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#16 Wilfrid1

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Posted 20 July 2004 - 02:58 PM

Expectations are very different. Some might recall the Brothers Majumdar raving about the steak served at Asador Fronton in Madrid. I've eaten it, and I understand why. I also suspect that many U.S. members here would reject it as tough, chewy and gamey. American taste in steak inclines much more toward mild flavors and soft textures (I know I generalize...).
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#17 Orik

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Posted 20 July 2004 - 03:06 PM

True, but do you think the meat itself is more flavorful, or is this a side effect of thinner cuts and more liberal use of salt and pepper? (and of course, longer chewing time)
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#18 Wilfrid1

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Posted 20 July 2004 - 03:09 PM

I am guessing the meat has a different flavor, due to dietary and other factors. But it would be by no means easy to conduct the controlled experiment: Spanish beef side by side with Kansas beef, say - same cut, same cooking conditions, same seasoning (or absence of). Maybe it could be done with Argentinian beef, if there's any in the stores.
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#19 Rail Paul

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Posted 20 July 2004 - 03:43 PM

The Australian meat board has expanded the marketing of Australian beef in the US. Many Shop-Rite and Kings stores carry it. However, my butcher said the export beef "may" be finished with grain for US tastes, so it might not make a good one to one comparison.


FWIW, the Jamison Farms (lamb) people in Pennsylvania assert that the type of grass on whcih the lambs munch makes a big difference in taste. JF uses high clover and spring water, as I recall.
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Posted 20 July 2004 - 03:49 PM

The Australian meat board has expanded the marketing of Australian beef in the US. Many Shop-Rite and Kings stores carry it. However, my butcher said the export beef "may" be finished with grain for US tastes, so it might not make a good one to one comparison.


FWIW, the Jamison Farms (lamb) people in Pennsylvania assert that the type of grass on whcih the lambs munch makes a big difference in taste. JF uses high clover and spring water, as I recall.

Yes, there are very large feedlots in Australia, but as far as I am aware the vast majority of domestic beef is not from feed lots.

#21 Melonious Thunk

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Posted 26 July 2004 - 02:28 AM

Well it goes to show ya! This weekend we had steak that I rate 9-9.5 out of 10. The best this year. Choice, unaged rib-eyes bought frpom Quattro's on Rt. 44 in Pleasant Valley NY. The last best steak I had came from there too. Half the price of the NYC prime merchants, these steaks were cut from the eye, about 3" thick. Grilled of a very hot cjharcoal fire, they were coated,as usual with olive oil and my five own pepper blend. The taste was fabulously beefy, with a nice chared crust, the meat was fork tender. No more city butcher prices for me.
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#22 Rail Paul

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Posted 26 July 2004 - 01:36 PM

No more city butcher prices for me.


Do you realize the heresy you've created here?

Some folks assert that only the best NYC restaurants, using their generations long relationships with the best NYC meat wholesalers could possibly have the best steaks. Your experiment has undercut the foundation for some of that assertion.
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#23 Melonious Thunk

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Posted 26 July 2004 - 02:05 PM

Ask Omni. I hipped her to this place, and she stops there all the time on the way their country house.

For all I know, Quattro buys his meat in NYC. I'll ask him next time. Years ago, we had a small grocery in our lake community run by Modesto Perraccio and his wife. Mo had been a butcher. Mo bought sides of beef and short loins in NYC and schlepped them to his large cold box in the back of the store, where he hung it to dry age for three weeks. His steaks (USD Choice) have never been rivalled in our experience. It was a sad day when Mo decided to sell his store and it eventually becase a typical "Boars Head" deli.
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#24 omnivorette

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Posted 27 July 2004 - 03:09 AM

That's right. Quattro is terrific. We buy steaks from there regularly, and we're always delighted with them. Cut to order, great service, and very high quality. And sausages (made by them), venison, spring lambs, lots of pork stuff, etc., etc.

And they make a mean hero too.
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#25 Stone

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Posted 27 July 2004 - 06:21 PM

I agree about Quattro.

I've also had a steak from Hahn's Farm, at the corner of Salt Point Turnpike and Netherwood. They grow the cows and send them out for slaughter. The farm has a small vegetable/meat stand on the side of the road. The rib-eye I got was pretty good, but they're sold frozen solid and the cut is too thin. (The guy said they keep asking the butcher to slice them thicker, but he wont.) I've got a porterhouse in my freezer.

#26 ngatti

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Posted 30 July 2004 - 01:49 AM

You can't really age the grass-fed stuff properly (28-35 days worth). The stuff rots before it ages. The fat content is a requirement. I have some paperwork on this, but it's buried in my office somewhere. Properly aged American corn-finished beef has a pretty unique flavor profile, IMO. Trying to compare grass-fed to it is like trying to compare two different species. Both have hteir adherents and, I suppose, their detractors. But I don't hear very much complaining about well aged corn finished prime beef. The deep aging adds the gaminess to the corn-fed stuff.
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#27 jinmyo

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Posted 30 July 2004 - 04:28 PM

You can't really age the grass-fed stuff properly (28-35 days worth). The stuff rots before it ages. The fat content is a requirement. I have some paperwork on this, but it's buried in my office somewhere. Properly aged American corn-finished beef has a pretty unique flavor profile, IMO. Trying to compare grass-fed to it is like trying to compare two different species. Both have hteir adherents and, I suppose, their detractors. But I don't hear very much complaining about well aged corn finished prime beef. The deep aging adds the gaminess to the corn-fed stuff.

Yes, I've found this trying to work out a dry-aging program with a local supplier of barley grass-fed beef.

Didn't work, though the beef is nice enough as such.
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#28 Guest_Aaron T_*

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Posted 16 July 2009 - 01:29 AM

The Wall Street Journal reports on prime beef making its way to supermarkets due to the decline in business at steakhouses. here.

The famous $9.99/lb prime beef at Costco in particular is mentioned. Makes me want to join costco.

The article also mentions deals at various steakhouses at the end.

#29 mitchells

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Posted 12 April 2010 - 01:49 PM

Splurged on a porterhouse and a cowboy rib steak from Lobels and was not disappointed. While the porterhouse was great, the rib steak may have been the best steak I have ever eaten. So buttery with a ton of beef flavor.

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#30 voyager

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Posted 25 November 2017 - 06:28 PM

I have a prime chateaubriand, about 4+ poumds, 2+" thick.   I plan to sear it on cast iron and finish in the oven.   How long do you think I should gauge for oven time?   Do you use a temp/minutes/per inch formula?     I want to pull it at about 125•.  


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