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Mexican Cooking Project #4


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#31 omnivorette

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Posted 14 January 2006 - 01:22 PM

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Ceviche mixto
"It seems a positively Quixotic quest to defend food from being used as any kind of social signifier, as if it could avoid the fate of each other component of our everyday lives." -Wilfrid

#32 Jaymes

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Posted 15 January 2006 - 12:21 AM

Omni -- those photos look so good that I got that little "lime twinge" in the sides of my jaw just looking at them. Thanks.

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#33 extramsg

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Posted 16 May 2006 - 07:41 AM

Gordo, my favorite ceviches are shrimp ceviches. I eat them like mad when I'm in Mexico and then come back here and suffer constant disappointment in the quality of shrimp I can get.

When I make it, I'm using frozen shrimp and always par-boil them. I don't think you need to fully cook them, but I think it's recommended that you give them a quick boil for safety's sake.

However, in Mexico the best I've had were definitely made with raw shrimp. The texture difference was noticeable. But this was at places where they got the shrimp live that morning.

I think it's pretty well-established that Peru is the culinary home of ceviche and pre-dates the conquest, even though, obviously, the use of citrus was post-conquest. I know that there was some suggestion that tamarillos might have been used pre-conquest.

In Peru I think the most common accompaniment in a ceviche is red onion (julienned). At a Peruvian restaurant here in Portland, they do a modern version with green mangoes and passion fruit juice that is terrific.

I'm working on a ceviche report for Portland and another place has a really tasty ceviche that mixes in coconut cream and ginger to give it a creamy texture and balance the tanginess.

There's also another place that does one sort of Veracruz style, with olive oil, capers, olives, and tomatoes. Very yummy.

In Mexico, 99% of ceviches are very similar: diced tomatoes, diced onions, and diced fish, shrimp, or other seafood in a limey dressing with cilantro served with a side of tostadas, chips, or soda crackers. Very clean and simple. I think the most common mistake with ceviche is to make it too limey or to use limes that are too bitter and old.

#34 rancho_gordo

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Posted 16 May 2006 - 01:56 PM

I'm glad you bumped this thread as it has turned summer over nigh here.

"Gay people exist. There's nothing we can do in public policy that makes more of us exist, or less of us exist. And you guys have been arguing for a generation that public policy ought to essentially demean gay people as a way of expressing disapproval of the fact that we exist, but you don't make any less of us exist. You just are arguing in favor of more discrimination, and more discrimination doesn't make straight people's lives any better." -Rachel Maddow to Jim DeMint and Ralph Reed


#35 extramsg

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Posted 16 May 2006 - 04:40 PM

You must have brought the Mexico weather home with you, too. Here in Portland while I was in Mexico it was in the 50s. Now it's in the 90s. We're setting records up here. Uncooked food sounds a lot better.

#36 voyager

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Posted 28 January 2008 - 03:57 PM

Daisy was quoted as writing
QUOTE
I would love to learn how to make leche de tigre, the shellfish ceviche with a coconut milk base that I tasted at La Pollada de Laura.

Has anyone come up with a leche de tigre recipe?

#37 voyager

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Posted 29 January 2008 - 03:15 AM

OK, since no one has come up with something more authentic, here is a loose interpretation from The Breat Ceviche Book (Douglas Rodriguez) for a lobster ceviche which I guess you can adapt for other fish or shellfish:

1 jalapeño
2 tbs. chopped fresh ginger
1/2 cup (lobster) stock (for which I guess you could substitute clam juice, oyster juice, etc.)
1 tbs. sugar
1/2 cup lime juice
1 14oz can unsweetened coconut milk
1 1/2 pounds (lobster) or fish or shellfish of your choice
1/2 red onion, thinly sliced
1/4 cup shaved coconut
2 tbs. sliced green onion
1 tbs. finely chopped fresh chives
3 tbs. finely choped fresh cilantro leaves

Puree in a blender the jalapeño, ginger, stock, sugar, lime juice and coconut milk. In a non-reactive bowl, toss the fish with this puree. Sprinkle with red onion, shaved coconut, green onions, chives and cilantro

#38 Daniel

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Posted 29 January 2008 - 03:23 AM

My favorite fish to eat ceviche is blue fish.. I like cream and too much garlic and red onion. I am thinking that buttered fresh croutons might be interesting.. But I love those puffy corn guys.


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#39 Liza

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Posted 29 January 2008 - 03:39 PM

Daniel, try the jalapeno cheddar bread from Bread Alone - makes a nifty crouton.
“And another thing. You don't have to "move on" either. Not until you're ready. People say, Oh, you should be grateful. They say, Oh, it's time for you to move on. I'm like, What are you, a cop with a nightstick? I'll move on when I'm done playing the blues on my harmonica, thank you very much.

Really, people will tell you all kinds of garbage. Don't believe it.

You don't have to move on until you're ready.”