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#31 Behemoth

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Posted 25 November 2017 - 07:33 PM

For big hunks of meat I like to do low temperature -- sear in cast iron and then 80°C / 175°F for 1 hour per lb. (But I use a thermometer as well.) 


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#32 Peter Creasey

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Posted 25 November 2017 - 09:06 PM

If you sear it well, then check it with a temperature gauge after 5 minutes in the 400 degree oven and then every few minutes after that.

 

You'll want it rare and certainly not over-cooked.


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#33 voyager

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Posted 26 November 2017 - 03:21 AM

I agonized between these two reasonable but disparate methods, then went with Peter's since it is essentially the way I usually do  pan roasted meats.

 

Seared in smoking cast iron pan for as close to 5 minutes each side as I could with kitchen full of birthday twins and parents, into well pre-heated 400 oven for maybe 6 minutes.    Thermometer read 118.    Door shut for another maybe 5 minutes.   126.    Out of oven, removed from pan and rested maybe 20 minutes.    Crusty, red, tender as love.      Thanks to you both.

 

FWIW. I always preseason meat overnight.    Saran, salt. pepper, sliced garlic, fresh thyme and parsley, EVOO.    Both sides.   Wrap tight.    Excellent flavor.   


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#34 Peter Creasey

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Posted 26 November 2017 - 11:58 AM

Salt retards the searing/browning of the meat; thus, is likely better done after cooking (or toward the end).


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#35 Orik

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Posted 26 November 2017 - 02:00 PM

Salt retards the searing/browning of the meat; thus, is likely better done after cooking (or toward the end).

retards, yes


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#36 voyager

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Posted 26 November 2017 - 02:27 PM

P and O, yes, I know about this caveat.   But I'm not ready to let go of the outstanding flavor we get from the overnight wrap.   And acquiring a great sear has never been a problem.


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#37 Suzanne F

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Posted 26 November 2017 - 04:55 PM

Somehow I don't think Orik was referring to cooking meat.


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#38 Orik

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Posted 27 November 2017 - 12:53 AM

Voyager - of course I agree overnight salting is a good idea, even better of then wiped and dried thoroughly before searing, so as not to retard.
sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#39 voyager

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Posted 27 November 2017 - 01:10 AM

Voyager - of course I agree overnight salting is a good idea, even better of then wiped and dried thoroughly before searing, so as not to retard.

well, yes, otherwise you boil for the first few important minutes


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#40 Wilfrid

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Posted 27 November 2017 - 11:46 PM

Minetta Tavern used to boil or steam its steak pre-McNally.

If I ever boil a steak I call it boeuf a la ficelle.

#41 voyager

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Posted 28 November 2017 - 12:11 AM

I concede or warn that pans differ and matter.    I use ancient Griswold skillets that you can and do pre-heat to smoking before dropping in steaks or chops.    Sear is guaranteed.   


It's not my circus,

not my monkeys.


#42 Orik

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Posted 28 November 2017 - 02:19 AM

Minetta Tavern used to boil or steam its steak pre-McNally.

If I ever boil a steak I call it boeuf a la ficelle.


As far as I can tell the steak in all McNally places post-crapification (well, probably not MT) is precooked and then warmed up or kept warm in a steamy environment.
sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#43 voyager

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Posted 28 November 2017 - 02:43 AM

Am I allowed to say "eeeeeuuuuuw" ?


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not my monkeys.


#44 Peter Creasey

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Posted 28 November 2017 - 02:54 PM

Hopefully it won't be taken as political!?!


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#45 joiei

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Posted 22 January 2018 - 12:08 AM

Yesterday I had the privilege of judging a steak cookoff at the Sam's Club in Plano, TX.  One of the categories was tomahawks.  Several of the cook teams used sous vide for the tomahawks and I was very impressed at what they were turning in for the judges.  Moist, tender, juicy, and incredible.  The one that was most beautiful to me unfortunately was over salted.  There we over 40 teams cooking and turning in these steaks.  Being a competition food judge is a good thing on some days.  This competition was put on by the Steak Cookoff Associaiton. 

I just realized I posted this in on the wrong thread.  If a MOD wants to move it to Steaks, that is okay with me. 


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