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Best coffee bars


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#151 johannabanana

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 03:01 PM

Sant'Eustachio whisking in egg whites for texture and adding sugar to mask the flavor is adorable/enjoyable, but not as, uhh, "coffee" per se.

 

I didn't know this about the egg whites but I see Sprudge mentions it.

 

I've been very pleased mail-ordering from George Howell, particularly the beans they "direct trade". Joe Pro occasionally sells George Howell, too.

 

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#152 taion

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 03:42 PM

Oooh: https://store.george...o-carnaval.html

 

Box Kite gets George Howell beans sometimes as well.

 

It's damn hard to find natural process beans, though.


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#153 johannabanana

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 04:16 PM

I stick to the less expensive George Howell beans but the article in a recent Art of Eating about Gesha beans was fascinating.



#154 taion

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 04:27 PM

I haven't seen it (and it's paywalled).

 

The title of "Will the Flavor of Geisha Change Everything?" seems to suggest a flawed premise though, given that Hacienda La Esmeralda has been the hotness for like over a decade now.

 

Then again, Neuschwander obviously knows her stuff.

 

Is the thesis something like – high-end ge(i)sha coffee is really expensive, but is compelling enough that it might drive a different cafe business model that makes sense with > $10 cups of coffee?


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#155 johannabanana

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 06:18 PM

The Art of Eating is worth subscribing to. The article actually focuses on the Petersons. The thesis is that the commercial success of Gesha suggests coffee variety and terroir will become more and more important for coffee drinkers, akin to wine. I've heard George Howell make a similar argument at one of his slideshow presentations.



#156 taion

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 09:27 PM

http://www.eater.com...press-starbucks
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#157 oakapple

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 09:52 PM

Is the thesis something like – high-end ge(i)sha coffee is really expensive, but is compelling enough that it might drive a different cafe business model that makes sense with > $10 cups of coffee?

 

We were in Panama a few months ago and brought back a small bag of Geisha, which cost us $25. It is an incredibly smooth and mild coffee that almost reminds you of tea. Although I liked it, I prefer my coffee on the mild side. I'm not sure I see Geisha becoming popular here, where most people prefer a coffee taste veering towards motor oil.


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#158 Orik

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 10:31 PM

Yup. An incredible tea like coffee when cold brewed, practically useless for espresso outside of barista championship setting. 


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#159 taion

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 11:10 PM

I've never had geisha cold-brew, but it seems like it'd be a waste, no? I feel like in general you wouldn't get the floral notes that you really want there.

Then again, I've paid stupid prices for natural process geishas instead of wet process ones, so what the heck do I know?
I didn't tip at Per Se either.

#160 Sneakeater

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Posted 09 June 2016 - 03:51 AM

Then again, I've paid stupid prices for natural process geishas instead of wet process ones, so what the heck do I know?


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#161 joethefoodie

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Posted 09 June 2016 - 11:06 AM

But not really that surprising.



#162 taion

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Posted 10 June 2016 - 02:36 PM

Back to spelling it "gesha", then.
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#163 joethefoodie

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Posted 01 July 2016 - 12:48 PM

We've decided to become early adopters of the newest way to brew pourover coffee...I'm sure there are some who will argue, nay - even nitpick - with this methodology.160704_a20135-1000.jpg



#164 Anthony Bonner

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Posted 01 July 2016 - 01:44 PM

does it have a built in refractometer to measure extraction? 


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#165 joethefoodie

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Posted 01 July 2016 - 01:53 PM

does it have a built in refractometer to measure extraction? 

Of course.  And a scale that weighs milligrams (which might've come in handy during those college years).