cast to the Lions" as the punishment for his imputed crime. But when the Lion was released from his cage, he recognized the Shepherd as the man who healed him, and instead of attacking him, approached and placed his foot upon his lap. The King, as soon as he heard the tale, ordered the Lion to be set free again in the forest, and the Shepherd to be pardoned and restored to his friends.

#3 Lippy

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Posted 01 February 2005 - 12:12 AM

Or maybe this one:

Those who are ignorant of their craft will give themselves away, as the following fable shows.
A mighty lion saw a horse grazing in a field. In order to sneakily deceive the horse, the lion approached him in a friendly fashion and said he was a doctor. The horse suspected a trick, but he did not reject the lion's claims. When the lion drew closer, the horse quickly thought up an escape. He pretended that he had a splinter in his hoof, so he lifted up his foot and said, 'Help me, brother; I am so glad you are here! Save me from the splinter that I have stepped on.' The lion approached with feigned deference, concealing his true intentions, whereupon the horse suddenly kicked the lion in the face. Down fell the deadly foe! The lion lay there on the ground for quite a while and when he came to, he saw that the horse was gone and he realized that his head and face and whole body had been wounded. 'It serves me right for approaching the horse in a gentle and friendly way,' said the lion. 'I came to him in the guise of a doctor but I should have approached him like an enemy, as I always did before!'
Let the audience pay close attention: be yourself and don't pretend to be someone you're not.

#4 tanabutler

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Posted 01 February 2005 - 01:02 AM

I think you are mixing your metaphors, so to speak.

The Lion and the Mouse

Once, when a Lion was asleep, a little Mouse began running up and down upon him. This soon wakened the Lion, who placed his huge paw upon him, and opened his big jaws to swallow him. "Pardon, O King," cried the little Mouse, "forgive me this time, I shall never forget it! I may be able to return the favor one of these day?" The Lion was so tickled at the idea of the Mouse being able to help him that he lifted up his paw and let him go.

Some time after, the Lion was caught in a trap, and the hunters, who desired to carry him alive to the King, tied him to a tree while they went in search of a wagon to carry him on. Just then the little Mouse happened to pass by, and seeing the sad plight of the Lion, went up to him and soon gnawed away the ropes that bound the King of the Beasts. "Was I not right?" said the little Mouse.

Little friends may prove great friends.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Androcles and the Lion
A slave named Androcles once escaped from his master and fled to the forest. As he was wandering about there he came upon a Lion lying down moaning and groaning. At first he turned to flee, but finding that the Lion did not pursue him, he turned back and went up to him. As he came near, the Lion put out his paw, which was all swollen and bleeding, and Androcles found that a huge thorn had got into it and was causing all the pain. He pulled out the thorn and bound up the paw of the Lion, who was soon able to rise and lick the hand of Androcles like a dog. Then the Lion took Androcles to his cave, and every day used to bring him meat from which to live. But shortly afterwards both Androcles and the Lion were captured, and the slave was sentenced to be thrown to the Lion, after the latter had been kept without food for several days. The Emperor and all his Court came to see the spectacle, and Androcles was led out into the middle of the arena. Soon the Lion was let loose from his den, and rushed bounding and roaring towards his victim. But as soon as he came near to Androcles he recognized his friend, and fawned upon him, and licked his hands like a friendly dog. The Emperor, surprised at this, summoned Androcles to him, who told him the whole story. Whereupon the slave was pardoned and freed, and the Lion let loose to his native forest.

Gratitude is the sign of noble souls.