Jump to content


Photo

Galway, Ireland


  • Please log in to reply
1 reply to this topic

#1 Rail Paul

Rail Paul

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 18,607 posts

Posted 10 July 2005 - 02:30 PM

St. Martin's Bed-and-Breakfast, 2 Nuns Island (353-91) 568286. It has four bedrooms, each costing $43 a person a night,....Brennans Yard Hotel, Lower Merchants Road, (353-91) 568166, It houses a pub, the Spanish Bar, and doubles start at $123.


Similar to those of pungent country cheeses found in France and Italy, the strong aromas of Irish cheese hit you as soon as you walk in the door at Sheridans Cheesemongers, 14-16 Churchyard Street, www.sheridanscheesemongers.com, (353-91) 564829, across the street from the historic Church of St. Nicholas, which dates to 1320. One Irish cheese to try is Cratloe Hills sheep's milk, but ask the knowledgeable staff what's at its best. . .

Sheridans downstairs food shop is open Monday to Friday, 9:30 to 6. It opens at 9 on Saturdays, to coincide with the weekly Churchyard Street farmers' market.

For breakfast, try a velvety raisin scone for $2.50 at Griffin's Bakery, 21 Shop Street, (353-91) 563683

Enjoying local seafood is a must - Galway's 51st International Oyster Festival takes place this year from Sept. 22 to 25 - .....Ard Bia Restaurant, 2 Quay Street, (353-91) 539897, www.ardbia.com. .... K. C. Blakes, Quay Street, (353-91) 561826. ....Scribblers, 3 Middle Street, (353-91) 865930, Monday to Saturday, 8 to 6; closed Sundays.


Galway

Sheridan Cheese

“Jazz musicians just get better and better as the years go by. I think chefs are the same way. You know who you are.”

 

...Jonathan Waxman


#2 Rail Paul

Rail Paul

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 18,607 posts

Posted 06 September 2012 - 08:32 PM

NY Times pays another visit to Galway. A lively city, open to the arts and fine food, but mind the hen and stag parties that take over on many weekends.



2. HIGH FOOD

Continue your tour of Galway history while adding some contemporary flavors via Ard Bia at Nimmos (Spanish Arch, Long Walk; 353-91-561-114; ardbia.com), a modern Irish restaurant in a quaint stone building opposite the museum. With wood tables and low ceilings, the setting resembles a country kitchen, albeit one with refined seasonal menus that emphasize local ingredients like pan-fried Irish hake with chorizo, mussels, clams, coriander seed potatoes and samphire, a coastal plant. Dinner for two runs about 90 euros, $110, at $1.21 to the euro.

7:30 p.m.
3. PLAY TIME

An 1820s courthouse-turned-town-hall-turned-cinema has been reimagined again, this time as a performing arts complex appropriately named Town Hall Theater (Courthouse Square; 353-91-569-777; tht.ie). The space plays a role in gatherings like the annual Galway Arts Festival and Galway Film Fleadh, and it is host to nightly events year-round. You might catch stand-up comedy, a visiting Polish cabaret act or a play from Galway’s acclaimed Druid Theater Company, which also operates the smaller Druid Lane Theater (Druid Lane; 353-91-568-660; druid.ie) nearby.

(snip)

6. MARKET DAY

Sample farmers’ fare in front of St. Nicholas’ Collegiate Church during the weekend Galway Market (Church Lane; galwaymarket.com), which showcases not only fresh flowers and produce but also everything from sushi to samosas. Afterward, browse the selection of Irish and European cheeses at the adjacent Sheridans Cheesemongers (14-16 Churchyard Street; 353-91-564-829; sheridanscheesemongers.com). Even better: Enjoy a wedge of Cashel Blue with a prime people-watching view over the busy streets from their second-floor wine bar.

5 p.m.
7. PROM NIGHT

Galwegians’ exercise of choice is a walk, run or cycle down “the prom” — a seaside promenade providing views across Galway Bay to the rugged landscape of the Burren and leading into Salthill, a resort area past its prime but now dotted with hip bars popping up among the fading casinos. After the roughly 1.5-mile jaunt from the city center, have a pint of locally brewed porter at the Oslo (Upper Salthill; 353-91-448-390; winefoodbeer.com/oslo), a former dance hall reborn as a microbrewery; or opt for wine and jazz in a Georgian town house at the homey Black Cat (179 Upper Salthill; 353-91-501-007; blackcat.ie). A few doors down, it’s soccer on the projector screen and Zlaty Bazant on tap at Krcma (163 Upper Salthill; 353-91-582-233; krcma.biz), a Slovak-owned pub and a gathering place for the central European population.

7 p.m.
8. LOCALS ONLY

Pale green paint lines the walls, and local greens top the plates at Aniar (53 Lower Dominick Street; 353-91-535-947; aniarrestaurant.ie), Gaelic for “of the West,” an intimate new restaurant that matches a diverse wine list with locavore-focused food. Artful presentations of Irish meats (free-range duck, wild venison), fresh seafood and vegetables are all prepared with local ingredients like gooseberries, ramson buds, sheep’s yogurt and seaweed. A four-course tasting menu with wine pairings is 60 euros per person.



Galway

I'm surprised the article didn't mention the Druid Theater and its sprawling operations in Galway.

Druid

“Jazz musicians just get better and better as the years go by. I think chefs are the same way. You know who you are.”

 

...Jonathan Waxman