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#5416 Sneakeater

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Posted 11 January 2020 - 04:39 AM

Braised (by which I mean slow-cooked) wild boar foreshanks.  (No, I'm not doing tusk-to-tail:  it just looks like it.)  The broth with vegetables etc. over rice.  Sautéed kale (duh) on the side.

 

This seemed to me to be a vaguely (very vaguely) Spanish preparation.  So . . . .

 

2001 R. Lopez de Heredia Viña Bosconia Reserva

 

I hope this is a good enough vintage for you.  Bosconia does its elegant-but-full-bodied thing as usual.  Cherries up front:  luscious cherries.  Then licorice and spicecake-type spices.  Not as long a finish as I'd have expected.  Nevertheless, delicious in the extreme.

 

OF COURSE it went with the boar.


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#5417 Sneakeater

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Posted 13 January 2020 - 05:32 AM

The other boar foreshank (cooked along with the previous one and now reheated).  Same accompaniments.

 

I wanted a Syrah-based mainstream Rhone with this tonight.  It's embarrassing how long it took me to find one (at least one that was ready to drink).  And even more surprisingly, it turned out to be a very Southern Rhone:  not what you think of when you think of Syrah.

 

2012 Domaine de la Citadelle Luberon Rouge "Les Artemes"

 

70% Syrah, 30% Grenache.  Just what I was looking for.

 

This is the kind of wine I drink less and less of.  Big.  Not quite "mouthfilling" (thank God) -- but you really know it's there.  With this boar, though -- its own "big"-flavored thing -- it was what was needed.

 

No question that this is predominantly Syrah.  I would say that the main flavor element is black pepper (just right with this food!).  Brambly dark berry fruit.  Definite eucalyptus follow-up.  The Grenache mainly makes itself felt in the acid finish (very welcome here) -- although also by means of a general slobbery dog-like friendliness.  (I like Grenache -- but I don't respect it.)

 

Good pairing.  Good wine.


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#5418 Sneakeater

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 06:09 AM

Venison porterhouse chop.  Let me be absolutely up-front about this:  I sous vided it.  I'm as contemptuous of sous vide as the next guy.  But it seemed like the best preparation given that I've never avoided either undercooking or overcooking every venison steak I've ever made, ever (even using a thermometer).  This method brought my steak right to the medium-rare temperature I wanted and kept it there (and the strong sear I gave it at the end kept it from being too creepy).  It was great, really:  perfectly tender, but with that pissy venison tang.  Next time I'm going to make a mushroom gravy:  the only thing this seemed to lack.

 

I won't try to contend that my Joule isn't a toy.  But as I've said in connection with my crockpot (which I insist is not a toy), I love being able to have things cook while I'm out and about at night, dinner being ready (or nearly so) when I get home.  And one of the playtime aspects of the Joule is that I could check on the app to see how my venison was coming along during tonight's show's intermission.  Fun!

 

Roast Marina di Chiogga, that greatest of squashes, on the side.  And Sangre de Toro beans, laced with a liberal dose of smoked jalapeños (I have to say that, if you're going to forgo making a pot of classic New Orleans red beans, this is a really good way to cook these beans).  I can't wait to get to the leftover beans in a couple of days, when the flavors will only have deepened.

 

I'm pretty doctrinaire about pairing venison with Barolo.

 

1989 Giocomo Borgogno & Figli Barolo Riserva

 

Pretty good vintage, huh?   This is from before the days anyone thought about single vineyard Barolos, and it comes from several, some of them renowned.  Borgogno isn't the greatest producer in Piemonte -- but 1989, right? 

 

A label on the back says this bottle was "decanted" at the cellar in 2007.  I have no idea what that means.  So maybe I should be suspicious at how young this seems.  But really I'm kind of happy.  I wanted a wine with some fruit -- and this has fruit in spades.  Cherries and berries.  Indeed, the tobacco/leather follow-up is kind of subdued.  Tar and roses, sure (this is a Barolo).

 

Very far from the most characterful or distinctive Barolo I've ever drunk.  But it got the job done.


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#5419 Sneakeater

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 06:13 AM

I just found a stash of old Riojas I didn't remember I had!!!!!!!!!!!!!  Yo!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


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#5420 Wilfrid

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 11:38 PM

I have some old white and rose Rioja I always forget. LdH so presumably will last forever.

I have never cooked that cut of venison, only individual chops.

#5421 joethefoodie

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Posted 23 January 2020 - 12:24 AM

I'm trying this 2018 Tendu California Red for the first time. I think it was right around $20, via Chambers St.

 

It's Jill & Steve Matthiasson's new-ish foray into more affordable, quaffable wines. It's kinda delicious.

 

The 2018 is 5 grapes - Barbera, Aglianico, Montepuliciano, Cinsault, and Carignane. I'm hoping it will go well with the pasta con sugo di carne I'm making for dinner.

 

The 2017.



#5422 Sneakeater

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Posted 23 January 2020 - 06:41 AM

Wood pigeon, pan-roasted the Wilfrid Way®.  Some ventrèche to fatten up the pan, and then eaten on the side.  All under a nice beach plum gin sauce (hmmmmm, that'll be good with those venison porterhouses).  Leftover Sangre de Toro beans (I TOLD you they'd be even better left over) and some sautéed kale (JANUARY ugh) on the side.

 

This seemed to call for a mature Right Bank Bordeaux.  Coming right up.

 

2005 Couvent des Jacobins

 

This St. Émilion is a pretty simple wine, for an aged Grand Cru Classé Bordeaux (you'd almost pick it as a Cru Bourgeois).  LOT of fruit at the front:  dark berry, cranberry.  Not really much behind it:  little tobacco or leather, no eucalyptus.  Some herbs, I guess (reflecting the Cab Franc I presume is in there).

 

So the question is, is it too young, or is this all there is?  I'll give the rest of my bottles a few years -- but I have my doubts.

 

Nevertheless quite pleasant (and a good match for the beach plum sauce). 

 

Makes me reflect on how much we'd lose if we just gave up on Bordeaux, as current fashion dictates.


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#5423 Sneakeater

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Posted 23 January 2020 - 06:42 AM

Oh, I see it's 75% Merlot, 25% Cab Franc:  just how it tastes.


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#5424 Sneakeater

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Posted 23 January 2020 - 06:56 AM

One thing you definitely taste in the wine is tannins.  Some sips it's almost like drinking black tea.

 

So maybe a few more years.


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#5425 Sneakeater

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Posted 23 January 2020 - 07:06 AM

Today's cooking lesson (for me):  when you use bacon (or ventrèche) in cooking, you should reduce the salt you put in.

 

Duh.


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#5426 Sneakeater

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Posted 23 January 2020 - 07:23 AM

I'm trying this 2018 Tendu California Red for the first time. I think it was right around $20, via Chambers St.

 

It's Jill & Steve Matthiasson's new-ish foray into more affordable, quaffable wines. It's kinda delicious.

 

The 2018 is 5 grapes - Barbera, Aglianico, Montepuliciano, Cinsault, and Carignane. I'm hoping it will go well with the pasta con sugo di carne I'm making for dinner.

 

The 2017.

Oh, I've drunk this!  (Not necessarily the 2018 or the 2017 for that matter:  I have no idea what year.)

 

It was delicious!  And EXTREMELY food friendly.  It was like it would go with almost ANYTHING.


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#5427 joethefoodie

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Posted 23 January 2020 - 11:18 AM

It was delicious!  And EXTREMELY food friendly.  It was like it would go with almost ANYTHING.

 

 

It was. It is. It did! 

 

Nice acidity and not jammy like CAL can be, I guess because there's no real jammy grapes in there. Bottle went down easy.



#5428 Sneakeater

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Posted 23 January 2020 - 09:14 PM

These New Wave California wines (I'm trying not to say "natural") tend not to be jammy.


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#5429 Sneakeater

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Posted 25 January 2020 - 03:21 AM

I think Calcarius is such genius wine. (Sitting at the bar of a — the — Korean restaurant in Gowanus having dinner.)
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#5430 Sneakeater

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Posted 25 January 2020 - 03:27 AM

Calcarius Orange w/Korean food = heaven.
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