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#5446 Wilfrid

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Posted 11 February 2020 - 11:29 PM

I think this would be a better world if people started cooking every kind of bird slower and longer. They aren’t steak.

#5447 Sneakeater

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Posted 15 February 2020 - 05:19 AM

A couple more hours of cooking, and a few days of refrigerator rest, really did things for the pot-roasted pheasant.  Bread sauce and kale-and-brussels sprouts on the side (the good thing about restaurants' current refusal to portion things for fewer than two or three people is that, when you order a vegetable side dish, you can stretch it out for weeks at home) (if you're not afraid of old food).

 

It really makes things easy when you decided on your wine pairing days ago.  (Wonder what I'll drink with the next serving?)

 

2010 Vignoble Guillaume Pinot Noir

 

This is the same as last bottle.  Nothing to add.  It's good.  If you have any, drink up.


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#5448 Sneakeater

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Posted 15 February 2020 - 05:26 AM

This really is an overachieving little wine.


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#5449 Josh Karpf

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Posted 17 February 2020 - 03:41 PM

In the past couple of nights I've been enjoying my first advocaat, brought to me from Holland by my attorney brother. I didn't get eggnog this past year and still haven't tried making my first syllabub, so this was the perfect gift at the perfect time. But I may not make it through the whole bottle.

 

Here's a YouTube video of it since I am neither good at posting inline images nor turning videos into GIFs. Maybe YouTube will offer you, too, a liver "cleanse" video afterward.

 

 

Per Wikipedia: "Its origins can be traced back to 'abacate,' an alcoholic beverage of the indigenous people in Brazil, which was made with avocado. Dutch colonials of northern Brazil introduced this beverage to Europe as 'advocat/advocaat.' As avocados could not grow in northern Europe, the avocados were replaced with egg yolk. . . . 'Advocaat' is also the Dutch word for 'lawyer.' As the name of the drink, it is short for 'advocatenborrel,' or 'lawyer's drink,' where 'borrel' is Dutch for a small alcoholic beverage consumed slowly during a social gathering. . . . 'so named as a good lubricant for the throat, and thus considered especially useful for a lawyer, who must speak in public.'"



#5450 Wilfrid

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Posted 17 February 2020 - 11:44 PM

The only time in my life I drank a lot of advocaat was when I was spending quality time with a young woman who adored it. My taste for it didn’t outlast the period of hanging out, although I remain friends with her.

#5451 Josh Karpf

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Posted 18 February 2020 - 12:56 AM

The only time in my life I drank a lot of advocaat was when I was spending quality time with a young woman who adored it. My taste for it didn’t outlast the period of hanging out, although I remain friends with her.

Reminds me of the only time I watched a lot of sports, spending quality time with a young woman who adored the Detroit Red Wings. I learned the game, bought her a matryoshka-doll set of the team for her birthday. Finally asked her out. She said yes, said she'd pick our first bar. It was Julie's, and since my publishing life has been mostly corporate-looking women anyway, gender barely a thought for me from 9 to 5, I didn't realize I was the only guy at the bar till my second drink. We stayed friends for years, but not over hockey.

 

I'm glad I'm now working on a near-death-experience pseudoscience manuscript. Because today I learned that the advocaat label says, in Dutch, to drink within six months. It was bought three years before this week's regifting. I may be dead already.



#5452 Wilfrid

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Posted 18 February 2020 - 05:11 AM

Good tales.

I guess the egg in the advocaat may have an expiration?

#5453 Sneakeater

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Posted 18 February 2020 - 07:00 AM

The rest of the pot-roasted pheasant (the remaining gravy and vegetables and giblets will be used as a pasta topping:  I'm SUCH a bonne femme).  Bread sauce on the side, and kale and brussels sprouts.

 

There's really nothing to drink with this but Pinot Noir.

 

2011 Domaine Michel Lafarge Volnay

 

Not the greatest Burgundy from not the greatest vintage for not the greatest Burgundies.

 

There's some fruit there -- cranberry, cherry, and red berries -- but it's fading.  The following finish isn't long.  To the contrary, it's short.

 

I mean, this isn't unpleasant or anything.  For a Monday night leftover dinner it's fine.  But nobody's gonna be singing "hossana in excelsis" for this.


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#5454 Sneakeater

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Posted 23 February 2020 - 05:38 AM

Shad roe sautéed in bacon (well, ventrèche) grease and butter with a lemon/caper/bacon (well, ventrèche)/butter sauce (with lots of garlic and shallots).  Sort-of-fried bread sauce and kale-and-brussells-sprouts on the side.  FWIW, I dusted the roe sack in buckwheat flower rather than white.

 

The totally unexpected appearance of shad roe at the Greenmarket -- I haven't seen any in years -- deserved a special wine.

 

2014 Domaine de Terre Dorées (Jean-Paul Brun) Fleurie "Grille Midi"

 

Probably my last bottle of any Beaujolais of any kind from my ATF vintage, 2014.  (Well, at least my last bottle on site.)  And what a bottle!

 

This is a New Wave natural Beaujolais (and the New Wave there is just about as old now as the New Wave in New York).  And what a splendid example!  Some funk overlaying the fruit.  But the fruit!  Tart berries and lots of them.  Plum but just a little.  And a galaxy of other flavors.  Flowers -- roses -- and bitter herbs (getting us ready for Pesach).  Acid acid acid to cut through all that butter and bacon grease (and the richness of the roe to begin with).

 

You drink this wine and you think, wines like this are going to take over the world.


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#5455 Sneakeater

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Posted 23 February 2020 - 05:39 AM

And I managed to keep myself from overcooking the roe!  A whole new thing for me!


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#5456 Sneakeater

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Posted 23 February 2020 - 05:58 AM

Now the cola is coming out!  This is quite a wine!


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#5457 Wilfrid

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Posted 25 February 2020 - 04:51 AM

It seems a pity not to add a healthy dash of heavy cream to the shad roe. Says Fritz Brenner, anyway.

#5458 Sneakeater

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Posted 25 February 2020 - 04:53 AM

I was going to do that to tonight's round.  But then I remembered I had something else I needed to use.


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#5459 Sneakeater

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Posted 25 February 2020 - 05:58 AM

Shad roe:  lobe 2.  I had this sort of Caribbeanoid relish left over from a long-ago cracked conch; to make it a bit more reticent for the shad roe, I mixed it with some Duke's to make a spiced mayonnaise (or maybe a Caribbeanoid sauce tartare).  This was so great I could bottle it.  I served the shad with toast points drenched in the butter I cooked the roe in.  And some leftover restaurant leafy green with mushrooms.

 

I totally aced the wine pairing.

 

2014 Nicolas Gonin Verdesse

 

It has finally gotten through my head that Isère isn't near the Savoie but rather in the Savoie -- just not the part we think of as the wine region.

 

Verdesse is a white grape that's found pretty much only around Isère (and there isn't much there).  It's floral, fragrant, and (it's from the Savoie) acidic:  perfect for tonight's shad roe preparation.

 

You smell white meadow flowers.  The first thing you taste is melon.  I don't really know how to describe what comes next -- it's almost more a scent than a flavor -- but it's very very pleasant.  There's some citrus:  lime (I'd put a lot of lime in that Caribbeanoid relish).  Then, walnuts.  And thanks to global warming, the acid kick at the end isn't as abrasive as it would have been in the '80s, when I started exploring the wines of this region.

 

This is a wine that "feels" round, but tastes light.  Light but full.  A lovely lovely wine.

 

I have formed the opinion that Nicolas Gonin is a genius winemaker.  This bottle did nothing to dispell that.


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#5460 Sneakeater

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Posted 25 February 2020 - 06:01 AM

I wonder if there'll be any shad roe next week?


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