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cricket, the thread


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#526 Wilfrid

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 03:33 PM

No: statistics, apparently, and its reliability has been questioned in the past.

Since the batsman should get the benefit of the doubt, its use seems to me to be a contradiction of The Laws, and therefore an abomination.

#527 g.johnson

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 03:36 PM

Bowl lots of balls at an undefended wicket. Terminate data at point 3 or 4 feet from wicket. Feed to DRS and calculated predicted subsequent trajectory. Compare with real trajectory.
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#528 TheMatt

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 03:38 PM

And how do you verify computer modeling of where a ball would have gone, had the batsman not stuck his leg in front of it?

By trusting us modelers. We promise to never use our powers for evil. Bwa-ha-ha!

Thing I also learned from that article: Dickie Bird is still alive!
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#529 Wilfrid

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 03:41 PM

A good umpire, but he never signaled out correctly (raise finger above the head).

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#530 Adrian

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 03:42 PM

Fascinating, despite my general lack of familiarity with cricket. I don't know if I can think of another sport with a replay system quite like that. The Economist's case is a pretty compelling one. Although one of the small joys of playing competitive sports is the subtle art of cheating; the ability to play within or just past the boundaries of the rules. I would imagine blocking would be one of those things and it's a shame to lose it.* Thanks for that.

*Although it doesn't seem quite gone. The trick seems to be to block just enough that the opposing captain** is reticent to use a challenge.

** Is there another sport that gives such discretion to the captain as cricket?

I think you need to interpret what I'm saying in a reasonable way.


#531 Wilfrid

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 03:49 PM

On your last point, yes there is quite a contrast between cricket and the major American sports in terms of the captain's responsibilities. Although there has been some erosion over the last decade, with ever more active management of cricket team, it has traditionally been the captain's responsibility to take all decisions once the team is in the field.

It's as if the Yankees played baseball and Derek Jeter made all the decisions about pitching, field placing and so on, while on the field. No reason it couldn't work, actually.

#532 g.johnson

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 03:50 PM

No: statistics, apparently, and its reliability has been questioned in the past.

Since the batsman should get the benefit of the doubt, its use seems to me to be a contradiction of The Laws, and therefore an abomination.

Statistics to the extent that there will be variation in the errors. But I'd be surprised if they didn't do something similar to what I suggested. (And it's a 4 year old article. I'm sure it's a lot better now.)
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#533 Wilfrid

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 03:52 PM

I just hate to think of cricket being in thrall to scientific hypotheses. :P

#534 Adrian

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 03:53 PM

On your last point, yes there is quite a contrast between cricket and the major American sports in terms of the captain's responsibilities. Although there has been some erosion over the last decade, with ever more active management of cricket team, it has traditionally been the captain's responsibility to take all decisions once the team is in the field.

It's as if the Yankees played baseball and Derek Jeter made all the decisions about pitching, field placing and so on, while on the field. No reason it couldn't work, actually.


Baseball, up until recently, had a grand tradition of the player-manager (Pete Rose was the last one in the 1980s). I'd love to see it come back. It would be nearly impossible in modern football, hockey too probably, and would be workable in the modern NBA. In rugby, the captain has heightened responsibility, although, as you say, there's nothing (from my limited knowledge) like the system in cricket anymore.

I think you need to interpret what I'm saying in a reasonable way.


#535 Wilfrid

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 03:59 PM

I think you're right. Rugby, and to some extent soccer, allow captains to take decisions on the field, but not to the extent that cricket does.

#536 Wilfrid

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 06:50 PM

Sachin Tendulkar became the first batsman to post 100 international centuries today. Now, 49 of those came in one day games, so they're not real cricket, but he comfortably leads the list of test centurions with - obviously - 51.

It's interesting to look at the frequency with which he scores centuries in tests: one every 6.1 innings, which is very good, but comparable with other heavy scorers. It puts another player's record into context: Don Bradman scored a test century every 2.8 innings. Of players who scored at least 15 test centuries, I can't see anyone else who comes close to that (Herbert Sutcliffe a highly respectable 4.9).

#537 Adrian

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 09:45 PM

Comparing anyone to Bradman is grossly unfair. By some statistical measures, he's the greatest athlete who ever lived.

I think you need to interpret what I'm saying in a reasonable way.


#538 Wilfrid

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 03:01 PM

Sachin Tendulkar assumes the position at the foot of the slippery pole.

#539 g.johnson

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 03:03 PM

I may have posted about this before.
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#540 Wilfrid

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 03:09 PM

Oh that's just creepily weird. I mean, Derek Jeter you could understand.