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Cork, Ireland


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#1 Rail Paul

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Posted 15 March 2005 - 02:07 PM

Nice short article in the Wall Street Journal about travel to Cork


Where to Drink: Dan Lowery's Tavern - (13 MacCurtain St.; Tel: 353-21-45-05-071). Or try the Hi-B (short for Hibernian Bar), The hardest part is finding the entrance -- an unmarked door leading to the third-floor hairdresser's. (108 Oliver Plunkett St.; Tel: 353-21-42-72-758).

Mutton Lane Inn, which opened in 1842. Its impressive beer menu features rarities with names like Kwak and Val Dieu Blonde. (Mutton Lane 3, off St. Patrick Street.; Tel. 353-21-42-73-471). And the Beamish and Crawford Brewery has tours that end with a pint. (South Main Street; Tel. 353-21-49-11-100)

Where to Eat: The English Market offers gourmet food stalls plus the Farmgate Cafe upstairs, serving traditional dishes including corned beef and tripe and drisheen, made out of sheep stomach in cream sauce with blood pudding on the side. (Princess Street entrance; Tel. 353-21-42-78-134).
For one of Ireland's best vegetarian restaurants, try Cafe Paradiso. (16 Lancaster Quay; Tel. 353-21-42-77-939).
Isaac's, a trendy bistro on one of Cork's traditional thoroughfares, offers something more eclectic (Ardsallagh goat's cheese served with roasted beetroot and basil vinaigrette) . (48 MacCurtain St.; Tel. 353-21-45-03-805)


Where to Stay: The Imperial Hotel's 90 rooms retain authentic Victorian charm -- (South Mall; Tel. 353-21-42-74-040; www.imperialhotelcork.ie).
Ballymaloe House -- now serves as an inn with 33 rooms and charming gardens. (Shangarry, East Cork; 353-21-46-52-531; www.ballymaloe.com)

Where to Shop: For books try Liam Ruiseal 49-50 Oliver Plunkett Street, or Waterstone's 69 St. Patrick Street. To buy Irish music, head to the Living Tradition, 40 MacCurtain St. Elsewhere, Paul's Lane, off Paul Street, has three antique shops.

What to Skip: Blarney Castle. The home of the Blarney Stone is as close to a tourist trap as any 500-plus-year-old castle can be. Nice gardens but the stone is a somewhat of a letdown, tucked away in the battlements. Entry costs 7. (www.blarneycastle.ie)

In fairness, the Blarney Store offers an enormous range of knitted goods, often seconds and irregulars, at huge discounts. They even process the VAT refunds, as I recall

“Jazz musicians just get better and better as the years go by. I think chefs are the same way. You know who you are.”

 

...Jonathan Waxman


#2 Jaymes

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Posted 16 July 2006 - 09:41 PM

Hey, thanks, RP. Didn't realize when I first read this that it would come in so handy.

But now, my daughter and her husband are going to be in Cork for a month. He's attending law school there, and I guess you could say she's in charge of keeping up moral support.

They just arrived two days ago and already (she told me on the phone) are dismayed about the cost of the food, and the difficulty of finding anything tasty.

I'm copying this article to her forthwith.

And if anyone else reading this has any thoughts, ideas, desire to hang with a couple of Texans, please let me know. They dragged their golf clubs alll the way across the pond, so golfing info also would be helpful, keeping in mind that they are students and on a very tight budget.

Thanks...

:blush:

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#3 Rail Paul

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Posted 16 July 2006 - 10:16 PM

Charles McGrath had a NYT article about touring golf courses in the north of Ireland a few weeks ago. The service he engaged specializes in planning golf tours, and obtaining visitor arrangements.

The Old Head at Kinsale is a relatively short distance from Cork City, and the golf course there is said to be very highly regarded. The area around Kinsale is quite nice on its own, we stayed there in 2004.

Irish Pro Golf Tours

“Jazz musicians just get better and better as the years go by. I think chefs are the same way. You know who you are.”

 

...Jonathan Waxman


#4 Jaymes

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Posted 16 July 2006 - 10:35 PM

Thanks. The photos at that website are glorious. But I suspect it's a little out of their price range, as my daughter is working fulltime as a school teacher in order to put her hubby through law school.

I'm hoping there exists such a thing in Ireland as cheap municipal courses.

Anyone have any experience with that?

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#5 Blondie

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Posted 17 July 2006 - 12:57 PM

I think the Old Head course greens fees are at least $300 :blush: A quick search turned up Fernhill Country Club in the southern suburbs of Cork City which is a very reasonable 20 euros on weekdays.

I'd recommend they ask in a golf or sporting goods shop for suggestions as well.

Assuming they are in Cork City, please tell her to check out the English Market for food shopping.
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#6 Jaymes

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Posted 17 July 2006 - 02:25 PM

I think the Old Head course greens fees are at least $300.


She told me that they went, the first day, to a course that had been highly recommended, walked in, asked how much, sighed and turned around and went right back out to the car.

I'll have to let them know about the Fernhill Country Club. Much more in their price range.

And the English Market as well.

Thanks.

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#7 Jaymes

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 06:12 PM

Just heard from my daughter with this:

"Also, we found a restaurant that MUST be talked about on your food board. It's in Doolin, right by the Cliffs of Moher, and called Bruach na Haille. The food wasn't just 'good for Ireland,' it was of the highest caliber anywhere. And, it wasn't all that expensive. We shared the goat cheese with carmelized onions appetizer and 2 people had the seafood soup. Those two (Wade and Ed) immediately ceased conversing because they were completely focused on the soup! Then, for dinner we either had salmon or steak and both were divine. Truly awesome dishes. We met the chef and she was so gracious and lovely. It was the only time that Wade and I have left an Irish restaurant feeling like it was time and money well spent. YOU MUST tell others to stop by that place. You either need reservations or be willing to wait for a long time. We naturally were forced to do the latter, but found refuge in the pub next door."

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#8 Rail Paul

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 09:53 PM

Brauch na Haille Restaurant

“Jazz musicians just get better and better as the years go by. I think chefs are the same way. You know who you are.”

 

...Jonathan Waxman


#9 Jaymes

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 11:05 PM

Hey, RP, thanks!

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#10 Adam Lawrence

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Posted 04 August 2006 - 10:02 AM

For good value golf in southwest Ireland, if they are up for a bit of a road trip and want to see a really traditional links - one of the oldest in Ireland - Dooks (www.dooks.com) on the Dingle Peninsula in Co. Kerry is terrific. I think the weekday green fee is about 70 euros, which might be a bit steep, but it's a whole load cheaper than the famous links of western Ireland. Places like Ballybunion, Lahinch etc, tend to run about 150 euros minimum. Old Head is obscene, and although the views are tremendous knowledgeable observers say the golf is lacking.

Cork Golf Club was redesigned by Alister MacKenzie, the architect of Augusta and Cypress Point, in 1927. The green fee is close to 100 euros, but I note they have a student rate of Eu20. I don't know the course but any MacKenzie is worth playing.
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#11 Jaymes

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Posted 04 August 2006 - 04:37 PM

For good value golf in southwest Ireland, if they are up for a bit of a road trip and want to see a really traditional links - one of the oldest in Ireland - Dooks (www.dooks.com) on the Dingle Peninsula in Co. Kerry is terrific. I think the weekday green fee is about 70 euros, which might be a bit steep, but it's a whole load cheaper than the famous links of western Ireland. Places like Ballybunion, Lahinch etc, tend to run about 150 euros minimum. Old Head is obscene, and although the views are tremendous knowledgeable observers say the golf is lacking.

Cork Golf Club was redesigned by Alister MacKenzie, the architect of Augusta and Cypress Point, in 1927. The green fee is close to 100 euros, but I note they have a student rate of Eu20. I don't know the course but any MacKenzie is worth playing.


I'm emailing this info to them today. Thanks again, everyone.

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