Jump to content


Photo

The Rest of Us


  • Please log in to reply
5565 replies to this topic

#5521 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 65,459 posts

Posted 24 March 2020 - 02:16 AM

And, in case you're wondering, I think this worked better as a pairing than last night's Saint-Véran because there the fruit veered tropical -- exotic flavors that just don't go with homely Mid-Atlantic shad -- whereas the SB fruit, while assertive, is pretty straightforward.


Bar Loser

MF Old

#5522 voyager

voyager

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,685 posts

Posted 24 March 2020 - 02:17 AM

I never complain.  


And then I found out that it IS my circus, and they ARE my monkeys..,


#5523 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 65,459 posts

Posted 24 March 2020 - 02:22 AM

OK, whatever it is you people in California and the South do when something isn't what you prefer.


Bar Loser

MF Old

#5524 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 65,459 posts

Posted 24 March 2020 - 02:25 AM

To tell you the truth, the advanced age of the dried sage I used in the sage butter part of this dish (yes, I used dried powdered sage:  so shoot me) probably saved it from being as shouty as it might have been.


Bar Loser

MF Old

#5525 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 65,459 posts

Posted 24 March 2020 - 02:26 AM

(yes, I used dried powdered sage:  so shoot me)


Sure, I went out and got some leaves to use as garnish. But we're all about our pantries now, right?
Bar Loser

MF Old

#5526 voyager

voyager

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,685 posts

Posted 24 March 2020 - 02:36 AM

OK, whatever it is you people in California and the South do when something isn't what you prefer.

 

 

 

(yes, I used dried powdered sage:  so shoot me)


Sure, I went out and got some leaves to use as garnish. But we're all about our pantries now, right?

 

 

 

To tell you the truth, the advanced age of the dried sage I used in the sage butter part of this dish (yes, I used dried powdered sage:  so shoot me) probably saved it from being as shouty as it might have been.

Actually, I think you're on to something.   Granted, sage isn't one of my favorite herbs, especially in your face sage.   But I have two jars, one in town given to me 20 years ago by a gardening friend, and the other in the country given maybe 30 years ago by an employee of husband.    Both of these are viable in a lovely, mellow and subtle way.    Sure, use more if you want.   And yes, I love the sharp fragrance of a fresh sage leave as accent.    Just not SAGE.


And then I found out that it IS my circus, and they ARE my monkeys..,


#5527 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 65,459 posts

Posted 25 March 2020 - 03:19 AM

If any times ever called for a gross and comforting Mississippi Roast, these are them.

 

Tonight's dinner:  SOUTH MEETS NORTH!  A Mississippi Roast over PA Dutch pot pie squares with some baked (Jacob's Cattle) beans.*  (And cabbage, which I guess is neutral.)  The baked beans -- something I've never made before -- were a huge success, BTW (OK:  "baked" not baked, as I made them in the slow cooker) (I did reheat them in the oven).

 

As for the Mississippi Roast, I did my usual tweaks, as well as a new one.  The usual tweaks are (1) putting a chopped leek beneath everything else before cooking (cuz I think this dish calls for an allium) (although for the life of me, I don't see garlic in this -- even though I often read of people's inserting it); (2) home-pickling a pepper a little hotter than the peperoncini called for in the recipe (this time, I think I hit it just right:  I used an Anaheim pepper variant that was just a little bit hot, so it added a kick of interest without being so hot as to be distracting, as has happened to me in the past); and (3) throwing in a cube of frozen meat stock (which arguably creates too much liquid for this pot roast -- although the extra liquid is welcome, I think, for storage) (and it's nice to have something in the gravy that isn't butter, mayonnaise, or flour).  The new tweak -- something that I think was wildly successful, even if it would probably get me lynched back where this recipe comes from (look on the internet for commentary on Sam Sifton's "elevated" version of the classic recipe) (which, to be honest, is what I follow:  I'm not eating all that processed stuff, either -- even if tastes better) -- was to ramp up the umami even higher than it already is in this umami-laden dish by throwing in some minced anchovies.  BINGO!!!!!!!!  I highly recommend doing that to all of you.

 

I tend to like Alto Piemonte wines with Mississippi Roasts, for their strong acid presence with round friendly fruit.

 

2010 Vallana Campi Ruidii

 

This actually worked better with the Mississippi Roast than the Alto Piemonte I usually drink with it (Propertia Sperino's Uvaggio).  That's because this is a little bigger -- cruder even -- and with a Mississippi Roast, "big" and "crude" are complementary characteristics.

 

Don't get me wrong.  This is objectively a good wine.  But with an umami-laden mouthful like a Mississippi Roast, it just springs to life.

 

Despite this junior cuvée's advancing age (confusingly, its name derives from what was a very expensive wine in the '50s and before, when the wines of this area were The Shit), there's still plenty of fruit at the front.  Biggish dark fruit.  But there's still a bit of a tickle from all the "altra uva" that are customarily blended into these Alto Piemonte wines.  I love this style.  For everyday drinking, I like it even more than a Nebbiolo Langhe.

 

Of course, the best thing about this dinner is that this Mississippi Roast is only going to get even better with some refrigerator age.  Eat your heart out, Chang.

________________________________________________________________________

* Jacob's Cattle Beans originated in the Maritime Provinces -- which is also where the baked bean recipe I used comes from.  Now, to be sure, people from the Maritime Provinces eventually became Cajuns, so you can argue there's no necessary North/South disjunction here.  But they weren't the people in the Maritime Provinces who made baked beans.  Those were the people who threw the eventual Cajuns out.


Bar Loser

MF Old

#5528 AaronS

AaronS

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,900 posts

Posted 25 March 2020 - 03:30 AM

the secret ingredient in mine is a second package of ranch, and I’ve used brisket recently too. I’ll try anchovies next time.

#5529 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 65,459 posts

Posted 25 March 2020 - 03:33 AM

Yeah, brisket.  Gotta try that.


Bar Loser

MF Old

#5530 AaronS

AaronS

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,900 posts

Posted 25 March 2020 - 03:45 AM

it was all they had at ends meat. I don’t think it’s necessary but it was better than usual.

#5531 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 65,459 posts

Posted 25 March 2020 - 03:48 AM

I can totally see it.


Bar Loser

MF Old

#5532 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 65,459 posts

Posted 25 March 2020 - 03:49 AM

Has the right texture, for one thing.


Bar Loser

MF Old

#5533 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 65,459 posts

Posted 25 March 2020 - 04:17 AM

An interesting thing about Mississippi Roasts is that you can't call them "moreish".   Because, delicious as the are (and really, I can't think of anything that tastes better), they're RICH with a capital "R", "I", "C", and "H".  They're Richie Rich rich.  It's hard to eat more than a portion at a single sitting (much as you might wish to).


Bar Loser

MF Old

#5534 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 65,459 posts

Posted 26 March 2020 - 02:11 AM

Morscher's schweinebauch -- "stuffed bacon", bacon wrapped around a loaf of something that resembles really good luncheon meat, with olives and red peppers blended in -- on Lost Bread Honey Buck Rye, with grainy mustard.  On the side, sautéed cabbage and homemade German potato salad.

 

OK, the sandwich -- delicious as it was -- was just shopping.  But I want to talk about the potato salad.  When I make something like German potato salad and it comes out right -- as it did tonight (unlike the last time I tried to make it) -- I sort of can't believe it.  It's not that German potato salad is the height of world cuisine, or particularly hard to make.  But if I were served this at, say, a biergarten in a remote corner of Staten Island, I would think it was really good.  Yet I made it myself, at home!

 

I thought an Alsatian Riesling would be nice with all this.

 

2018 Domaine Barmès-Buecher Riesling "Tradition"

 

Another one of those wines that have no claim to greatness but display high typicity and a good deal of care in the making.  This is less bone-dry than an Alsatian Riesling would have been 30 years ago -- warmer climates tell -- but it's got that bite behind the fruit that is such an appealing feature of this type of wine.  Just more sumptuous than what we used to expect.
 


Bar Loser

MF Old

#5535 joethefoodie

joethefoodie

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 12,280 posts

Posted 26 March 2020 - 11:28 AM

Morscher's schweinebauch -- "stuffed bacon", bacon wrapped around a loaf of something that resembles really good luncheon meat, with olives and red peppers blended in -- on Lost Bread Honey Buck Rye, with grainy mustard.  On the side, sautéed cabbage and homemade German potato salad.

 

I think, when I was in the deli world, we used to call that olive loaf?

IMG_7808-e1555042152583.jpg