Jump to content


Photo

Get a Mac


  • Please log in to reply
1089 replies to this topic

#16 Cathy

Cathy

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9,177 posts

Posted 17 July 2006 - 06:39 PM

Which email program?
You're only as good as your grease.


When working with high heat, the first contact between the cooking surface and the food must be respected.

-- Francis Mallman







#17 omnivorette

omnivorette

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 25,546 posts

Posted 17 July 2006 - 06:40 PM

My anxiety level is already elevated just discussing this.

Outlook Express.

And all my photos? Word and wordperfect documents?

All my links?

Ya know, a very entrenched Windows machine...
"It seems a positively Quixotic quest to defend food from being used as any kind of social signifier, as if it could avoid the fate of each other component of our everyday lives." -Wilfrid

#18 Cathy

Cathy

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9,177 posts

Posted 17 July 2006 - 06:45 PM

Ah, I thought maybe you'd gone all gmail.

A cable transfer would probably be the least painful way to move everything over. Copying stuff onto disks is easy, but tedious.
You're only as good as your grease.


When working with high heat, the first contact between the cooking surface and the food must be respected.

-- Francis Mallman







#19 TheMatt

TheMatt

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,137 posts

Posted 17 July 2006 - 06:47 PM

They still make G5 iMacs? And if so, why would you get that over a Core Duo machine?
Dr TheMatt
Certified Nerd and Oh So Boring...

#20 ngatti

ngatti

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,354 posts

Posted 17 July 2006 - 06:50 PM

They still make G5 iMacs? And if so, why would you get that over a Core Duo machine?


It's a dual core I-Mac. It's essentially the "G-5 in a box" replacement machine as opposed to the old dual proc G-5, which is now called a quad proc something or other, but yes, an intel dual core cpu.

This one.
yer 'avin' a larf, mate

#21 TheMatt

TheMatt

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,137 posts

Posted 17 July 2006 - 06:54 PM


They still make G5 iMacs? And if so, why would you get that over a Core Duo machine?


It's a dual core I-Mac. It's essentially the "G-5 in a box" machine as opposed to the old dual proc G-5, which is now called a quad proc something or other, but yes, an intel dual core cpu.

Oh, ok. Other than sadists who love hacking Gentoo on a G5, I didn't know anyone wanted a G5 machine again. Glad to hear you're not one. As for the old PowerMac G5's, they are being killed off in...oh..3 weeks or so at WWDC. Most people think the new pro Macs will arrive then. Although, with the power shown with Core2, Apple might delay to use that chip. Core2 is the main reason I'm putting off my new computer.

If you do go Mac, I would still recommend looking at Boot Camp, or if you are fancy, Parallels. I know a few people using Parallels and, other than a few odd mouse/keyboard oddities you always get with virtualization, they really love it.
Dr TheMatt
Certified Nerd and Oh So Boring...

#22 GG Mora

GG Mora

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9,234 posts

Posted 17 July 2006 - 06:57 PM

They still make G5 iMacs? And if so, why would you get that over a Core Duo machine?

No, they don't still make a G5 iMac. I'm guessing that was just an oversight on Nick's part...all that giddy enthusiasm. Nick, I just looked at the Apple Store; there are two iMacs, both Core Duo. The 17 is $1299, the 20 (don't know why I thought it was 21) is $1699.

#23 TheMatt

TheMatt

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,137 posts

Posted 17 July 2006 - 06:59 PM

Actually, looking around the internets, it looks like Core 2 is the main reason Apple is waiting until WWDC to announce the new pro boxes. I guess that means Dell, et al, should have Core 2 soon. Yay!
Dr TheMatt
Certified Nerd and Oh So Boring...

#24 nightscotsman

nightscotsman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 146 posts

Posted 17 July 2006 - 07:05 PM

My anxiety level is already elevated just discussing this.

Outlook Express.

And all my photos? Word and wordperfect documents?

All my links?

Ya know, a very entrenched Windows machine...

It should be fairly easy to export your links from your browser, and email from Outlook, and import them into the built-in Mail and Safari browser applications on a new Mac. You can either set up a network between computers or burn to a CD to transfer all the other documents and you can open and edit them on the Mac. You'll probably want to get the Mac version of Office for some file.

If you're really interested in making the switch, I suggest dropping by the nearest Apple retail store and talking to the helpful people there. They get these exact questions every day.

Here are a couple links that might answer some of your questions:

http://www.apple.com/getamac/
http://www.apple.com...amac/files.html
http://www.apple.com...tch101/migrate/
http://docs.info.app...ml?artnum=61459
http://docs.info.app...l?artnum=106778

#25 mongo_jones

mongo_jones

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 21,716 posts

Posted 17 July 2006 - 08:14 PM

My anxiety level is already elevated just discussing this.

Outlook Express.

And all my photos? Word and wordperfect documents?

All my links?

Ya know, a very entrenched Windows machine...


unless your photos are in some strange windows-only format there should be no issue with transferring them to a mac. ditto for word and wordperfect documents. no conversion should be necessary. if you don't want to burn cd's just get a usb hard-drive capable of holding all your files; then transfer them from the pc to the usb drive; then connect the usb drive to the mac. you're done. always good to have a back-up drive anyway.

outlook express i'm not sure about but i'm sure there are programs that convert those files as well. is there no version of outlook express for the mac? if not, one way out might be to install thunderbird, import all your outlook express mail into thunderbird and then transfer the thunderbird files over as above.

my annoying opinions: whisky, food and occasional cultural commentary (current review: glenmorangie signet)

 

facts are meaningless. you could use facts to prove anything that's even remotely true!
~homer simpson


 


#26 tanabutler

tanabutler

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,759 posts

Posted 17 July 2006 - 08:54 PM

While I agree with everyone about the ease of transferring everything over from a PC, I cannot recommend Thunderbird. A friend uses it, and it has some seriously strange behaviors...much like the ones at the Another Subcontinent forum that keeps me from using it. (Slow-moving, slow-appearing characters,

For one thing, the cursor doesn't backspace properly. The blinking I (indicating the cursor) doesn't sit still, or doesn't behave as you would expect it to, especially if you have a long history using word processor programs. I'm sorry I cannot be more specific, but I didn't take notes while she was showing me these behaviors. All I know is that, after typing a couple of sentences and trying to edit them, I was astounded that this program made it into common release. She was working on a big, new G5...not some funky little machine. I tried it on my own machine: glitchy and weird, even nonsensical.

Outlook Express users are recommended to use Microsoft Entourage for their mail programMore information at the Microsoft site.

Sorry I don't know more about Entourage...but will offer the encouraging news that many mail programs allow imports from other platforms, including folders and settings. I wouldn't be too dissuaded on that front. I know many happy recovering PC users who found the transition much easier than they had dreaded.



My anxiety level is already elevated just discussing this.

Outlook Express.

And all my photos? Word and wordperfect documents?

All my links?

Ya know, a very entrenched Windows machine...


unless your photos are in some strange windows-only format there should be no issue with transferring them to a mac. ditto for word and wordperfect documents. no conversion should be necessary. if you don't want to burn cd's just get a usb hard-drive capable of holding all your files; then transfer them from the pc to the usb drive; then connect the usb drive to the mac. you're done. always good to have a back-up drive anyway.

outlook express i'm not sure about but i'm sure there are programs that convert those files as well. is there no version of outlook express for the mac? if not, one way out might be to install thunderbird, import all your outlook express mail into thunderbird and then transfer the thunderbird files over as above.


"Nana, I just counted to infinity really fast!" Logan, age 5-1/2

#27 porkwah

porkwah

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,765 posts

Posted 17 July 2006 - 09:18 PM

as far as transferring files, i'd guess you could get an external hard drive that both the mac and pc can read and write to. write from PC and read from mac, and you're done. this isn't a bad idea anyway; this gives you a backup.

i saw 500GB external drives with both USB2.0 and Firewire for $350 at apple store, i believe. that's a fair amount of space.

man, i need a headache


#28 TheMatt

TheMatt

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,137 posts

Posted 17 July 2006 - 09:34 PM

The Mac Pros will use Woodcrest, it looks like, in cases not too different than current ones.
Dr TheMatt
Certified Nerd and Oh So Boring...

#29 Lippy

Lippy

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10,022 posts

Posted 17 July 2006 - 09:43 PM

Is it possible to have a wireless home network with one MAC and one PC?

#30 Cathy

Cathy

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9,177 posts

Posted 17 July 2006 - 09:49 PM

Is it possible to have a wireless home network with one MAC and one PC?


Yes.
You're only as good as your grease.


When working with high heat, the first contact between the cooking surface and the food must be respected.

-- Francis Mallman