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Shad and shad roe


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#16 banh cuon

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Posted 14 April 2006 - 05:30 PM

Citarella has had the shad fillets and the roe for about a month now. The last time I was there, earlier this week, the roe sacs still seemed a little on the small side. Have yet to try any this season, but tomorrow may be the day if I manage to score any ramps at the greenmarket.

#17 ranitidine

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Posted 14 April 2006 - 09:01 PM

Headed upstate? Try it at Jack's Oyster House on State Street in Albany.
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#18 TaliesinNYC

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Posted 14 April 2006 - 09:43 PM

I'm reminded of Jean-Louis Palladin's Celery Root Soup with Shad Roe for some reason.

I think it was one of the first episodes of GC that I had seen. I must have been something like 16 at the time. The notion that fish eggs existed and so forth.

Ok, I'll stop now. :lol:

#19 Suzanne F

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Posted 14 April 2006 - 11:33 PM

Too late to help anyone in NYC, but Savoy had a shad festival recently. We went the last night (Sunday 4/9) and found that they were out of many of the parts we were all interested in, like the roe. :lol: But they kindly gave us small portions of smoked shad -- which worked beautifully, since the strong flavor of the fish is offset by the light smoking), and we could still order the entree of

OAK PLANK ROASTED FILET OF SHAD
bacon rasher, caramelized endive and "coq au vin" sauce


Basically, this was shad served with the traditional elements of coq au vin: bacon, mushrooms, onions, red wine sauce. It worked. And the bitterness of the endive cut through the richness of everything else. Do try this at home.

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#20 Melonious Thunk

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Posted 15 April 2006 - 12:00 AM

Lambertville, NJ has an annual Shad Festival--it's May 21 & 22 this year.

We went one year. I am often disappointed by the way shad roe is prepared. I expect it to be much lusher than it turns out to be. Usually too dry and bland in flavor. Does anyone know a place that serves a great version?
"Pippa, I'm going to tell you something and it's important. Sometimes you have to go to work."__Hannah Marie Konstadt, Two years, nine months.

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#21 porkwah

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Posted 15 April 2006 - 12:20 AM

why / ask / if / shaaaaaaaaads do it
waiter bring me shad roe

man, i need a headache


#22 omnivorette

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Posted 15 April 2006 - 01:51 AM

Lambertville, NJ has an annual Shad Festival--it's May 21 & 22 this year.

We went one year. I am often disappointed by the way shad roe is prepared. I expect it to be much lusher than it turns out to be. Usually too dry and bland in flavor. Does anyone know a place that serves a great version?

I just don't think *any* shad roe is going to be "great." It's just not a great food.

Make it yourself. It's easy.
"It seems a positively Quixotic quest to defend food from being used as any kind of social signifier, as if it could avoid the fate of each other component of our everyday lives." -Wilfrid

#23 Wilfrid1

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Posted 17 April 2006 - 03:50 PM

Citarella has had the shad fillets and the roe for about a month now. The last time I was there, earlier this week, the roe sacs still seemed a little on the small side.

In fact, the proprietor of Gramercy Fish is taking the position that all the sacs he's seeing are too small, and therefore have been illegally harvested: he won't sell them.

I don't know the regulations, just reporting.
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#24 Melonious Thunk

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Posted 17 April 2006 - 04:07 PM

Lambertville, NJ has an annual Shad Festival--it's May 21 & 22 this year.

We went one year. I am often disappointed by the way shad roe is prepared. I expect it to be much lusher than it turns out to be. Usually too dry and bland in flavor. Does anyone know a place that serves a great version?

I just don't think *any* shad roe is going to be "great." It's just not a great food.

Make it yourself. It's easy.

I have and I didn't care that much for it then either. I complained to the chef. :lol:
"Pippa, I'm going to tell you something and it's important. Sometimes you have to go to work."__Hannah Marie Konstadt, Two years, nine months.

'How high can you stoop?"__Oscar Levant.

#25 Wilfrid1

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Posted 17 April 2006 - 04:11 PM

I serve a great version. If it is dry, it has been overcooked. You want it just slightly underdone in the center, to get the creaminess. You enhance this with cream and bacon or pork fat, together with onions or shalltos and white wine, and accent the dish with fresh herbs. Eat it this way, and if you still don't like it, then you don't like it.

Many people post they don't like tripe because it's rubbery. It shouldn't be.

By the way, if it does dry out on you, or has been left sitting around - spread it on buttery toast. Maybe a few capers.
Elect-a-lujah

***Every Monday***At the Sign of the Pink Pig.

If the author could go around the place hitting random readers with a rubber hammer, the Pink Pig would still be worth a visit.

#26 omnivorette

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Posted 17 April 2006 - 04:15 PM

I serve a great version. If it is dry, it has been overcooked. You want it just slightly underdone in the center, to get the creaminess. You enhance this with cream and bacon or pork fat, together with onions or shalltos and white wine, and accent the dish with fresh herbs. Eat it this way, and if you still don't like it, then you don't like it.

Many people post they don't like tripe because it's rubbery. It shouldn't be.

By the way, if it does dry out on you, or has been left sitting around - spread it on buttery toast. Maybe a few capers.

I did it that way, on your recommendation, a while back. I liked it fine, what could be bad? But I didn't love it.
"It seems a positively Quixotic quest to defend food from being used as any kind of social signifier, as if it could avoid the fate of each other component of our everyday lives." -Wilfrid

#27 Daisy

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Posted 17 April 2006 - 04:17 PM

My grandmother always cooked it with bacon, and she and my mother loved it. I'm with those who think it is sort of tasteless.
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#28 Wilfrid1

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Posted 17 April 2006 - 04:20 PM

Neither of you have palates. That's why.
Elect-a-lujah

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#29 Steven Dilley

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Posted 17 April 2006 - 04:31 PM

Take care when adding the roe to a hot pan, as the sacs can explode and shoot hot egg all over your face.
Say what you will about the ten commandments, you must always come back to the pleasant fact that there are only ten of them.

--H.L.Mencken


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#30 Wilfrid1

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Posted 17 April 2006 - 04:44 PM

I cook them at a gentle temperature always. Nothing to be gained by searing, I think.
Elect-a-lujah

***Every Monday***At the Sign of the Pink Pig.

If the author could go around the place hitting random readers with a rubber hammer, the Pink Pig would still be worth a visit.