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St. John, London


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#61 Guest_Adam_*

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Posted 01 February 2005 - 12:13 PM

Maybe my paranoia is setting in, but the pellet was silver and very shiny. Anytime I've found a shot pellet before, it has been black, not silver Is it possible that this pellet was a plant ? No no, of course not ! Any bird shooters out there who can tell me ?

Damn, I just bought the book.

Silver shot, well this is what you would use when shooting were-mallard. Nasty buggers, but good flavour.

In some areas of the world they are replacing lead shot with other types of metal as the lead tends to wind up in the local wild life and is not good for them. Also, those of use that have had the joy of producing their own shot gun cartridges will have seen that the fresh lead pellets are quite silvery (they haven't tarnished yet in other words). Lead is very soft, you could tell if it is lead by biting it or scratching it with a knife. I doubt that it would be planted, but you never know with these tricky London types.

Could the shortness of the letter have anything to doe with his illness do you think?

#62 yvonne johnson

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Posted 01 February 2005 - 02:31 PM

I was thinking of illness too. How's Henderson's state of health?
It was not a new dish, as I recognised my tooth marks. Wilfrid

#63 macrosan

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Posted 01 February 2005 - 03:50 PM

Silver shot, well this is what you would use when shooting were-mallard. Nasty buggers, but good flavour.

Could the shortness of the letter have anything to doe with his illness do you think?

What a (silver) mine of information you are :lol: And I thought silver shot were reserved for vampires and enemies of The Lone Ranger :lol:

If his illness debars him from writing a proper letter, then what effect does it have on running two restaurants, writing a book, and doing al engthy tour of appearances in the USA ?

Fergus Henderson has always greatly impressed me, both as a chef and as a person. His Q&A on eGullet was by a large margin the best I ever saw there. Fergus put a lot of thought and effort into his replies, which were typed in for him by (I think) his general manager Thomas. If his health has severely worsened since then, that makes me sad but then maybe he should be lessening his workload rather than increasing it. He would best do that by concentrating all his time on running his main restaurant, I would judge.

I can't read the situation. I can only observe the practical results.

#64 yumyum

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Posted 01 February 2005 - 04:04 PM

I'm curious about the tone of Fergus' response to your letter of complaint ... given that this is a group that formerly loooooved St John enough to have various special occasion dinners as well as very special out of town guests there  :lol: I would be interested to know what he said.

I'm loth to publish it here, Yum. We wrote a friendly but pointed letter to Fergus, two pages long, in which we explained who we were, and that we were great fans of St John. The letter mainly concentrated on poor service, but also addressed some of complaints about the food.

Fergus' reply was half a page. He made a defence of his main goose dish, but never actually addressed any of the service issues. He regretted that we had not enjoyed our experience, and invited us to advise his manager when we returned so that he couls accord us some special treatment.

Macro -- thanks for the additional details. I dismiss his suggestion of informing them before you go again so they can treat you well. That's just nonsense -- they should always treat you well, whether you've called ahead to tell them you are special or not. Plus, how could they not know YOU are special upon arrival?
I like mine moist and buttery.

#65 marcus

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Posted 01 February 2005 - 04:29 PM

We had dinner at St John around the end of November. The service was fine, although we made no special demands, but the food, with the exception of great bread and good deserts, was fair to poor. The hare in a red wine sauce was virtually inedible. We were disappointed, but just chalked it up to being in London. Based on these write-ups, perhaps there is a more pertinent explanation.

#66 Wilfrid1

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Posted 01 February 2005 - 04:38 PM

I don't know how long Fergus has been ill, but his writing style has always been extremely minimalist.
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If the author could go around the place hitting random readers with a rubber hammer, the Pink Pig would still be worth a visit.

#67 foodie52

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Posted 01 February 2005 - 11:46 PM

A good restaurant ought to have the head chef there most of the time, don't you think? If he can't be there, then he should have an executive chef who runs the place successfully. I would have thought they would have had their formula for success pretty much down pat by now. Something must be going on. What a shame.

(I too have eaten there: it was January 2004, and I had a wonderful meal.)
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#68 g.johnson

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Posted 02 February 2005 - 03:08 PM

We had a good lunch last summer and Henderson was present then.
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#69 omnivorette

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Posted 02 February 2005 - 04:47 PM

I had two good meals there in May. I don't know if Fergus was there. One was dinner, one was lunch.
"It seems a positively Quixotic quest to defend food from being used as any kind of social signifier, as if it could avoid the fate of each other component of our everyday lives." -Wilfrid

#70 foodie52

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Posted 03 February 2005 - 02:24 PM

I see that Fergus is in New York today for a brief - very brief - booksigning.
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#71 Lippy

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Posted 03 February 2005 - 02:25 PM

Where?

#72 foodie52

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Posted 03 February 2005 - 02:36 PM

Our apologies for the short notice on this one but Fergus Henderson will be undertaking a brief signing of The Whole Beast on this Friday, February 4th from around 10.30 am.

The signing will take place at Kitchen Arts and Letters, 1435 Lexington Avenue, New York and will, due to other commitments be a somewhat brief affair however you can call ahead and reserve a signed copy. So, if your around Lexington tomorrow, hop along and meet the man himself.

The above is pasted from an email. It's tomorrow, not today - sorry.
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#73 GavinJones

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Posted 07 February 2005 - 10:59 AM

Dined on Friday, no noticeable falling off.

Snipe, presented with guts on toast & head split.

Chitterlings & dandelion

Rhubarb sorbet & russian vodka

(3 of the smoothest, delicately pink balls it could be your pleasure to be confonted with).

£50 per head including Ruinart rose & St. Chinian.
I believe this restaurant functions as much as a collective - though not to say this is not prone to failure - as a chef-driven restaurant. Has the repertoire changed at all?

#74 ampletuna

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Posted 18 February 2005 - 04:36 PM

St.J B&W last week.

starter of excellent potted pork with cornichons. with loads of their wonderful bread.

mains of cold lamb with anchovy and celeriac, pretty good but not the most flavoursome meat I've ever had. Others had halibut with fennel salad that was really tasty; duck leg with carrots and pigeon looked fine.

puddings: Pear trifle - first rate. OK steamed toffee pudding with custard and a great hunk of Montgomery with delicious fruit loaf.

service as chaotic as we have come to expect - 2 bottles of wine added to bill despite only having 2 glasses and still got it wrong second time.

Eccles cake as good as ever according to husband.

Definitely decided I prefer this venue to Smithfields - more lively and laidback but desire to got back is definitely waning.
Yes, I would not recommend smell, touch or taste when it comes to old cock selection. Opinions differ though. Adam 2/3/05

#75 Vital Information

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Posted 08 March 2005 - 03:51 PM

A week or so there was squirel on the menu. Anyone ever give that a go?
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