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#4036 Daniel

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 04:26 PM

The Savage Detectives- I am sooooo loving this book.. Robert Bolano wrote the book.
Ason, I keep planets in orbit.

#4037 Wilfrid

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 04:57 PM

Interested to know what you make of it, Daniel. I enjoyed it. It did get a little repetitive in the later stages.

#4038 Lippy

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 05:00 PM

Just finished Every Man Dies Alone, Hans Fallada. This book is a visceral experience.

#4039 Wilfrid

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 05:04 PM

I'd say it's a book everyone who reads should read.

#4040 splinky

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 02:12 AM

my interest piqued by viewing the steins collect: matisse, picasso, and the parisian avant-garde exhibition, this evening, i downloaded gertrude stein's "three lives"

“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
~Jack Handey

*proud descendant of cheese eating surrender monkeys*

 


#4041 SLBunge

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 05:40 PM

Just finished Every Man Dies Alone, Hans Fallada. This book is a visceral experience.



I'd say it's a book everyone who reads should read.

I'm just about done and I agree it is a must-read.

I'll be passing it on to a friend next week so I'll probably finish tonight.
Suffocating under a pile of cheese curds.

#4042 Suzanne F

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 08:34 PM

The 10 best first lines in fiction (from The Guardian, by way of Publishers Weekly)

I don't want to seem obsessed with this, but . . . -- Sneakeater, August 13, 2014

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#4043 SLBunge

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 09:44 PM

The 10 best first lines in fiction (from The Guardian, by way of Publishers Weekly)

How nice that they chose a photo of Sylvia Plath in a bikini.
Suffocating under a pile of cheese curds.

#4044 Wilfrid

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 03:19 PM

I guess it goes with the quote.

#4045 Stone

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 03:27 PM

Pride and Prejudice. I remember reading it in high school and thinking, "this is just a soap opera with a lot of annoying people." I like it better this time, but not as much a Jane Eyre or Middlemarch. (Not sure if it's fair to lump these together, except that they're all English classics written by women.) Also Barchester Towers. I've always meant to read some more Trollope, but never got around to it.

And she was.


#4046 Lippy

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 04:07 PM

Just finished The Closed Circle, the sequel to The Rotters Club, by Jonathan Coe. It was a page-turner, too, but somehow without the humor of the first book.

#4047 Wilfrid

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 03:33 PM

I am going to recommend Open City by Teju Cole. It looks like it's going to be a novel about walking around in New York City and meeting odd characters. It's much more than that, and it holds some shocks. Exquisitely written, not over-long, highly intelligent.

#4048 Daniel

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 03:56 PM

Interested to know what you make of it, Daniel. I enjoyed it. It did get a little repetitive in the later stages.


I hit a rut.. I am struggling with this book. But, I am going to China in 8 days. I am sure to burn through a few books.
Ason, I keep planets in orbit.

#4049 Lippy

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 04:30 PM

I'm reading Phineas Finn, the second of Trollope's Palliser novels, on my Kindle. I'm carrying around an entire bookshelf of 19th century novels.

#4050 Suzanne F

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Posted 15 May 2012 - 03:56 PM

The Man Who Changed the Way We Eat, by Thomas McNamee (the new bio of Craig Claiborne). Interesting because I remember his tenure at the Times, and it did seem to be quite a change from what was done there and elsewhere before. Not sure I care about the details of his private life, other than as they influenced his work.

I don't want to seem obsessed with this, but . . . -- Sneakeater, August 13, 2014

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table