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#76 Behemoth

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 03:02 PM

But if rabbit is the new beef, we are in trouble, because it still didn't have much flavor on its own.


more like the new chicken.
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#77 Wilfrid

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 03:43 PM

Wild rabbit has flavor. I presume there's some boring bureaucratic reason we can't get it here.

#78 mongo_jones

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 05:28 PM

"rabbit is the new beef" is the excellent first line of a wonderfully loopy essay called "junkspace" by the architect rem koolhas.

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#79 Suzanne F

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 06:12 PM

"rabbit is the new beef" is the excellent first line of a wonderfully loopy essay called "junkspace" by the architect rem koolhas.


Ah. Well, I didn't know that. Sorry. I don't read much outside of work stuff.

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#80 Behemoth

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 07:09 PM

Wild rabbit has flavor. I presume there's some boring bureaucratic reason we can't get it here.


True. I don't care much for rabbit but really like hare.
Summarizing, then, we assume that relational information is not subject to a corpus of utterance tokens upon which conformity has been defined by the paired utterance test.
-Chomskybot

#81 Suzanne F

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 01:41 AM

Tularemia?

I don't want to seem obsessed with this, but . . . -- Sneakeater, August 13, 2014

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#82 Sneakeater

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 04:08 AM

No pain no gain.
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#83 Orik

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 06:47 AM

Wild rabbit isn't hare.

You can get good results by going low and slow, which is more than you can say for chicken.
I never said that

#84 Wilfrid

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 02:52 PM

Yes, one of my most successful rabbit dishes was a braise I completely forgot about and accidentally cooked for some three and a half hours.

To enlarge on Orik's other point, wild rabbits are smaller and much leaner than domestic rabbits, and have a gaminess about them; but they are still white meat, whereas hare is very dark.

I am still fascinated by the fact that wallabies are white meat, kangaroos red.

#85 Behemoth

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 02:53 PM

To enlarge on Orik's other point, wild rabbits are smaller and much leaner than domestic rabbits, and have a gaminess about them; but they are still white meat, whereas hare is very dark.


I guess that makes sense now that I think about it. Interesting though, that considering all the game one eats here, I've never seen "wildkaninchen" on a menu or in shops. Hare is not as common as boar or venison, but does show up frequently enough that I eat it a few times a year.

Did not know about wallabies and kangaroos. For completely inconsistent reasons of cuteness I am unable to bring myself to eat marsupials.
Summarizing, then, we assume that relational information is not subject to a corpus of utterance tokens upon which conformity has been defined by the paired utterance test.
-Chomskybot

#86 Wilfrid

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 02:59 PM

Maybe all the rabbits you're sold are wild. You are in Europe.

I confess, I took an oath long ago never to eat a duckbilled platypus. But kangaroos are culled anyway, so you might as well dig in.

#87 Stone

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 02:48 PM

Does rabbit need braising? Can I treat it like chicken and just cut it into chunks and saute in some oil with herbs to get it browned and then put it in the over for 10 minutes or so to cook it through?

I'm looking for a fairly easy way to serve rabbit to a bunch of people who've never had it before. Last year the rillets were pretty much ignored, as was the ox tail terrine. Fuck if I'm going through that effort again.

And she was.


#88 Anthony Bonner

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 02:51 PM

Does rabbit need braising? Can I treat it like chicken and just cut it into chunks and saute in some oil with herbs to get it browned and then put it in the over for 10 minutes or so to cook it through?

I'm looking for a fairly easy way to serve rabbit to a bunch of people who've never had it before. Last year the rillets were pretty much ignored, as was the ox tail terrine. Fuck if I'm going through that effort again.

To be safe I would braise. Roasting if even a bit overdone can turn out dry.
Why not mayo?

#89 Suzanne F

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 04:50 PM

If you want people to see it and eat it right away, cut it up and fry it. Just like chicken (seriously).

If it's more a "take some when you're ready to eat," braising is better. Lidia Bastianich has a good one in Lidia's Italian Table, Braised Rabbit in Balsamic Sauce, that has garlic, sage, balsamic vinegar (that gets reduced to almost nothing), beer, and stock. We enjoyed it a lot.

I don't want to seem obsessed with this, but . . . -- Sneakeater, August 13, 2014

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#90 Wilfrid

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 05:55 PM

Yes, treat it like chicken. Domestic rabbits are fatty enough that dryness shouldn't be a big problem. Good with aioli (or just smash some garlic or other interesting things into mayo).

Catalan recipe in Google translation for edification and amusement.

As you will be grilling squirts oil is poured over.