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#31 Sneakeater

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Posted 06 September 2016 - 06:48 PM

I'm mainly talking about the times it isn't full.  I wasn't pissed off when I got the worst of the eight tables in Maemmo.

 

I'm definitely NOT complaining about the non-Meyer service.

 

ETA -- This is the culmination of ten years of being shoved into side tables at places in Europe when I'm eating alone.  It's almost like they don't want the rest of the dining room to see there's a solo diner there.


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#32 Sneakeater

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Posted 06 September 2016 - 06:48 PM

Also, I wish they had bar dining.

 

But you can't impose your culture on them.


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#33 Sneakeater

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Posted 06 September 2016 - 06:53 PM

I'm mainly talking about the times it isn't full.  I wasn't pissed off when I got the worst of the eight tables in Maemmo.

 

I'm definitely NOT complaining about the non-Meyer service.

 

ETA -- This is the culmination of ten years of being shoved into side tables at places in Europe when I'm eating alone.  It's almost like they don't want the rest of the dining room to see there's a solo diner there.

 

For example, at a restaurant known more for its views than its food, who would prefer to be seated at one of the two tables in the room that lack any view at all?  I'm not saying I expect them to give me a window seat -- although, in truth, why shouldn't they? -- but it was almost as if they did a calculation, why waste a table with a view on one person when it could be shared by two?  (And let me repeat, at no time during this meal was the dining room anywhere near full.) (And there was only a total of two tables in the room -- one on each side -- as bad as the one I was initially given.)


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#34 taion

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Posted 06 September 2016 - 07:24 PM

I feel like it's got to weigh more toward what Adrian says. As you pointed out, that calculation is just not relevant when the restaurant isn't full.


I didn't tip at Per Se either.

#35 Sneakeater

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Posted 06 September 2016 - 07:28 PM

I repeat:  by what possible reasoning could they conclude that someone going to a restaurant known for its views would prefer one of the only two tables that don't have any?  There's no possible way.


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#36 Sneakeater

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Posted 06 September 2016 - 07:29 PM

And if they DO think that, they are, as I said, clueless.

 

ETA:  I'm not saying they're malicious.  I'm saying they're uncomprehending of the wants of a solo diner, possibly because their dining culture doesn't permit for such a thing.


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#37 Sneakeater

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Posted 06 September 2016 - 07:34 PM

Oh, and just to give you the full context of this particular case, when I asked the Maitre d' if there was perhaps a nicer table available, he didn't take me to one of the best available tables.  He took me to one of the less-good ones (but still better than the one where I was originally seated -- as every other table in the restaurant but one was), and said, "I can offer you only this table, if you would prefer it."

 

Again, the room wasn't full, and never became full.

 

(And he shouldn't have been trying to accommodate possible future walk-ins at my expense, as I had a reservation.)


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#38 taion

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Posted 06 September 2016 - 08:04 PM

Well, no, it could be that solo diners in Oslo have different preferences from you, as Adrian said.


I didn't tip at Per Se either.

#39 Sneakeater

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Posted 06 September 2016 - 08:11 PM

NO ONE goes to this restaurant and prefers not to see the view.  There's NO other reason to be there.

 

And what's with this "only one other possible table" thing in a half-empty room that never became more than half-empty?

 

(To be clear, the second table -- the "only other one" he could offer me -- wasn't out of the main dining area and hence remote from other diners.  It was one of the tables in the main area that were farthest from the windows [although, unlike my original table, with a view out the windows].  So the assumed Norwegian preference we're speculating about would have to be that a solo diner wants to be as remote as possible from the view out the windows -- even when, at the diner's request, he or she is put into the main seating area.  What's the logic of such a preference?  Especially, I repeat, in a restaurant whose only staking point is its view?)


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#40 splinky

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Posted 06 September 2016 - 08:20 PM

if i went to a restaurant just for the view and was given a table with no view and no chance of changing tables for a view, especially when tables with a view appeared to be available, i guess i would leave


“One thing kids like is to be tricked. For instance, I was going to take my little nephew to Disneyland, but instead I drove him to an old burned-out warehouse. 'Oh, no!', I said, 'Disneyland burned down.' He cried and cried, but I think that deep down he thought it was a pretty good joke. I started to drive over to the real Disneyland, but it was getting pretty late.”
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#41 Sneakeater

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Posted 06 September 2016 - 08:24 PM

I was eventually offered a table with a remote view, so I stayed.

 

I could have fought for a table with the best available view -- but life is too short (and I'm too tired in the morning).


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#42 Adrian

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Posted 06 September 2016 - 08:31 PM

I agree that if I went to a restaurant known for its views and not its food and was given a table with no views when there were appropriately sized tables with views that remainder empty over the course of the evening I too would be miffed.

Wasn't my point though (my point was more the talking thing, no bar, etc.).

I think you need to interpret what I'm saying in a reasonable way.


#43 Sneakeater

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Posted 06 September 2016 - 08:34 PM

I get the talking thing.  As I said, I regret the no-bar thing, but understand it's not part of their dining culture. 

 

I resent the always being given a seat by the bathroom thing.  I resent it a lot.


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#44 Adrian

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Posted 06 September 2016 - 08:36 PM

I get the talking thing.  As I said, I regret the no-bar thing, but understand it's not part of their dining culture. 
 
I resent the always being given a seat by the bathroom thing.  I resent it a lot.


But there are euro places with bars. That said, a lovely bar scene can have an adverse impact on the kitchen and the room for non bar sitters. It likely doesn't help with Michelin.

I think you need to interpret what I'm saying in a reasonable way.


#45 Suzanne F

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Posted 07 September 2016 - 12:41 AM

So you (plural) think that a restaurant is satisfied with being "known for its views and not its food"? That the collective management and staff have no pride in the product they put out? Really?


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