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#31 The Scream

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 03:05 AM

A former student of the mister's is in town. He's working at 1868, a restaurant in Jerusalem. Anyone been, planning on going?
Gone fishing for the summer.

#32 Orik

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 01:34 PM

It's an expensive kosher place for rich american jews who stay at the King David. I think it's considered good among its target audience.
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#33 Orik

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Posted 26 May 2010 - 08:20 AM

Two recommended stops in Jerusalem's old city:

1. The Austrian Hospice, 37 Via Dolorosa, hides behind a heavy door and a buzzer. Once inside, turn left after admiring the structure, and go on to the self service cafeteria (serving expectedly Austrian cuisine), get a beer and go to the back yard, which is one of the most relaxing spots in this part of the universe. Repeat.

2. Walk Beit Ha'Bad street until it splits three ways and you smell offal on your left. Turn and find a hole-in-the-wall with stainless steel trays of... well, it's hard to say of what. Ask for a plate or a pita and have the best mixed offal dish you've ever had. A delicious mixture of lungs, spleen, liver, sometimes brains, sometimes sweetbreads, I think confited and then doused with a superb spice mix. I can't give you a name or an address at the request of the owner, but you'll find it. There are other good things to eat in the vicinity but this is the best by miles.
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#34 Baroness Tapuzina

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Posted 30 May 2010 - 12:41 PM

QUOTE(Orik @ May 26 2010, 11:20 AM) View Post
Two recommended stops in Jerusalem's old city:

1. The Austrian Hospice, 37 Via Dolorosa, hides behind a heavy door and a buzzer. Once inside, turn left after admiring the structure, and go on to the self service cafeteria (serving expectedly Austrian cuisine), get a beer and go to the back yard, which is one of the most relaxing spots in this part of the universe. Repeat.

2. Walk Beit Ha'Bad street until it splits three ways and you smell offal on your left. Turn and find a hole-in-the-wall with stainless steel trays of... well, it's hard to say of what. Ask for a plate or a pita and have the best mixed offal dish you've ever had. A delicious mixture of lungs, spleen, liver, sometimes brains, sometimes sweetbreads, I think confited and then doused with a superb spice mix. I can't give you a name or an address at the request of the owner, but you'll find it. There are other good things to eat in the vicinity but this is the best by miles.


Orik, it is probably Jerusalem grill.
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"A gourmet who thinks of calories is like a tart who looks at her watch." ~James Beard

My blog: Baroness Tapuzina

#35 Orik

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Posted 30 May 2010 - 02:08 PM

Do you mean Me'orav yerushalmi? Nothing of the sort, this is much better and all (or nearly all) lamb offal.
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#36 Orik

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Posted 01 June 2010 - 04:04 PM

An unlikely recommendation in Tel-Aviv - Bayit Tailandi (Thai House) - a Thai run restaurant serving very solid Thai food with someone in the kitchen who (Pim, skip this) unlike almost all Thai cooks knows how to handle meat extremely well. Spiciness is toned down a bit for the locals, but the complexity and most of the required ingredients and spices are there.

Recommended dishes:

- Kana Naman Hani - Chinese broccoli in oyster sauce, chilies and garlic.
- Neua Ton - very much like Pho.
- Whole steamed fish (Branzino, can't avoid it) with celery.
- Moo Nam Tok - spicy pork salad

p.s. everything will seem about 25% too expensive, a function of the current exchange rate being about 40% too high.
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#37 yvonne johnson

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Posted 01 June 2010 - 04:06 PM

You are having a whale of a time, aren't you? Lucky yous. I'm enjoying all of the posts from all over.
It was not a new dish, as I recognised my tooth marks. Wilfrid

#38 Rail Paul

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Posted 01 June 2010 - 04:43 PM

QUOTE(yvonne johnson @ Jun 1 2010, 12:06 PM) View Post
You are having a whale of a time, aren't you? Lucky yous. I'm enjoying all of the posts from all over.


what she said, doubled

the weather has been excellent as well, from the reports I've seen

“Jazz musicians just get better and better as the years go by. I think chefs are the same way. You know who you are.”

 

...Jonathan Waxman


#39 Baroness Tapuzina

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Posted 10 June 2010 - 02:10 PM

Two other food bloggers (Israeli Kitchen and Foodbridge) and I have just launched a online culinary magazine called, Flavors of Israel. Come check it out.
--------------------
"A gourmet who thinks of calories is like a tart who looks at her watch." ~James Beard

My blog: Baroness Tapuzina

#40 Orik

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Posted 05 September 2011 - 10:57 PM

I'll write about the food later, but Tel-Aviv this week... fucking wow.
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#41 Orik

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 06:57 PM

Tel-Aviv Etiquette Part 25 - Locker Room Rules: "When entering a sauna make sure you can sit at least 50cm away from others. If this is impossible, wait outside until someone leaves. Remember that Jews are averse to overcrowding in warm, stuffy spaces." - Time Out Tel-Aviv, September 15th

Tel-Aviv is crazy. You don't often think of cities as being in need of psychiatric treatment, but this one sure is.

We landed a day before the largest demonstration in the country's history - almost 500,000 participants altogether, 300,000 of them in Tel-Aviv alone. It was a spectacular, peculiar, and somewhat embarrassing event. Cringe-inducing speeches, lack of focus, a hundred different causes all lumped together under a social justice banner. Then everyone went home (no results, for now) and the city was left in that state of excess energy you sometimes see in Steve R's patients as they ascend into a manic state.

300,000 is also the number, more or less, of Tel-Aviv alley cats. The mayor tried offing them a few years ago, which led to huge public outcry, court rulings against the city, and the formation of grassroots organizations that feed (successfully), spay and neuter (not too successfully), and manage this phenomenon in general.

The cats though, apart from the noise, are clean and keep to themselves. They don't add to the layers of rotting fruit* and dog shit lining the sidewalks or the fruit bat shit sprayed on the walls. They're also cleaner than hipsters. There aren't that many hipsters compared to other cities - I think really a larger class that exists is of the old bohemian genre - but there are some of them around and they run hipster places and wear hipster clothes (not so much into facial hair though, too close to the religious home)

Those old bohemians are the lifeline of Tel-Aviv's cafe culture - under constant threat by international and local chains, a few dozen independent strongholds remain. Some have particular selling points, like La Moulin that runs a very good French bakery, or Siakh Cafe, a sort of Coffee Nazi. Others just have some inexplicable charm - the one we used was Cafe Mersand - operating since 1955. At some point German TV developed a fascination with the group of old German-Jewish immigrants who sit inside daily (scroll to 1:19 for a surprise http://www.youtube.c...h?v=gfZhEAHTaCE ) but the crowd ranges from professional bums to movie stars. Espresso here is generally acceptable, if not stellar. Mersand keeps relatively short hours, closing around 11pm or midnight, but some of these places are open (and busy) until 3am or later and it's just not very unusual to go through a dozen espresso shots a day.

Once caffeine levels become dangerous, it's time to go eating and drinking. I'll write more about that in a bit.

* as it was explained to me once, I'm not sure if accurately, evergreens were planted along Tel-Aviv sidewalks by early settlers to provide much needed shade, but apparently when some sort of local fly lays its eggs in their berries these start rotting rapidly and fall to the ground as a sticky, icky mess.
I never said that

#42 Orik

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Posted 06 November 2011 - 07:31 PM

Before going on to specific eating establishments, I wanted to note that early September, this year, was offal season in Israel.

Most things have hardly any seasons there - all tomatoes are greenhouse grown, most vegetables and fruits grow year-round, if Hass avocado isn't available yet then you get some other variety instead, if there are no local lemons, someone imports them from elsewhere, there are no heirloom tomatoes... but offal has season because about three weeks before the high holidays, a very large number of weaner calves are slaughtered so the meat can age and be sold as what the locals call beef. This means the market is flooded with sweetbreads, tripe, calf liver, spleen, and other offal - if you go to a full service butcher shop you can often get this straight from the same morning's slaughter. By the time we left and stopped over in Montreal, I counted no less than fifteen meals that included offal in one form or another (only three of those at my parents' place), not that I'm complaining.

Another interesting thing is that the local market is used for beta-testing new products of the agri-tech and agri-innovation industry. This year some trendy things were sea beans, purslane, and some kind of pea shoots that someone had discovered grow well in the arid, salty land he owns. Next year I'm sure fashion will change.

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#43 Steve R.

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 06:28 PM

Tel-Aviv Etiquette Part 25 - Locker Room Rules: "When entering a sauna make sure you can sit at least 50cm away from others. If this is impossible, wait outside until someone leaves. Remember that Jews are averse to overcrowding in warm, stuffy spaces." - Time Out Tel-Aviv, September 15th

Tel-Aviv is crazy. You don't often think of cities as being in need of psychiatric treatment, but this one sure is....
the city was left in that state of excess energy you sometimes see in Steve R's patients as they ascend into a manic state.


I havent been since 1972 but, since I'm referenced, I'll add my 2 cents (shekls?) that it was like this back then too. Coming from Brooklyn, I was amused when my Tel Aviv bus driver got pissed off at the car that cut him off, took out a baseball bat, left the bus and started smashing the offending drivers windows. I was even more amused when I was given movie theater tickets with specific seat #s on them and then found out that it was necessary since folks were otherwise prone to getting into fist fights over seats. Then there was the very large roach/water bug that I tried to smash with my shoe but who got away by flying off. Who knew roaches could fly? Only in the promised land.

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#44 Sneakeater

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Posted 06 September 2012 - 03:07 PM

What happened to the promised restaurant write-ups?

I have a friend about to leave for Tel Aviv, and he needs recommendations.

(He'll be happy about Offal Season.)
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#45 Orik

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Posted 06 September 2012 - 06:39 PM

It was too crazy to write, I guess.
Lamb offal confit in a pita and other good things - Ha'Meorav - 97 Allenby Street

http://2.bp.blogspot...Sc/F2R1ZDm6tHE/

Habasta, where I'd have every meal in Tel-Aviv - 4 Hashomer Street

Hasalon, for a wild show and more than decent food 8 Ma'avar Yarok St., only Wed-Thu, very difficult reservations

From the same chef:

North Abraxas, 40 Lillenblum St. - this is a small plates, bad service kind of place, but again, pretty good food

And also:

Hamiznon - yet another place that puts good stuff in pita:

http://telavivfood.w...04/16/hamiznon/

Fancy imported seafood (Gillardeau oysters, Nova Scotia lobster, etc.)

Mul-Yam - old tel aviv sea port

Fancy French/Med/Alinea:

Katit -

http://www.catit.co.il/Index_E.php

Middle eastern -

Haj Kahil - http://hajkahil.rest-e.co.il/

Shila is worth a stop -

http://www.shila-res....il/index_e.php

Pronto is a good (and very expensive) Italian restaurant. If the owner likes your friend he's going to have a good time, otherwise just a nice meal.

http://www.pronto.co.il/ (click English on the bottom right)

I've been hearing good things about Berti, on 86 King George St. but haven't been yet, as well as about Oasis, 1 Tschernihovsky St.

A late night stop at Hageula Bar (51 Geula Street) is a must, feels even more so about half way through your third khat infused anisette. The facebook page should give you an idea:

http://www.facebook.com/hallo.carola

I can list some places for hummus, falafel, sabich, pastries, etc. if there's interest.
I never said that