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#1 Wilfrid1

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Posted 12 July 2004 - 08:22 PM

My specific needs include infant-friendly restaurants. On the fine dining front, I recall eating at Rover's in the past, and at two popular places near the fish market part of the city center - one was a French restaurant which also had a casual cafe open during the day; the other was a modernistically decorated bistro. Goodness knows where my notes are.

If anybody has suggestions near the center or the old historic district, I'd be grateful. Also, I'm sure I saw an article on five or six new restaurants in Seattle recently - but where? Can't find it on the NY Times web-site.
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#2 Cathy

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Posted 12 July 2004 - 09:06 PM

I haven't been there, but those who have (including our own dear Leslie) say good things about Lark, owned by Johnathan Sundstrom and his wife. John was the exec. chef at Earth & Ocean, our place in Seattle. I would imagine it's child-friendly. Tell 'em I sent you.

Here's a link to a recent Mark Bittman article on Seattle restaurants.
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#3 Guest_Aaron T_*

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Posted 12 July 2004 - 09:27 PM

Also check out Tom Douglas's restaurants. The last time I was in Seattle I ate at Dahlia Lounge (see link) and very much enjoyed it. The other restaurant I recall from that trip was Wild Ginger, a pan Asian restaurant, that is one of the better known restaurants in town and another place I liked.

Dahlia Lounge link

#4 Wilfrid1

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Posted 12 July 2004 - 09:32 PM

Ah, excellent. The Bittman article was the one I saw, and why the Times eacrh engine couldn't find it, who knows? Lark does look good - thanks.

Aaron, Dahlia Lounge is what I lamely described as "a modernistically decorated bistro" - it was good, so thanks for reminding me.

I also have a memory of some middling restaurants with nice terrace seating overlooking the water.
Elect-a-lujah

***Every Monday***At the Sign of the Pink Pig.

If the author could go around the place hitting random readers with a rubber hammer, the Pink Pig would still be worth a visit.

#5 Leslie

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Posted 13 July 2004 - 12:47 AM

Leslie's Recs...

Harvest Vine- Excellent Basque/Spanish tapas, wonderful, and I highly recommend, expensive.
Not normally considered a kid friendly place, I've seen a toddler there before with a couple seated at a table by an open area near sidewalk , and elementary aged kids sitting at the tapas bar, so I would say give it a go! I suggest to go early when they open, as they don't take res. and it fills up quickly. My favorite dinner last year.
2701 E Madison St (Madison Park Neighborhood)
Seattle, WA 98112-4761
Phone: (206) 320-9771
Dinner only

Lark- ditto what Cathy said. Highly recommend. My favorite dinner this year was at Lark. My suggestion is to go early ie. 5pm when they open, both in terms of toddler, and as they don't take reservations and get full quick, and people wait a long time for a table after that. expensive or not depending on how many small plates you order (as with Harvest Vine) but worth every penny. :)
926 12th Ave (Capital Hill Neighborhood)
Seattle, WA 98122-4412
Phone: (206) 323-5275
Dinner only

Flying Fish (probably better at lunch for kids than dinner, or go for early dinner.. I've sat at the bar when they open, ie. 5pm, and the place is very quiet and almost empty)
Try their wonderful fried razor clams (appetizer) w/housemade tarter sauce & coleslaw. Excellent fresh fish, too and reasonably priced. Some people don't like the vibe here as it's kind of a trendy place and can get noisy, but go early, I like it. Kiku also liked this place when he was here (he went twice).
2234 First Avenue (Belltown neighborhood, near downtown)
Seattle, Washington
(206) 728-8595
Lunch or dinner (they have booster seats, no high chairs).

Chinook's At Salmon Bay - Very kid friendly, featuring reasonably priced Seafood (not cutting edge cuisine, this is regular fare, but they also serve fried razor clams, too, one of our local specialties. Also good fish tacos, Joey's Special (w/oysters), fried oysters, fresh fish. My family gets together here at least once every year or so for lunch. It's located on the water at beautiful Fisherman's Terminal w/view of commercial fishing fleet and marina and a memorial to local fishermen lost at sea. Next door is an excellent fish market, where maybe you can buy a fresh dungeness crab and smoked salmon to snack on in the park later or back at your room, ask them to clean and crack it for you if possible). Some people even buy fresh fish off the boats coming in (I've always wanted to do that!). There is also an interesting NW art and jewelry store next door.
1900 W Nickerson St (tricky to find so have a Seattle map w/you)
Seattle, WA 98119-1661
Phone: (206) 283-4665
Lunch or dinner (bfast only on weekends) (they have both booster seats and Highchairs)

Go to Pike Place Market and just graze your way through. :)

A trip to Uwajimaya Asian Market in the International district is always fun. It's the largest asian grocery store/market in the NW and it's upscale. I love that place! Gorgeous varieties of asian produce, you can buy various cut sashimi or sushi to go (try the fresh geoduck sashimi, a local specialty, yum). They also sell Washyugu Beef, a Kobe Style beef.

Will try to think of some more ideas for you that are kid friendly and good and hopefully tighe will chime in, too, (he will in about 2 weeks have an infant) ... :)

edit to add: Wilfrid, I'm still checking on booster seats/high chairs for Lark and Harvest Vine and will call for any other places you are interested in, just let me know either here or by PM :)

#6 tighe

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Posted 13 July 2004 - 06:35 AM

Since I'm very soon going to be in the market for infant-friendly restaurants, I guess I should be able to come up with something good here... ;)

My favorite restaurant in Seattle right now is Union. I've seen children of all ages there and I think its casual enough that if you need to play bounce the baby for a while, no one is going to look askance. The food is ingredients driven, fresh, simple and interesting combinations of flavors. The chef is very young and very talented. Bittman missed the boat by not including Union in his article.

The French place near the market you're referring to is Campagne and it's little sister Cafe Campagne. The cafe would be appropriate with a child, but you might want to consider a couple other places close-by instead. Le Pichet is a fairly accurate re-creation of a French bistro, very casual and great food. Also in the same building, but upstairs, is one of Seattle's hidded jewels: Matt's in the Market. Tiny, funky place where everything they cook is done on two portable gas burners, and you'd never know it...

Probably the nicest place in town that is know for being actively welcoming to children is Kaspar's. It's been quite a while since I've been, but when it's good, it can be excellent.

If you're interested in sushi, there's a number of places that are good and would work with a child. My favorite (and Leslie's too I think) is Mashiko. The only down-side being that it's some distance from downtown.

More questions?...fire away....

Edited to add one last place...if you like Greek food and don't already get enough of it in New York, I think Porta is the best I've had anywhere....
It may have been Camelot for Jack and Jacqueline
But on the Che Guevara highway filling up with gasoline
Fidel Castro's brother spies a rich lady who's crying
Over luxury's dissapointment
So he walks over and he's trying
To sympathize with her, but thinks that he should warn her
That the Thirld World is just around the corner

#7 Leslie

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Posted 13 July 2004 - 02:00 PM

My favorite restaurant in Seattle right now is Union.  I've seen children of all ages there and I think its casual enough that if you need to play bounce the baby for a while, no one is going to look askance.  The food is ingredients driven, fresh, simple and interesting combinations of flavors.  The chef is very young and very talented.  Bittman missed the boat by not including Union in his article.

I agree with tighe on Union. Excellent. I called them last night and they don't have booster seats nor high chairs, though, so I didn't include them in the list, but if baby can sit on the lap, there you go! They are open for lunch and dinner. For dinner, again i would suggest the earlier the better as they are less busy then, although they do take reservations. They are downtown. Expensive.

Like tighe, I also love Matt's in the Market and will call them today about booster seats. I'm quite certain they don't have high chairs. It's a tiny place, but excellently regarded by all who go. I recall Evelyn had an excellent meal at Matt's, too, while visiting Seattle. Lunch and Dinner (closed Mondays). Moderate priced.

When I checked the gocitykids.com site, they recommended Etta's (at the end of Pike Place market about 1/2 block north of it). It's one of Tom Douglas' 3 restaurants and they are open for lunch, dinner and weekend brunch. I read they have high chairs, and crayons and a kids menu to color. It's been a few years since I've been, but I would give it a thumbs up, especially before or after a stroll through the Pike Place Market if that is in your plans. Their site is www.tomdouglas.com with a sample menu to view. I would also take this opportunity to point out that Seattle restaurants can have consistancy problems, and Etta's is not immune to this either. Tom doesn't seem to cook at any of his restaurants any more, does he? Moderate priced.

If you find yourself down at Seattle's main waterfront, gocitykids.com also recommends Steamers, where one can sit inside in a roomy booth or outside with your kids on a sunny day, take in the great view, with a bowl of steamer clams or fish n chips. I read they have disposable bibs, crayons and plenty of high chairs. If you go, I would suggest sitting outside, it's a great vibe sitting out by the Seattle waterfront. This is not a destination restaurant, casual, and just if you are strolling the waterfront and hungry for clams and a glass of beer on a sunny day. Inexpensive.

Another waterfront choice would be Elliott's. However I only recommend them for fresh cracked dungeness crab, or a crab cocktail, and their wonderful selection of fresh oysters on the half shell (although summer is not the best time for oysters). Do not order anything other than those 2 things I mentioned though, as other things there have disappointed me. Seattle's waterfront is not known for good restaurants, unfortunately. Expensive.

#8 Abbylovi

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Posted 13 July 2004 - 02:15 PM

Ooooh. I'll be in Seattle in a couple of months and would love to know low and middle end as well.
It is better to have beans and bacon in peace than cakes and ale in fear.

#9 Leslie

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Posted 13 July 2004 - 02:38 PM

Ooooh. I'll be in Seattle in a couple of months and would love to know low and middle end as well.

Great Abby! We'll come up with a list, but some of these places will overlap with those mentioned already. Many Seattle restaurants by NY standards would be considered moderate or inexpensive. In my reviews, expensive is by Seattle standards. What do you think tighe?

One of my favorite areas to eat inexpensively is the Little Saigon area (just up the hill from the International District) (lots of tasty mom and pop Vietnamese places) and a good Chinese place (Seven Stars Pepper).

We'll also list a few highlights of things to do while in the area, ie. Mt. Rainier (3 hrs away), Woodland Park Zoo, the Ballard Locks (ship canal) and fish ladder, various beaches, Pike Place, etc. I hope you will get a chance to get up to Vancouver, too.

#10 Wilfrid1

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Posted 13 July 2004 - 02:43 PM

Thanks, there's plenty here - I only wish I was staying longer. Campagne was indeed the place I was thinking of. And Pike Market is a certainty. I need to think about the recommendations here.
Elect-a-lujah

***Every Monday***At the Sign of the Pink Pig.

If the author could go around the place hitting random readers with a rubber hammer, the Pink Pig would still be worth a visit.

#11 Leslie

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Posted 13 July 2004 - 03:37 PM

Some good inexpensive eats that come to mind:

Brasa Bar menu, 1/2 price between 5-7pm (with the purchase of a drink). One of Seattle's best deals and a favorite with PNWers. Click here for menu

Salumi for lunch in Pioneer Square area. It's Mario Batali's dad's place. Housemade salumis, and good sandwiches (even if the bread is a bit too big), gnocchi. Very small place, arrive early (ie 11 am when they open) to get a seat, or stand in line to get something to go.

Inexpensive Pike Place Market recs...

Market Grill - in the heart of Pike Place Market. Grab a stool and order one of their delicious grilled salmon or grilled halibut sandwiches.

On the run in the market you can also grab a piroshky at My Favorite Piroshky, or a sausage at Uli's sausage (next to Pure Food Fishmarket inside the market), or Vietnamese Spring Rolls at Saigon Restaurant. Dish D'Lish (Cathy Casey's place) is also recommended for upscale take out picnic fare. I'd highly recommend lunch at Matt's in the Market (sit at the counter if possible to watch them cook and chat with the chef). At the Pike Place market also I tend to treat myself to a few guilty pleasures, like a small bag of fried chicken gizzards, too, yum. :ph43r:

Little Saigon, 12th and Jackson area has many good Vietnamese places for bahn mi and pho and fried spring rolls and fresh summer rolls. Pho Bac, Malay Satay Hut (get the roti), Seattle Deli, it's hard to go wrong up there.

Lunch is definitely a good time to go to the International district to take advantage of their lunch specials, usually around $6. For Chinese barbequed pork or Duck, I like Kau Kau best. Seattle dim sum is weak, though, I think, and Chinese in Seattle is generally not a stand out. Seven Stars Pepper at 12th and Jackson is considered the favorite by locals and chefs.

#12 Rail Paul

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Posted 13 July 2004 - 04:00 PM

I'd agree on Dahlia Lounge as child friendly and stylish (not an easy combination for many places).

Also, I'd like to mention Vivanda, an upscale, vaguely French inspired place at the end of Pine Street, where it meets the Public Market. I was quite pleased with a meal there last Fall. I believe it's directly across Pine from Campana and almost opposite the Inn at the Market.

There's a mozzarella maker on the corner, as I recall. The bounty of fresh foods, fish, and meats is awe-inspiring. It must be wonderful to live and cook in the Northwest.
Dreams come in all sizes, shapes, and colors.

#13 tighe

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Posted 13 July 2004 - 05:15 PM

Ooooh. I'll be in Seattle in a couple of months and would love to know low and middle end as well.

First, some nitpicking.... :o

I object to characterizing Union as 'expensive'. In fact, their $48, 7-course dinner is one of the greatest dining values around. It's certainly possible to spend rack up a big tab there, but my average dinner there is less than at places like Harvest Vine or Lark.

Now back to our regularly scheduled mid to low-end recommendations....

Many of the places that I mentioned in my initial post would fall squarely in the mid-range, including Le Pichet, Cafe Campagne, Porta, Matt's and Mashiko.

Leslie's suggestions in the International District/Little Saigon are excellent. That whole area is one big food bargain. Bahn mi sandwiches may be the best food value in the world.

For the most part, the really great dining values aren't downtown, so I'm suggesting a few options that are still in the city, but outside of the core.

Just east of downtown on Capital Hill is a great Italian place called Osteria La Spiga that serves rustic Romagnolan food, featuring piadina sandwiches (1 of 2 places in the US that serves them), simple pasta dishes and great soups. This might be a good place for Wilf's child-friendly list too. In the same general area is a place called Crave that I like very much.

Jones Barbeque, a little ways south of downtown, is very good, at least by Seattle standards.

There is some outstanding authentic Mexican food in the South Park neighborhood, 10-15 minutes south of downtown. Muy Macho is my favorite among the 4 or 5 places.
It may have been Camelot for Jack and Jacqueline
But on the Che Guevara highway filling up with gasoline
Fidel Castro's brother spies a rich lady who's crying
Over luxury's dissapointment
So he walks over and he's trying
To sympathize with her, but thinks that he should warn her
That the Thirld World is just around the corner

#14 Abbylovi

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Posted 13 July 2004 - 05:57 PM

Ooooh. I'll be in Seattle in a couple of months and would love to know low and middle end as well.

First, some nitpicking.... :o

I object to characterizing Union as 'expensive'. In fact, their $48, 7-course dinner is one of the greatest dining values around. It's certainly possible to spend rack up a big tab there, but my average dinner there is less than at places like Harvest Vine or Lark.

Don't mind me, I was just barging in on the thread and stating my wants and desires. I certainly wasn't implying that Union is expensive.
It is better to have beans and bacon in peace than cakes and ale in fear.

#15 tighe

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Posted 13 July 2004 - 06:02 PM

Ooooh. I'll be in Seattle in a couple of months and would love to know low and middle end as well.

First, some nitpicking.... :o

I object to characterizing Union as 'expensive'. In fact, their $48, 7-course dinner is one of the greatest dining values around. It's certainly possible to spend rack up a big tab there, but my average dinner there is less than at places like Harvest Vine or Lark.

Don't mind me, I was just barging in on the thread and stating my wants and desires. I certainly wasn't implying that Union is expensive.

Sorry, poor use of quoting and sequencing. I was actually responding to Leslie stating that Union was "Expensive".
It may have been Camelot for Jack and Jacqueline
But on the Che Guevara highway filling up with gasoline
Fidel Castro's brother spies a rich lady who's crying
Over luxury's dissapointment
So he walks over and he's trying
To sympathize with her, but thinks that he should warn her
That the Thirld World is just around the corner