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Today in the garden


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#886 tsquare

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Posted 29 December 2008 - 12:53 AM

The snow has melted in Seattle. I am afraid we may have lost the creeping rosemary in front, but have plenty more on the side yard - and maybe the back (haven't checked.) The favas planted as an overwintering crop look black - too much for them this year. Maybe even for the mustard cress. How come the weeds don't die too? Especially those cress like ones with the scattering seeds...The pampas grasses and ferns need a good pruning. Not sure if the Japanese maple will survive - it was already distressed. The trunk is striated with black...Parsley in the herb pot looks healthy, oregano too.

#887 jschyun

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Posted 30 December 2008 - 04:23 AM

QUOTE(Eden @ Dec 28 2008, 08:25 PM) View Post
The oh so tempting Territorial Seed catalog came this week so I'm "window shopping" for next spring's garden smile.gif

There WILL be asparagus, for the rest I'm still riffling pages & musing. The snow is almost completely gone from the yard now so I can stare at the various beds & think about what might work where. We have very limited full sun space so that is defacto saved for the tomatos & zukes (and now spargies) everything else is a game of trial & error & negotiation...

ETA how are chinese tomatoes different?

Oh I know, I'm gazing upon the lurid riches of the Tomato Growers Supply Co. catalog as I type this. Oh God, I love this catalog. I like the new formatting this year. New Big Dwarf, now that is a tomato with a sexy name. Big, tasty tomatoes on a compact plant...I might actually order some of that.

I really need to restrain myself though because I'm still working through the varieties I already have and I don't have enough gardener friends to palm stuff onto. I don't want to give them to just anybody because I intend on browbeating the recipients into saving some seed for me. *sigh* what's a girl to do.

Actually, I dunno how Chinese tomatoes are different. I got them from a seed exchange group I'm in. The varieties I have so far are called Hezou and Zhefen and I think both are relatively small-fruited red varieties. I'll probably plant them in 2010 as I have a really small garden. I'm already at max capacity with 15 varieties...oh who am I kidding. I'll find a way to squeeze them in somehow! Hahah!

Right now, the snow peas are growing, the peppers are holding on (made some decent kimchi with some of the last of the hot peppers), the kale is growing slowly but surely. The first crop of beets are almost ready for harvest.

My mini tangerine tree has little tangerines that are coloring up nicely. However, it's the first year and tangerines need to really root into the ground and settle in before the fruit get any kind of richness at all, according to the books. We'll see.

#888 tanabutler

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Posted 30 December 2008 - 05:37 PM

QUOTE(GG Mora @ Dec 28 2008, 03:36 PM) View Post
QUOTE(Chad Ward @ Dec 28 2008, 05:19 PM) View Post
I plan on doing a little guerrilla gardening this coming year, something my HOA frowns upon. I've only tried limited container gardening in the past so this will be something of an experiment. Do y'all have favorite seed companies or catalogs? There are a lot of them out there and I'd like to find a reliable supplier with a well stocked, informative catalog. Any help would be appreciated.

Chad

The ones I rely on are John Scheepers, Johnny's Selected Seeds, and The Cook's Garden. All have very good websites.


Renee's Garden has excellent seeds, and supplies lots of them to the UCSC Farm & Garden program.

I am looking forward to taking a class or two up at Love Apple Farm. Her "Grow Better Veggies" blog is definitely worth reading.

Cynthia's about to put twenty hours into an online project, sourcing the varieties of tomatoes she'll grow this year. I can't wait to see the results of that...

Our tomatoes didn't do that well this summer—they got the wilt or something, and we've got to swap out some beds for other things, like broccoli or cauliflower. (Lucky me, we get all our seedings for free. It's fun having a farmer for a BFF.)

#889 Eden

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Posted 30 December 2008 - 06:18 PM

I've had good luck with Johnny's seeds as well. Also with Ed Hume's seeds but those I can just pick up at the store. Being in the PacNW, where tomatoes are dicey anyway, I wait & buy tomato starts in late spring rather than try to grow my own from seeds. Ditto zucchini & cukes.

We have limited tree space in our yard so I think Grafting is my best bet for increasing our variety of fruits. Any favorite sources for scions out there?
A change of meat is often good, and those who are wearied of common food take new pleasure in a novel meal.
- Athenaeus

#890 joiei

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Posted 16 January 2009 - 03:38 PM

Tom Spicer is prepping his garden in Dallas.
"Love ya once, love ya twice, love ya more than beans and rice"

#891 Eden

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Posted 16 January 2009 - 04:00 PM

Somehow I scheduled a gardening day for today when the high in Seattle will be 40F - brr! but things are looking really sad ofter the snow, so it's in desperate need of some tidying... I think I'll go grab a couple of glacier pansies to tuck in for a little pick-me-up becuase it's looking pretty dreary right now.

The good news is that I can see the tips of a lot of bulbs starting to push up, so I imagive we'll have crocus-o-rama in another few weeks (IF the cutworms don't re-emerge & destroy them!)
A change of meat is often good, and those who are wearied of common food take new pleasure in a novel meal.
- Athenaeus

#892 jschyun

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Posted 23 January 2009 - 05:40 AM

My tomato seedlings are starting their third set of leaves. I can't wait to put them in the ground. I think I might get cocky an start squash soon as well. Probably some lettuces and spinach too.

#893 flyfish

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Posted 08 September 2009 - 11:11 PM


“I used to be eye candy but now I’m more like eye pickle"
Neil Innes

“Your father is going deaf. I can’t hear a word he says!”
My mom

“I hope to set an example, you know, for children and stuff."
Captain Hammer

#894 Daisy

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Posted 08 September 2009 - 11:27 PM

QUOTE(flyfish @ Sep 8 2009, 07:11 PM) View Post

So pretty!
Sardines aren't for sissies.---Frank Bruni
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The mistake one makes is to react to what people post rather than to what they mean.---Dr. Johnson
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#895 flyfish

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Posted 08 September 2009 - 11:33 PM

QUOTE(Daisy @ Sep 8 2009, 07:27 PM) View Post
QUOTE(flyfish @ Sep 8 2009, 07:11 PM) View Post

So pretty!

I love the rainbow carrots. I grow them in pots... no bending!
“I used to be eye candy but now I’m more like eye pickle"
Neil Innes

“Your father is going deaf. I can’t hear a word he says!”
My mom

“I hope to set an example, you know, for children and stuff."
Captain Hammer

#896 flyfish

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Posted 19 September 2009 - 10:48 PM

We went out and picked all the ripe tomatoes today, as there is a risk of frost tonight. But we expect things will be okay as we are not terribly low-lying. The cucumbers are shot, but we have swiss chard and hot peppers left. And herbs and my last planting of baby pak choy and some carrots, the latter two in pots and moved to high ground. Those carrots sure are tasty.
“I used to be eye candy but now I’m more like eye pickle"
Neil Innes

“Your father is going deaf. I can’t hear a word he says!”
My mom

“I hope to set an example, you know, for children and stuff."
Captain Hammer

#897 tanabutler

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Posted 20 September 2009 - 05:01 AM

Upwards of ten pounds of tomatoes from our garden today, with two pints or so of padróns. Naturally, a four-variety caprese.



And this pan of tomatoes, roasting for sauce tomorrow.



I cooked the padróns for someone who's never had them, and he loved the "dark green" taste.

With four days of scorching Indian summer weather coming up, I imagine our tomato and pepper output will be on steroids this week. The more, the merrier.

I wish I could make incense from the aromas in my kitchen. It's like the Catholic Church of Heirlooms.

#898 Rail Paul

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Posted 11 October 2009 - 10:04 PM

Sad day in the garden on Sunday. Frost is likely tonight in the hills of northwestern NJ.

Covered the remaining basil and rosemary. The last pepper plant (hot chocolate tear gas variety) is also covered with a garbage can. The last few tomatoes have been picked.

Scorecard:

Box car Willie tomatoes - good production, harvested some, but they went fast into the blight

Red Pear tomatoes - excellent production, got most of the crop before the blight

Cherry tomatoes - great production, but the drought followed by too much rain caused many to split

Trupti chile - good production, but the deer cleaned me out

Haitian purple chile - ditto

Genovese basil - prolific production, still in heavy bloom

Taurus pepper - OK, but the deer liked them

Extensive sage, parsley, cilantro, and lettuce growth in containers on the deck where the deer can't get to them

“Jazz musicians just get better and better as the years go by. I think chefs are the same way. You know who you are.”

 

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