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#1 Cathy

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 02:05 PM

My boss will in Dublin soon, and asked me for a list of MF-approved dining venues. What should he not miss, upscale and otherwise?
You're only as good as your grease.


When working with high heat, the first contact between the cooking surface and the food must be respected.

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#2 yvonne johnson

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 04:16 PM

There were some suggestions here when Liza inquired.
It was not a new dish, as I recognised my tooth marks. Wilfrid

#3 Cathy

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 04:45 PM

Thanks, Yvonne! I searched for that thread and didn't find it.
You're only as good as your grease.


When working with high heat, the first contact between the cooking surface and the food must be respected.

-- Francis Mallman







#4 buckytom

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 05:05 PM

cathy, a very good friend lives in balbriggan, just north of dublin. i will ask him for recommendations.

here's a good site to start: http://bradmans.com/...blin/index.html

#5 Cathy

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 05:23 PM

That would be much appreciated, buckytom. Thanks for the link, too.
You're only as good as your grease.


When working with high heat, the first contact between the cooking surface and the food must be respected.

-- Francis Mallman







#6 tanabutler

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 05:47 PM

Cathy, a foodie friend recommends Dawson Street Said it was so good he's saved the business card for five years now.

#7 Rail Paul

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Posted 26 April 2007 - 12:52 PM

As planning begins for this year's Bloomsday, NY Times presents a 36 Hours guide to Dublin.


Dublin

The article mentions the Dublin Writer's Museum which sounds fascinating. There's also a mention of street markets, both of jewelry and Irish cheeses:

You'll see mimes, gents in three-piece flannel suits and stroller-pushing moms walking briskly past the windows of Brown Thomas (88-95 Grafton Street, 353-1-605-6666; www.brownthomas.com), one of Dublin's grand department stores. But for funky and affordable shopping, check out the Saturday markets in the Temple Bar neighborhood (www.templebar.ie). The Fashion and Design Market (Cow's Land) is where you'll find Irish designers like the jewelry maker Clare Grennan (www.claregrennan.com) showcasing their latest creations. The Book and Record Market (Temple Bar Square) sells used and limited-edition books, as well as vinyl records and CDs. And the Food Market (Meeting House Square) sells delectable raw milk Irish cheeses and organic produce directly from farmers.


“Jazz musicians just get better and better as the years go by. I think chefs are the same way. You know who you are.”

 

...Jonathan Waxman


#8 Rail Paul

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Posted 11 July 2008 - 08:08 PM

Here's another 36 Hours piece on Dublin...

QUOTE
Such is the fare at the Winding Stair Restaurant & Bookshop (40 Ormond Quay; 353-1-872-7320; www.winding-stair.com) where traditional Irish offerings seamlessly dovetail with nouvelle cuisine. There aren’t many places in Dublin where you can dine on a duck liver parfait with spiced plum chutney (10.95 euros, or $17.41 at $1.59 to the euro), followed by a parsnip-and-shallot tart with Gubeen cheese (19.50 euros). Much of the ingredients are organic and locally grown. Some tables overlook the River Liffey and, yes, the lower floors house a quaint bookshop.



Dublin

QUOTE
OFFBEAT BREWS

There’s nothing wrong with Guinness Stout, but at times it seems to be the only beer in town. For a different taste, head over the Liffey to the Porterhouse (16-18 Parliament Street; 353-1-679-8847; www.porterhousebrewco.com), one of the city’s surprisingly few microbreweries. The savory stouts include Wrassler’s XXXX, based on a County Cork recipe from the early 1900s, and the Oyster Stout, made with fresh oysters, which add a spicy note to the otherwise dry brew. Note: Bartenders don’t expect tips in Ireland, but if you become friendly with one, buying him or her a pint is a welcome gesture.

“Jazz musicians just get better and better as the years go by. I think chefs are the same way. You know who you are.”

 

...Jonathan Waxman


#9 nuxvomica

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Posted 11 July 2008 - 11:32 PM

favorite meal during out very short stay: L’Ecrivain 109a Baggot St., tel. + 353 1 661-1919 - very good lunch prix fixe and wine recs

also good: Chapter One, Basement of Writers Museum, 18 - 19 Parnell Sq +353 1 873-2266

and for lunch Pearl Brasserie 20 Merrion St. Upper, +353 (0)1 661 3572

entirely skippable: Ely Wine Bar
“Eat me,’’ it says. “Eat me and die.’’ -- Jonathan Gold

Everything is always OK in the end. If it's not OK, then it's not the end.

#10 Rail Paul

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Posted 12 July 2008 - 01:15 AM

QUOTE(nuxvomica @ Jul 11 2008, 07:32 PM) View Post
favorite meal during out very short stay: L’Ecrivain 109a Baggot St., tel. + 353 1 661-1919 - very good lunch prix fixe and wine recs


Menus are here, they look pretty good

“Jazz musicians just get better and better as the years go by. I think chefs are the same way. You know who you are.”

 

...Jonathan Waxman