Jump to content


Photo

Airport Dining on layovers


  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

#1 Rail Paul

Rail Paul

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 23,679 posts

Posted 21 December 2008 - 04:12 PM

Matt Gross, the NYT's Frugal Traveler, has some suggestions for air travelers. One of the best is the free yellow van at LAX that takes you directly to an offsite garage located next to In and Out burger.

Skip Bongo in Miami airport, even if it's owned by Gloria Estefan.

By the time I reached La Carreta, (snip)... The roast pork was juicy, garlicky and chock-full of real roasted flavor, and the cheese tasted as if it had actually been produced from the milk of a cow. La Carreta’s was a Cubano I would happily eat “off-campus,” as airline employees refer to the world outside the airport, even though the bread was oddly chewy and I wanted more pickles. Then again, I always want more pickles.


At DFW, the food is inside the security ring, although you may need the terminal rail system to access some locations in other terminals.

By this measure, Dallas-Forth Worth International Airport was exemplary, with not one but three Texas-style barbecue joints, all branches of off-campus stalwarts. Cousin’s Bar-B-Q was easily my favorite — the brisket had just the right balance of meat, fat and chewy, charred burnt bits — while Dickey’s Barbecue Pit, whose brisket was watery and ribs dry, made an intriguingly spiced hot link. Only Railhead BBQ disappointed, perhaps because I was already stuffed and had to save my chopped-beef sandwich for a cold midnight snack.

Dallas even had nonbarbecue worth savoring. At the sit-down Reata Grill, an outpost of a local mini-chain, I ate the $10.99 lunch special: tortilla soup and a big tamale bursting with beef and topped with pecan pesto. As I drank a Shiner Bock that was so cold the froth congealed, I overheard a woman at the bar tell her co-workers, with no hint of sarcasm, “I’m excited about my lunch.” Was this really an airport restaurant?


In Atlanta, the traveler enjoyed Paschal's, which has several locations inside the airport. Juicy sausage, fresh grits. However, the lunch counter in the cabbie waiting area provided the real excitement just a few minutes walk from the north baggage hall.

On the way back home to New York that night, I had another layover, two and a half hours, in Atlanta, so I decided to follow another Chowhound lead. Leaving the airport by the north baggage claim, I turned left and walked precisely seven minutes down a dark highway to the taxi assembly, the parking lot where cabbies await the call to pick up passengers. At the rear of the lot lay their break room, which doubled as their cafeteria. When cabbies wait, they get hungry, and since the vast majority of Atlanta’s airport-taxi drivers happen to be African immigrants, the cafeteria serves food to fit their tastes: Ethiopian injera, Somali rice and Nigerian fufu, with halal meats and vegetables cooked every which way.

At a little after 7 p.m., the break room was humming. Dramatic games of checkers and dominoes were under way at the long indoor picnic tables, and men crowded around TVs tuned to MSNBC and CNN, raptly following analyses of Barack Obama’s potential cabinet picks. At the food window, I ordered a bit of everything — the only choice, really, as the kitchen was almost out of food. (The best time to eat, I’m told, is 1 p.m.) My Styrofoam container held a bread roll, two simple sautés — one of chicken, onions and peppers, the other of beef, both spice-coated and peppery — plus a meaty hunk of fish in a memorably smoky tomato sauce.



<a href="http://travel.nytime...21airport.html" target="_blank">Deluxe</a>
Dreams come in all sizes, shapes, and colors.

#2 Suzanne F

Suzanne F

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 21,905 posts

Posted 21 December 2008 - 04:54 PM

I don't fly much -- next year will be a big year with three trips -- but this was great to see.

Missing from his list is Las Vegas. Does anyone have any recommendations? Evelyn? Anyone?

I don't actually know what a handbasket is -- but whatever they are, singer-songwriters are in the first ones going to hell. -- Sneakeater, 29 March 2018 - 12:06 AM

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#3 ghostrider

ghostrider

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,543 posts

Posted 21 December 2008 - 04:54 PM

That article is giving me a "Stack overflow at line 873" error message on every page. I have no idea what that means though I suspect it doesn't relate to pancakes.

The only advice I have for airport dining is that, if you're stuck waiting for someone at Newark for any length of time, take the Skytrain to terminal A for the only food court outside the security zones. Not that there's anything to rave about there, but if you're really starving, the fresh-tomato-&-basil pizza tastes pretty darned good considering that it's an airport food court.

Of course if you're stuck there for a really long time, you could take the train to Newark & the Ironbound, but I really hope that no one ever has to be grounded at an airport for enough time to make that feasible.
It was hard to avoid the feeling that somebody, somewhere, was missing the point. I couldn't even be sure that it wasn't me. - Douglas Adams

Please come visit my rock concert blog: Tantalized.

#4 Rail Paul

Rail Paul

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 23,679 posts

Posted 21 December 2008 - 05:19 PM

The only advice I have for airport dining is that, if you're stuck waiting for someone at Newark for any length of time, take the Skytrain to terminal A for the only food court outside the security zones. Not that there's anything to rave about there, but if you're really starving, the fresh-tomato-&-basil pizza tastes pretty darned good considering that it's an airport food court.

Of course if you're stuck there for a really long time, you could take the train to Newark & the Ironbound, but I really hope that no one ever has to be grounded at an airport for enough time to make that feasible.


The bar just inside the front door of the airport's Marriott hotel also has a decent bar food menu. Sandwiches, etc in the $10 range. Good burger and fries. Five minute walk across the parking lot.
Dreams come in all sizes, shapes, and colors.

#5 ghostrider

ghostrider

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,543 posts

Posted 21 December 2008 - 05:23 PM

QUOTE(Rail Paul @ Dec 21 2008, 12:19 PM) View Post
QUOTE(ghostrider @ Dec 21 2008, 11:54 AM) View Post
(snip)

The only advice I have for airport dining is that, if you're stuck waiting for someone at Newark for any length of time, take the Skytrain to terminal A for the only food court outside the security zones. Not that there's anything to rave about there, but if you're really starving, the fresh-tomato-&-basil pizza tastes pretty darned good considering that it's an airport food court.

Of course if you're stuck there for a really long time, you could take the train to Newark & the Ironbound, but I really hope that no one ever has to be grounded at an airport for enough time to make that feasible.


The bar just inside the front door of the airport's Marriott hotel also has a decent bar food menu. Sandwiches, etc in the $10 range. Good burger and fries. Five minute walk across the parking lot.

Thanks, that's good to know. There've been times when I'm meeting S coming back from a biz trip & the airline's automated flight status info has been pitifully inadequate & caused me to leave home hours too early. This is handy info for such times.
It was hard to avoid the feeling that somebody, somewhere, was missing the point. I couldn't even be sure that it wasn't me. - Douglas Adams

Please come visit my rock concert blog: Tantalized.

#6 Ron Johnson

Ron Johnson

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8,958 posts

Posted 23 December 2008 - 01:09 PM

useful information to use along with this thread.



#7 Rail Paul

Rail Paul

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 23,679 posts

Posted 23 December 2008 - 04:23 PM

QUOTE(Ron Johnson @ Dec 23 2008, 08:09 AM) View Post
useful information to use along with this thread.


Thanks for that reminder, Ron.

The vino volo location in Newark's terminal C (70s gates area) is scheduled to open in January. When I passed by two weeks ago, it looked like the work is just about done.
Dreams come in all sizes, shapes, and colors.

#8 9lives

9lives

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,025 posts

Posted 23 December 2008 - 04:34 PM

I've hit the La Carretta in Miami..good

Dickie's and the newer Cousin's in Dallas..both good options

Legal Sea Foods is in a few terminals at Logan and Dc" Reagan...also a Fuddruckers in TermA at Logan

guilty pleasure...Popeyes Fried chicken in Charlotte

not bad beef on weck at Buffalo...far better place a few miles from the airport; but if you're stuck...

#9 Rail Paul

Rail Paul

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 23,679 posts

Posted 06 January 2009 - 07:56 PM

NY Times readers offer some additional suggestions for airport layovers, or meal-replacement therapy.

More suggestions for Charlotte stopovers, Midway in Chicago, Denver, etc.


Legal Sea Foods at Boston’s Logan Airport has great fried clams. ...........Phillips in Charlotte Douglas International Airport, NC, is super — best crabcakes ever, anywhere.............The José Cuervo Tequilería at Charlotte Douglas International Airport is quite good. The black bean soup is a great starter, and I love the chicken soft tacos.

You visited the wrong Chicago airport. Next time, fly into Midway Airport and eat at Harry Caray’s Seventh Inning Stretch. Not quite as good as the Kinzie Street original, but hand-carved sandwiches (go for the prime rib) with signature house-made potato chips will fill you up quite nicely between flights (and there will be enough left over to make your airborne seatmates envious). Good array of beers, including the local Goose Island...Posted by Sandy, Chicago........As a Chicago expat, I would suggest Berghoff Cafe, located in Terminal 1, Concourse C, near Gate 25 in O’Hare Airport. They have great bratwurst and sauerkraut on a roll.

A hidden gem in Denver’s International Airport Terminal B (the United terminal): !Que Bueno! Mexican Grill. Satisfying fast Mexican food and I love the horchata!...........Every time I fly into Denver International Airport, I look for Lefty’s Mile High Grill (near Gate 44, if I remember correctly) ... great food, cooked right before your eyes .............Pappadeaux Seafood Kitchen in George Bush Intercontinental Airport. Could not believe airport food could be so good! I highly recommend their gumbos, bisques and fried shrimp.


La Guardia’s fabulous Art Deco Marine Air Terminal has an excellent restaurant, Rocco’s Yankee Clipper, that was a wonderful surprise for me last summer. After weeks of tasteless food (how many limp salads with apples, cheese and nuts — hardly low-cal — can you eat?). I found a cafeteria-style steam table offering, among other items, fresh roasted turkey, wonderful pasta, and broccoli cooked in garlic and oil...........At SeaTac International Airport, we plan a break long enough to have lunch at Anthony’s Restaurant, which emphasizes great seafood and good wines. There are numerous takeouts in the spacious Pacific Marketplace, but the best is Ivar’s Seafood Bar, which has great clam chowder. There are several wine bars that feature a full selection of Washington wines.





<a href="http://travel.nytime...tml?ref=dining" target="_blank">Readers and eaters</a>
Dreams come in all sizes, shapes, and colors.

#10 Rail Paul

Rail Paul

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 23,679 posts

Posted 19 December 2009 - 04:39 AM

Food and Wine offers some suggestions for airport dining in many hub locations.

Encounter Restaurant At the center of <b>LAX</b> is the 1961 Theme Building, a freestanding structure designed to look like a flying saucer. It's home to this space-age restaurant, known for 360-degree views, stylings stolen from The Jetsons and California-style dishes like organic salads and mushroom ravioli with grilled asparagus (Theme Building).

Chickie's & Pete's The <b>Philadelphia</b> airport recently overhauled its main food court, adding an outlet of this lively South Philly crab house known for its chowder, steak sandwiches and "crab fries," or French fries seasoned with crab-boil seasoning and served with a creamy cheese dipping sauce (Terminal A-West).

Pappadeaux Seafood Kitchen Like Louisiana, its neighbor to the east, <b>Houston</b> has its share of Cajun and Creole food. This regional chain serves gumbo, jambalaya, shrimp Creole and dirty rice (Terminal E, Gate 3)

El Bravo Mother and daughter Carmen and Lorraine Othon's green-chile tamales have been drawing crowds to their El Bravo restaurant in <b>Phoenix</b>'s Sunnyslope neighborhood for nearly 30 years. Now, Lorraine's daughter, Monique, serves those same tamales–prepared earlier that morning in the original location–at El Bravo's airport outpost (Terminal 4, near Gate D).

LaGuardia, Newark, San Francisco, Bonfire at both Logan and JFK, Rogue Brewing in Portland OR, Salt Lick BBQ in Austin, and several others are mentioned<



<a href="http://www.foodandwi...dining-spots/3" target="_blank">Best airport dining</a>
Dreams come in all sizes, shapes, and colors.

#11 StephanieL

StephanieL

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10,362 posts

Posted 19 December 2009 - 10:30 PM

I agree about Pappadeaux's in Houston. On weekdays at lunchtime, they have an AYCE buffet for $10.99 (which includes soft drinks with free refills). When we were there, the selections included blackened fish, gumbo, shrimp etouffee, okra, fried catfish, etc., all fairly spicy.

"Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires." --John Steinbeck

 

"Insanity runs in my family.  It practically gallops."--Arsenic and Old Lace

 


#12 beachfan

beachfan

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,390 posts

Posted 20 December 2009 - 05:13 AM

Awesome lobster rolls at Boston Logan's legal seafood. Probably the best airport meal in the U.S.


#13 Suzanne F

Suzanne F

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 21,905 posts

Posted 20 December 2009 - 05:34 AM

The only problem for those of us who take redeyes or early-morning flights is that none of these places are open when we need them. sad.gif Although I did have a nice, if expensive, breakfast at the Italian place in the new Jet Blue terminal at JFK earlier this year. But it was the only place open at the time.

I don't actually know what a handbasket is -- but whatever they are, singer-songwriters are in the first ones going to hell. -- Sneakeater, 29 March 2018 - 12:06 AM

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#14 voyager

voyager

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,537 posts

Posted 21 December 2009 - 10:10 PM

QUOTE(beachfan @ Dec 19 2009, 09:13 PM) View Post
Awesome lobster rolls at Boston Logan's legal seafood. Probably the best airport meal in the U.S.
Their chowder works, too.

It's not my circus,

not my monkeys.


#15 Rail Paul

Rail Paul

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 23,679 posts

Posted 06 August 2010 - 12:47 AM

O'Hare airport is expanding the use of push carts to sell alcohol in the terminals, and has extended the legal hours to 24. Although few flights depart after 11pm, perhaps this could allow people sleeping on the carousels etc in bad weather to have a wee nip before they retire for the evening.

Airport alcohol sales provide a solid revenue flow for the airport operators, although problems with drunken passengers on planes seems to be increasing

Clark County, Nev., which operates McCarran International in Las Vegas, is hoping to boost that figure. The county approved a plan to negotiate with a local firm to build a 1,200-square-foot liquor store inside baggage claim. The store could open early next year and bring $400,000 in new annual revenue to the airport, said Randall Walker, Clark County Director of Aviation.

Local law prohibits consumption of alcohol within 1,000 feet of a liquor store, which should discourage travelers from opening their purchases before leaving, Mr. Walker said. The shop is intended to serve arriving passengers.

Meanwhile, sales of wine inside the secured areas at airports also are growing. Vino Volo, a San Francisco airport wine-bar chain that opened its first shop in 2005, plans to add its 14th location this month and hopes to have 50 in three to five years. Vino Volo, which means "wine flight" in Italian, offers meals and wine-tastings and sells bottles to go from most of its locations.

Federal rules prohibit opening liquor bottles brought on the plane, but passengers have been known to flout the rules.

Amanda Bronesky, a spokeswoman for Taste Inc., the chain's parent company, said Vino Volo's goal is far from creating more drunken passengers. "It's a respite from your normal food court," she said.

Big airport concessionaire HMSHost, part of Italy's Autogrill SpA, has opened retail stores at two California airports that sell bottled local wines in recent years. It also operates wine bars that sell bottles in several airports and has plans to open more.

Chicago's plan to extend liquor sales at O'Hare and Midway is meant mainly to raise revenue for the city, which faces a $655 million budget shortfall.

But it also will provide "an additional amenity for the passengers," said a spokeswoman for the Department of Aviation.


WSJ
Dreams come in all sizes, shapes, and colors.