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#1 bloviatrix

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Posted 05 June 2005 - 05:16 AM

Corby Kummer looks at some of the newest cookbooks released in time for summer.

Cooking
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#2 Squeat Mungry

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Posted 05 June 2005 - 05:43 AM

Thanks for the link, blovie. Both the Edda Servi Machlin and the Tony May reissue are on my short list.

(sort of OT, but I just scored Damon Lee Fowler's Classical Southern Cooking on eBay... for less than 90 bucks! woot!)

Edit to complete Machlin's name. I could swear I typed the whole thing.

Edited by Squeat Mungry, 05 June 2005 - 07:16 AM.

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#3 Guest_Suzanne F_*

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Posted 05 June 2005 - 12:38 PM

I can vouch for both Machlin and Mario, having been intimately connected with them (the books, that is ;) ). Just be aware that the gorgeous photos in Mario may not accurately depict the dishes. At least they didn't when the book was first typeset, and I doubt they've been corrected (too $$$$$). Still, it's got good recipes. And yes, Machlin is one of our foremothers -- Joyce Goldstein has cited her a lot. :o

And here is another new one to look for: Pie in the Sky by Susan G. Purdy. A baking book. The idea is: she has 100 (?) recipes that she tested at sea level, 2000-3000 feet, 5000, 7000, and 10,000, and made modifications so they work at every elevation. ( :o she originally kept calling it "altitude" and still may. Just try to ignore that slip. :o ) The charts take a little getting used to, but I trust that if you follow her instructions, the recipes really will work. This is a good one for you folks in Boulder (you know who you are :D ).

#4 SethG

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Posted 05 June 2005 - 02:41 PM

I checked Batali's MOLTO ITALIANO: 327 Simple Italian Recipes to Cook at Home out from the Brooklyn library a few weeks ago. The book is nicely put together, and it contains a ton of recipes, all of which are much simpler than the ones in the Babbo book. Many of the recipes contain one or two ingredients that might not be available at the local supermarket, however. Mario's enthusiastic voice is present throughout. I had hoped to hold on to it for a while and test a batch of recipes, but someone reserved the book and I had to return it.
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#5 bloviatrix

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Posted 05 June 2005 - 11:25 PM

I'm still hoping to score the 3 Edda Servi Machlan volumes this one is based on.

The ones I want to check out are Get Saucy, Eating Korean, and the Deborah Madison one.
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#6 jinmyo

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Posted 06 June 2005 - 12:56 AM

I'm disappointed from what I've seen from HOW TO COOK EVERYTHING: BITTMAN TAKES ON AMERICA'S CHEFS on PBS.

Bittman bites, man.

Clueless, incompetant, incapable, yet proud of it.

Stand up! Respeck! Yah!

The food only has to taste better than what someone who can't cook can cook. Smokin'!

Egad.



I haven't seen any books this year to compare to Bouchon or Les Halles, for example.
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#7 helena

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Posted 06 June 2005 - 01:55 AM

From Corby's list i have Get Saucy and Luard's The Food of Spain and Portugal and i find both being useful addition to my library.

Not inspired by Bouchon and still not sure about Les Halles i would like to get Bistro Cooking at Home by Gordon Hamersley.

Couple of chefs' cookbooks on my wishlist:
Neil Perry's The Food I Love and Gordon Ramsay's whatever.
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#8 SethG

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Posted 06 June 2005 - 02:10 AM

The ones I want to check out are Get Saucy, Eating Korean, and the Deborah Madison one.

B, do you make much from Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone? I really liked the Greens book, but for some reason I get lost whenever I try to wander into the magnum opus that is VCFE. Do you have any favorites I should try?
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#9 bloviatrix

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Posted 06 June 2005 - 02:55 AM

The ones I want to check out are Get Saucy, Eating Korean, and the Deborah Madison one.

B, do you make much from Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone? I really liked the Greens book, but for some reason I get lost whenever I try to wander into the magnum opus that is VCFE. Do you have any favorites I should try?

I can't remember the last time I cracked VCFE open. :o Greens, on the other hand, I was going through last week.
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#10 Guest_Rosalinda_*

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Posted 07 June 2005 - 12:09 AM

I'm disappointed from what I've seen from HOW TO COOK EVERYTHING: BITTMAN TAKES ON AMERICA'S CHEFS on PBS.

Bittman bites, man.

Clueless, incompetant, incapable, yet proud of it.

Stand up! Respeck! Yah!

The food only has to taste better than what someone who can't cook can cook. Smokin'!

Egad.



I haven't seen any books this year to compare to Bouchon or Les Halles, for example.

Well, someone famous you donít know said ones: If people get together because they are interested in something, it means that something interesting is going on :o
And that person actually have a TV cook program. Also very famous singer for decades :o

#11 Rail Paul

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 01:29 AM

NY Daily News

French fare as defined by ≠Susan Herrmann Loomis is anything but intimidating. In fact, as she outlines in her new book, "Cooking at Home on Rue Tatin" (William Morrow, $24.95), it's approachable and simple, while at the same time sophisticated.

I've enjoyed her previous books, so I'll prob check out this one.

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#12 lovelynugget

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Posted 20 March 2008 - 03:28 PM

Going through the list offered by my book club and there are a few books that look interesting.

New this month is:
Art of Mexican Cooking by Diana Kennedy
Beyond the Great Wall by Jeffrey Alford & Naomi Duguid
Spain & the World Table by CIA and Martha Rose Shulman

Plus, I'm also eyeing:
American Masala by Suvir Savan
Dolce Italiano by Gina DePalma
Arabesque by Claudia Roden
Asian Flavors of Jean-Georges by JGV

I just ordered:
Into the Vietnamese Kitchen by Andrea Nguyen


The Alford book looks very interesting. It's Chinese cooking from the interior, Tibet and Mongolia.
The Spain book is a compendium of recipes from many different chefs.

Any feedback on any of these titles?

And what have you gotten recently that was particularly good?

#13 rancho_gordo

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Posted 20 March 2008 - 04:12 PM

QUOTE(lovelynugget @ Mar 20 2008, 08:28 AM) View Post
Going through the list offered by my book club and there are a few books that look interesting.

New this month is:
Art of Mexican Cooking by Diana Kennedy
Beyond the Great Wall by Jeffrey Alford & Naomi Duguid
Spain & the World Table by CIA and Martha Rose Shulman

Plus, I'm also eyeing:
American Masala by Suvir Savan
Dolce Italiano by Gina DePalma
Arabesque by Claudia Roden
Asian Flavors of Jean-Georges by JGV

Of course I'd say yes to Diana Kennedy and I'd be curious about the CIA thing. They seem obsessed with Spain and I have another book by MRShulman and I think she's good.
I have the Suvir book and I think it really is geared towards a beginning cook. I would suggest the previous book for you.

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#14 omnivorette

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Posted 20 March 2008 - 04:15 PM

I'm enjoying this one:

http://www.amazon.co...e/dp/0781811449
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#15 lovelynugget

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Posted 20 March 2008 - 04:24 PM

QUOTE(rancho_gordo @ Mar 20 2008, 12:12 PM) View Post
I have the Suvir book and I think it really is geared towards a beginning cook. I would suggest the previous book for you.

When it comes to some ethnic cuisines, I am a hopeless beginner. I'll grab it from the library and give it a shot.

Is that Diana Kennedy brand new, do you know, or a re-issue?