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Mexican Cooking Project #7


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#31 prasantrin

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 07:38 AM

QUOTE(cristina @ Feb 21 2010, 03:12 PM) View Post
QUOTE(prasantrin @ Feb 20 2010, 09:42 PM) View Post
Thanks! I'm pretty sure I can manage all that (except maybe the chiles. . . will probably have to use canned jalapenos, which means just simmering the garlic).

Now I just need to find some corn tortillas!

Wait! If those canned jalapeņos are pickled (en escabeche), they won't work. If they're canned in water, they're okay. Make sure, please, before you start...


Uh oh. I'm pretty sure they're pickled. If they're pickled, could I use dried? I have some dried jalapenos I could use. They're not whole, though.

It sucks living in Japan sometimes! (But most of the time, it's a pretty good life. Just crappy when I want Mexican food.)

#32 cristina

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 05:36 PM

QUOTE(prasantrin @ Feb 21 2010, 01:38 AM) View Post
QUOTE(cristina @ Feb 21 2010, 03:12 PM) View Post
QUOTE(prasantrin @ Feb 20 2010, 09:42 PM) View Post
Thanks! I'm pretty sure I can manage all that (except maybe the chiles. . . will probably have to use canned jalapenos, which means just simmering the garlic).

Now I just need to find some corn tortillas!

Wait! If those canned jalapeņos are pickled (en escabeche), they won't work. If they're canned in water, they're okay. Make sure, please, before you start...


Uh oh. I'm pretty sure they're pickled. If they're pickled, could I use dried? I have some dried jalapenos I could use. They're not whole, though.

It sucks living in Japan sometimes! (But most of the time, it's a pretty good life. Just crappy when I want Mexican food.)

I'm sorry to tell you that salsa verde, which is what you're trying to make, is always made with fresh ingredients: fresh chiles (usually serranos), fresh tomate verde (what you know as tomatillos), fresh garlic, and fresh cilantro. I've never heard of dried jalapeņos, unless you are talking about chiles chipotles--those are mature (i.e., red) jalapeņos which are dried and smoked.

You can make chicken enchiladas using chile chipotle or other dried red chiles to make the salsa. IMHO, they would be really good! Do your dried chiles have a label? Let me know what they are and I'll give you a recipe!

I don't know much about Japanese cooking. Are there any fresh chiles sold there? Let me know and we'll figure something out. You might want to take a look at the current Mexico Cooks! article; it's a photo essay and some info about various fresh chiles. Next week, dried chiles--Saturday at 10AM.
Mexico Cooks!

The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing at the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

#33 fentona

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 12:24 AM

The enchiladas turned out great! I used chicken thighs left over from making stock, cooked with onion, garlic, peppers and stock: not attractive, but tasty when rolled up. The tortillas were from a neighborhood tortilleria and made this morning. They were soft enough that, after frying a few, I found that the oil made them fall apart rather than soften, so I just dipped them in the salsa. A little healthier, and I don't know that they would have benefited from frying the way that older tortillas would have.
'
I made two pans, one for us and one to give to friends with a new baby. I'm sure they will enjoy them too; thanks for the recipe, Cristina!
Andrew Fenton

#34 fentona

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 11:50 PM

I should say, too, that I had a fair amount of extra sauce. This afternoon, I added a couple of avocados, added a little salt, and pureed the whole business into some terrific guacamole. Which I am eating now. OM NOM NOM.
Andrew Fenton

#35 prasantrin

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 02:14 AM

QUOTE(cristina @ Feb 22 2010, 02:36 AM) View Post
I'm sorry to tell you that salsa verde, which is what you're trying to make, is always made with fresh ingredients: fresh chiles (usually serranos), fresh tomate verde (what you know as tomatillos), fresh garlic, and fresh cilantro. I've never heard of dried jalapeņos, unless you are talking about chiles chipotles--those are mature (i.e., red) jalapeņos which are dried and smoked.

You can make chicken enchiladas using chile chipotle or other dried red chiles to make the salsa. IMHO, they would be really good! Do your dried chiles have a label? Let me know what they are and I'll give you a recipe!

I don't know much about Japanese cooking. Are there any fresh chiles sold there? Let me know and we'll figure something out. You might want to take a look at the current Mexico Cooks! article; it's a photo essay and some info about various fresh chiles. Next week, dried chiles--Saturday at 10AM.


Thanks! I'll take a look at the article.

The only chiles I've found (fresh) in Japan are relatively mild (1000-2000 Scoville units, I read). Very little heat to them at all, so I had to resort to buying dried jalapenos while I was in the US. The ones I use are penzeys crushed jalapenos. They retain a bit of heat, so they're OK when you're desperate, though I would not likely use them if I had access to fresh.

I might be able to get my hands on some Thai chilli birds this weekend when I'm in Tokyo. Any chance a few of those might work with my tomatillos?

I also have canned chipotles in adobo. Maybe I can create my very own special sauce using those and my canned tomatillos? Too strange?

#36 cristina

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 06:18 AM

QUOTE(prasantrin @ Feb 22 2010, 08:14 PM) View Post
QUOTE(cristina @ Feb 22 2010, 02:36 AM) View Post
I'm sorry to tell you that salsa verde, which is what you're trying to make, is always made with fresh ingredients: fresh chiles (usually serranos), fresh tomate verde (what you know as tomatillos), fresh garlic, and fresh cilantro. I've never heard of dried jalapeņos, unless you are talking about chiles chipotles--those are mature (i.e., red) jalapeņos which are dried and smoked.

You can make chicken enchiladas using chile chipotle or other dried red chiles to make the salsa. IMHO, they would be really good! Do your dried chiles have a label? Let me know what they are and I'll give you a recipe!

I don't know much about Japanese cooking. Are there any fresh chiles sold there? Let me know and we'll figure something out. You might want to take a look at the current Mexico Cooks! article; it's a photo essay and some info about various fresh chiles. Next week, dried chiles--Saturday at 10AM.


Thanks! I'll take a look at the article.

The only chiles I've found (fresh) in Japan are relatively mild (1000-2000 Scoville units, I read). Very little heat to them at all, so I had to resort to buying dried jalapenos while I was in the US. The ones I use are penzeys crushed jalapenos. They retain a bit of heat, so they're OK when you're desperate, though I would not likely use them if I had access to fresh.

I might be able to get my hands on some Thai chilli birds this weekend when I'm in Tokyo. Any chance a few of those might work with my tomatillos?

I also have canned chipotles in adobo. Maybe I can create my very own special sauce using those and my canned tomatillos? Too strange?

Let me poke around among my recipes in the morning (it's just past midnight where I am). Those dried jalapeņos are NOT what you want for this, but we can get something great going with the chipotles en adobo. Umm...but probably not combined with the tomatillos. Too strange, indeed. Hasta maņana!
Mexico Cooks!

The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing at the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

#37 cristina

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 07:58 PM

OK, here's a recipe for salsa roja para enchiladas that will use some of your chiles chipotles en adobo.

Ingredients
* 6 large tomatoes
* 1 clove garlic
* 1/2 onion (preferably white, but yellow will do)
* 3 chiles chipotles en adobo
* 2 Tbsp vegetable oil for frying the salsa

Preparation
Roast the tomatoes, garlic, and onion on a griddle or comal until they are soft and slightly charred. Add all ingredients, including the chiles chipotles, to your blender jar. Blend until smooth.

In a frying pan big enough for the sauce, heat the oil. Pour the raw salsa into the heated oil and fry until the sauce is thick. Add salt to taste, as well as a bit of your crushed, dried jalapeņos, if you like.

Reserve the sauce for preparing the enchiladas.

Follow the recipe in Mexican Cooking Project #7 for preparation, starting with "Spray the inside surface of the baking pan..."

Provecho!

Let me know how they come out!

Mexico Cooks!

The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing at the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

#38 prasantrin

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 02:10 AM

And I actually have or can get all of those ingredients!

Thanks so much! I'm going to try to get corn tortillas in Tokyo this weekend. I know where I can find some, it's just a matter of getting there.

#39 Jaymes

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 03:59 PM

If all you can find are the pickled jalapenos, you can wash off the vinegar and oil. Yes, they are pickled, so some of that tang is going to remain. But tomatillos are tangy, too, and you probably won't be using enough jalapenos to make a difference. When I've lived in foreign countries, or somewhere in the US where it's difficult to get fresh peppers (like Alaska), I've resorted to those pickled jalapenos and they work fine in strongly-flavored dishes.

The Voice of America


#40 Jaymes

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 05:47 PM

Another thought -

Rona, I know you're in Japan temporarily but don't know when you're due to come home. I had a close friend that found herself in Germany for four years. She and her large family were fans of my quicky cooked tomato salsa, which calls for a lot of fresh jalapenos, charred and blistered. She tried many options available to her in Germany, but nothing seemed to work. She had been making buckets of that salsa probably once a week for years, and her family was really missing it.

So I sent her a packet of jalapeno seeds. We were both a little fearful that they might not grow there, but in summertime, they grew into beautiful bushy plants full of fat shiny jalapenos. In the winter, she brought the pots in and set them in a sunny spot where they continued to grow, although not so well as they had outside.

But by then, she had charred and blistered up a storm all summer and used the frozen peppers to great success throughout the winter.

So if you're going to be in Japan for long enough that you might have time to grow some plants and want to give it a try, I'll be happy to send you a packet of seeds.

The Voice of America


#41 prasantrin

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 08:47 PM

Four more weeks and I'm blowin' this popsicle stand! Three more weeks and I'm done work, 3 1/2 more weeks till I leave my apartment and head to Tokyo, and four more weeks until I fly out. Not that I'm counting, or anything. . .

I wish I had grown some jalapenos during my stay. I may just try the pickled ones, anyway, and just call it something else. I don't know what it's supposed to taste like, anyway!

Thanks for the kind offer!