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Nonstick pans


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#1 g.johnson

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Posted 13 February 2005 - 01:06 AM

I used to be a purist. Wouldn't let them in the house. But first I succumbed to an omelette pan. Now, in our temporary digs, I've discovered that even a cheap aluminum nonstick is wonderful for risotto because it obviates the need for constant stirring. (Yes, I know the stirring meant to help with the texture but the last risotto I made was stellar, TISIM.)

I'll be buying a nonstick pan when we move back home.

Am I evil?
The Obnoxious Glyn Johnson

#2 mongo_jones

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Posted 13 February 2005 - 01:14 AM

there are other kinds?

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#3 Vanessa

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Posted 13 February 2005 - 08:10 AM

No, you just entered the real world :(

But I'm sure somebody, somewhere, is convinced they give you cancer.

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#4 Rail Paul

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Posted 13 February 2005 - 03:17 PM

I bought a Wearever non-stick wok for cooking on the grill outdoors. $10 at the dented and busted store. I figured I'd use it and then toss it when 700-800 degrees killed it.

A year later, it still works like a charm, and I use it indoors and out a few times each week. Can start something on the rangetop and finish it in the oven, or out on the grill

“Jazz musicians just get better and better as the years go by. I think chefs are the same way. You know who you are.”

 

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#5 beachfan

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Posted 13 February 2005 - 06:35 PM

As a physicist, I thought you'd embrace them. Is there some princepal that led you to conclude that non-stick couldn't transfer heat evenly, or provide long service?

#6 g.johnson

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Posted 13 February 2005 - 06:53 PM

There are a few reasons for my prejudice against nonstick. First, they're usually quite insubstantial so that, no, they don't heat evenly. You can't get a good fond. And, finally, the nonstick surface decays quite rapidly (this may no longer be the case) so that after a year you end up with a cheap aluminium pan than sticks with the best of them.
The Obnoxious Glyn Johnson

#7 ngatti

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Posted 13 February 2005 - 07:28 PM

I've mentioned before that All-Clad pans have small metal bits mixed into the teflon slurry. This causes food to brown and will facilitate the creation of a fond. I have used this and find that it works. I should add that I was paid by All-Clad. Though the results are my own.
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#8 scamhi

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Posted 13 February 2005 - 08:03 PM

I have 2 pans from Swiss Diamond Cookwear expensive, nonstick and worth it

#9 mongo_jones

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Posted 13 February 2005 - 10:49 PM

There are a few reasons for my prejudice against nonstick. First, they're usually quite insubstantial so that, no, they don't heat evenly. You can't get a good fond. And, finally, the nonstick surface decays quite rapidly (this may no longer be the case) so that after a year you end up with a cheap aluminium pan than sticks with the best of them.

i hear you--have had my share of those. currently we have a collection from calphalon (scored this via our wedding registry) which doesn't seem to have either of these issues. heats up well and, as long as we're careful to not use metal utensils and to not scrape vigorously, doesn't seem to scuff or scratch. and mrs. jones bought this incredibly heavy saucepan from hsn that is pretty good for making biryanis in (oven safe to 350 degrees).

my annoying opinions: whisky, food and occasional cultural commentary (current review: glenmorangie signet)

 

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#10 Daisy

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Posted 14 February 2005 - 03:28 PM

I used to be a purist. Wouldn't let them in the house. But first I succumbed to an omelette pan. Now, in our temporary digs, I've discovered that even a cheap aluminum nonstick is wonderful for risotto because it obviates the need for constant stirring. (Yes, I know the stirring meant to help with the texture but the last risotto I made was stellar, TISIM.)

I'll be buying a nonstick pan when we move back home.

Am I evil?

I have two heavy non-stick fry pans and I have been known to make risotto, tomato sauce, etc. in them as well as omelets. For most egg preparations, nonstick pans are superior I think. The one thing I unequivocally do not care to cook in a nonstick pan is a fritatta. The mixture doesn't 'climb' the walls of a nonstick pan the way it does in the plain old All-Clad fry pan or saute pan..
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#11 Lippy

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Posted 14 February 2005 - 03:33 PM

A non-stick pan with a metal handle is also great for pommes Anna and similar preparations.

#12 oraklet

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Posted 21 February 2005 - 03:19 PM

i'd say that non-stick is fine for egg preparations and fish - as long as the base is thick (6 mm or more) and the coating is not plain teflon (which will inevitably peel off however careful you are). my own non-stick pan is a 28 cm scanpan which is very durable and stable, though not as extremely non-stick as teflon. a very nice pan it is, but i wouldn't use it for anything that requires regular browning. no rich pan sauce to be got there, or at least nothing like what you get in a stainless steel pan.

#13 Ron Johnson

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Posted 21 February 2005 - 03:29 PM

I use non-stick for eggs and bacon. That's all. I have not found a non-stick that will allow a fond to form (I have not used All-Clad). I fail to see the advantage of non-stick when cooking other foods, but then again I am frightened by technology.

#14 Country Cook

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Posted 21 February 2005 - 04:29 PM

I've always gone for one cheap teflon pan for omlettes but I seldom use it for anything else. I like cast iron, stainless and carbon steel. :blush:
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#15 Guest_Suzanne F_*

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Posted 21 February 2005 - 05:34 PM

Nick, I'm curious: can you go back and forth with the NS All-Clad, that is, browning to eggs and back again and still have it work for the eggs? Does the "nonstickiness" not degrade over time? Does the manner of cleaning make a difference? I ask because I have many All-Clad, and love them, but only use the NS ones for eggs.

I found a slightly scratched NS KitchenAid sauté pan on the street (in Tribeca, where else? :blush: ) and its properties are iffy -- neither completely NS nor that good for a fond. But at least it is a nice heavy pan.